Power Inverter 800W was 59.99 now 29.99 @Argos - HotUKDeals
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373Expired

Power Inverter 800W was 59.99 now 29.99 @Argos

thisismark Avatar
8y, 5m agoFound 8 years, 5 months ago
800 watt with 1200 watt peak power.

Allows the use of domestic home appliances to be used outside.

Play stations, cd player, portable DVD, drills, tv, lap tops etc.

Also ideal for camping and caravans.

Power on the move.
I paid this much for a 300W inverter
More From Argos:

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#1
Why has this been "expired" and "spammed"? Sounds like a good deal! Wanted to add heat, but no can do... :(
#2
Still available and a good deal ???, will ask to un expire :?
#3
Sorry chaps put the wrong date on the expire. I have asked for this to be un-expired.
I think this is a great price!
1 Like #4
Unexpired as the expiry date added auto expired it.
#5
Thanx for your help;-)
#6
hot ............. :thumbsup:
#7
How long would it take for this to kill a car battery? :)
#8
Takes a fair time to drain your battery. I use mine for the electric cool box obviously to keep the STELLA chilled
#9
anewman
How long would it take for this to kill a car battery? :)



Depends if the battery is in a positive mood :roll:
#10
owlass
Depends if the battery is in a positive mood :roll:


Oh please no negative comments:w00t:
#11
Well at 800watts it would take 70+ amps, about half of what a starter motor takes, so keep the engine running. :roll::-D
#12
I think my alternator is only 55 amps. This is a great deal though. Will have to try it out and be prepared with jump leads etc :D Rated hot, thanks for posting :)
#13
HI, Will this work an electric patio heater and not drain the battery too quickly?
#14
I suspect this need hard wiring to the battery & not a cigarette lighter like smaller versions.
#15
no1gary
HI, Will this work an electric patio heater and not drain the battery too quickly?


OHHHH also will it do my PS3 with a 50" plasma and surround sound system ;-)
#16
big-boy;2347580
OHHHH also will it do my PS3 with a 50" plasma and surround sound system ;-)

They seem to get away with it on pimp my ride ;-)
#17
got one good at that price,
#18
Hi

advise please. i am planning to make my son a cricket ball machine. Could this be used to power the motors for the machine from a car battery or similiar battery?
1 Like #19
For the avoidance of doubt, what this does is turn 12v (ie from a car battery) into mains 220 volts. At this rating as previously stated it will have to be Crocodile clipped onto the car's battery and it will produce near mains like voltages on its socket output.

This will allow you to plug in "normal" mains appliances eg a small microwave oven (always assuming the device is within the 800W maximum rating.

Might be an idea if pulling this on full load to run the car's engine periodically so you don't flatten the car's battery. Some inverters have a cut out if the car's battery drops below a certain threshold (so you can still start the engine again).
#20
no1gary
HI, Will this work an electric patio heater and not drain the battery too quickly?


A friend of mine bought one and runs the floodlights at QPR off it....
#21
What is this thing for?
#22
Excellent price, thank you for post. :thumbsup:
#23
You wire it up to a 12v battery and run home appliances off of it
#24
could this be used to power up electiricity in a house in a third world country when the power goes off? I'm planning to live in sub saharan africa later this year for charity work.
1 Like #25
It should be noted that car batteries are not designed to be used for applications such as this.

A car battery has one primary use - to provide a massive kick of power to fire the starter motor in order to turn the engine which operates cylinders under compression - this is no mean feat.

If you run your car battery down, even just a little, you'll quickly notice that the starter appears to struggle to get the engine turning. Discharging a car battery using an inverter on a regular basis will knacker your battery in double-quick time.

This is where deep cycle batteries come in. These are designed to be able to be heavily discharged and recharged on a regular basis. They are designed to supply a more constant power rather than a massive kick like the car battery - they will last longer. A deep cycle battery is commonly called a Leisure Battery and are mosty common in the boating & caravaning communities. They're regularly available in car factors and store like Halfords.

If you're going to use an inverter, seriously consider one as you poor old car battery may give up the ghost when you most need it.
#26
I have used one of these for camping for at least 5 years on the same battery no problems as yet, but just be aware of how long it is on the battery without the engine running
#27
I think I'll get one to power all the homes and businesses in Bedfordshire and do my bit for the planet, very green. Voted hot.
#28
Ladies/gents ive just seen Aldi offering one of the for these for the same price but its only 300w
http://www.aldi.co.uk/uk/html/offers/2867_6351.htm
#29
I have 60w, 100w and 150w inverters, and I doubt i'd ever need an 800w one for my meagre usage of battery power. It is a good price though, if you are capable of producing 800w of portable power for long periods. But for a bedside lamp and portable TV, 100w is plenty.
#30
thisismark;2357799
Ladies/gents ive just seen Aldi offering one of the for these for the same price but its only 300w
http://www.aldi.co.uk/uk/html/offers/2867_6351.htm


Argos do a 350w inverter for the same price too
http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/7402216.htm
Offer valid for same period as 800w version
1 Like #31
anewman;2346928
How long would it take for this to kill a car battery? :)


This is a very good question!
Power (Watts) = Volts x Amps
Or put another way:
Amps = Watts/Volts
In this case: Amps = 800/12 = 66.67A
Battery capacity is measured in Amphours (Ah) which in simple terms means how many amps the battery can supply in 1 hour (or conversely, how many hours a battery can last supplying 1Amp).
Battery capacity varies by car and engine and could typically be as small as 36Ah for a small petrol engined car or 90Ah for a large diesel engined car.
In my car I have a 60Ah battery which is large for a petrol car and average for a small diesel car.
In simple terms a 60Ah battery will last just under an hour supplying 66.67A
But, most inverters have an auto cutout if the battery supply voltage falls below a certain level - this is to prevent you completely draining the battery (which is not good), to ensure the inverter still operates correctly and most importantly, to allow the battery to to retain enough power to start the car.
So I would imagine I'd be lucky to get 30mins out of my battery!
What about with the engine running? Well here too you may run into problems. A typical car will have an alternator that supplies between 50A and 90A (again depending on the vehicle). Not without coincidence, those cars with smaller batteries usually come with smaller capacity alternators.
Note this is the maximum output of the alternator typically achieved at about the maximum permitted speed of the engine - certainly not at tickover.
So you see, half the alternators running with an engine screaming at full speed will not supply enough power to balance what this inverter could pull. (which means it will still drain the battery even with the engine running)
On the bright side, this only occurs if you are drawing the maximium continous 800w power this inverter can supply - if you only plug in a 60W light bulb, it'll last for quite a few hours.
#32
been using 600 watt inverter at stables for lighting tv and mains clippers 85 amp batt lastes a long time.I use 20 watt low energy lights on this gives out lots more light than 12v halagen or 12 v fluorecent. its used every night for quite a few weeks you need 600 watt plus for starting motors and low energy lights even though only using 63 watt,s with all lights on got 300 watt one will not start lights very well .Also just got 12 watt solar panel from maplins £39 hoping this will save me charging batt cheaper and not noisy like generator voted hot realy good find
#33
tempted
#34
I have one for charging phones/PMRs/rechargeable battery chargers while camping (via a multiblock) and it could run for days without flattening the battery (Main Bosch 1AN - 100Ah and 027 scrap yard special on a twin charging circuit).

If you do run a microwave from this - KEEP THE ENGINE RUNNING!!!
#35
andy math;2361594
been using 600 watt inverter at stables for lighting tv and mains clippers 85 amp batt lastes a long time.I use 20 watt low energy lights on this gives out lots more light than 12v halagen or 12 v fluorecent. its used every night for quite a few weeks you need 600 watt plus for starting motors and low energy lights even though only using 63 watt,s with all lights on got 300 watt one will not start lights very well ....

Actually, this is probably more to do with the type of output these cheap inverters produce rather than quantity.
The power rating quoted for inverters is the maximum continous power. e.g a 300W inverter is usually capable of producing 600w peak (i.e. for a short very period)
Mains electricity is output as a pure sine wave form
These cheap inverters produce a modified (stepped) sine wave output. More expensive inverters are available that produce pure sine wave outputs but these cost at least twice the price.
Whilst a modified sine wave (msw) output make no difference to appliances that have a resistive load (such as traditional light bulbs), it is not really suitable for appliances that have an inductive load (such as motors and low energy light bulbs) - just the things you are trying to use it for. Although the larger capacity msw inverter is apparently allowing you to run them, it possibly is causing damage to those appliances reducing their expected lifespan.

See here for a better explanation:
http://www.reuk.co.uk/Pure-Sine-Wave-Power-Inverters.htm
#36
ibiza;2364448
I have one for charging phones/PMRs/rechargeable battery chargers while camping (via a multiblock) and it could run for days without flattening the battery (Main Bosch 1AN - 100Ah and 027 scrap yard special on a twin charging circuit).

If you do run a microwave from this - KEEP THE ENGINE RUNNING!!!

Sorry, not sure what a PMR is? (Personal Mobile Radio?? e.g. Walkman/iPod)
If so, you don't need an 800w inverter for this - probably a 150w would be better suited.
Inverters up to 150w can generally be run off a cigarette lighter socket (so you can use them whilst driving)
Inverters greater than 150W need to be connected directly to the battery. 300-350W inverters generally have both capabilities but still cannot provide more than 150W from the cigarette lighter socket (protected by fuse on vehicle)
The other thing to note is that inverters greater than 150W usually have a fan built in to ensure the inverter does not overheat - this generally operates all the time the inverter is receiving power and draws up to 0.4A (so slowly drains the battery). Inverters of 150W and less usually have no requirement for a cooling fan and so draw no (or negligible) current when not actually powering anything.

With regards to a microwave, I can see why you would need about an 800W inverter, but again, microwaves use an inductive load. Attempting to power a microwave using a low cost modified sine wave output inverter could cause serious damage to the microwave oven.
1 Like #37
I had a look at the 800w inverter today in Argos and having read the instructions, would clarify the following:

Features:
Internal fuses to protect against short circuits (output)
Overload protection - to protect against overload (automatically reset)
Temperature protection - to prevent inverter overheating - automatic reset once inverter cools down
Low voltage protection (input) - alarm at 10.5V, auto-shutdown at 10.0V
No load current : <0.8A (not 0.4A as I previously suggested - that's therefore almost 10w, the equivalent of a couple of tail-lamp bulbs)
(Note: No reverse polarity protection on this inverter - no guarantee cover for damage caused to the inverter being incorrectly wired up)

How long will the battery last?
As per my previous post, but the supplier has allowed for a 70% efficiency factor.
Therefore current drawn at full load is actually 66.67/0.7 = 95A
The manufacturer believes with this extra current drawn and a typical 50Ah - 75Ah battery you'll get about 10 minutes before you've flattened the battery enough to cause the auto-shutdown to operate because of low voltage.
For this reason, the instructions suggest either running the engine continuously or at least 15 mins every 30-60mins ... (err, at full load, the battery will be dead after 10 mins without the engine running and if you see my post earlier about the typical maximum capacity of an alternator being about 90A, even running the engine flat out continuously won't produce enough charge to balance what the inverter pulls at full load.)

As mentioned by a previous poster, a strong recommendation to use deep-cycle /marine batteries is made. These are said to be good for 100 deep cycle charges, whereas a usual automotive battery will only last about 10 cycles.

With regard to resistive Vs inductive loads the instructions gloss over this simply saying that inductive loads may use more power than an equivalent rated resistive load (- yeah, that's because using an appliance that has an inductive load with the modified sine wave will cause a loss of energy when heating up/damaging the appliance (basically anything with a coil or transformer in it))

The instructions warn against using 2 specific types of (inductive load) appliances with this inverter:
1. Chargers that have the transformer as part of the plug (e.g. mobile phone chargers). The danger they express relates to them possibly overheating causing damage to the inverter - it does allow chargers to be used when the transformer is separate from the plug (e.g. laptop power supplies). For chargers that are part of the plug, it suggests monitoring them to ensure they don't overheat.
2. Microwave ovens - it advises that the power of a microwave oven e.g. 600w is the actual power delivered to the cooking food - it suggests the actual power required to drive this size of oven would actually usually be around 1100w (so too big for this inverter)

Another interesting snippet I gleaned from the instructions. The supplied connecting leads are about 90cm long and fitted with crocodile clips to fit to the battery. The instructions advise against using leads longer than 2m (I guess due to voltage/power loss)
However, it also says do not place the inverter near any flammable materials or any location where flammable fumes or gasses may accumulate, such as the battery compartment of the vehicle. It goes on to say do not place the inverter where it will be exposed to the fumes of the battery because of the danger they will corrode/damage the inverter. It suggest locating the inverter on the floor of the vehicle (but how you do that with 90cm leads supplied beats me)

Having said all that, it does look ok and appears to be made by the same company that have made similar (smaller) versions for the likes of Netto & Aldi in the past. If you want one, I doubt you'll beat it for the price. Maplin currently have a 600w one for £69.99 (but have sold there's in the past for as low as £29.99)
If you're looking for a smaller version, maplin currenly have their 300w inverter available for £19.99
http://www.maplin.co.uk/Module.aspx?ModuleNo=48723
#38
yes but look at the cost of true sine wave invertors £100 or more i am only running 99p low energy bulbs seem to be lasting ok .
My small 300 watt inverter
has 600 watt peak it runs 200 watt clippers no problem it has series ac motor in it not induction . Most phones and laptops are switch mode power supplys now and dont have transformers in them may be just a few chokes but its true what you say big inductive loads can be a problem with cheap inverters dont think it would 800 watt microwave would run of this lol big transformer to step up voltage for magnatron
#39
Premier
Actually, this is probably more to do with the type of output these cheap inverters produce rather than quantity.
The power rating quoted for inverters is the maximum continous power. e.g a 300W inverter is usually capable of producing 600w peak (i.e. for a short very period)
Mains electricity is output as a pure sine wave form
These cheap inverters produce a modified (stepped) sine wave output. More expensive inverters are available that produce pure sine wave outputs but these cost at least twice the price.
Whilst a modified sine wave (msw) output make no difference to appliances that have a resistive load (such as traditional light bulbs), it is not really suitable for appliances that have an inductive load (such as motors and low energy light bulbs) - just the things you are trying to use it for. Although the larger capacity msw inverter is apparently allowing you to run them, it possibly is causing damage to those appliances reducing their expected lifespan.

See here for a better explanation:yes but look at the cost of true sine wave invertors £100 or more i am only running 99p low energy bulbs seem to be lasting ok .
My small 300 watt inverter
has 600 watt peak it runs 200 watt clippers no problem it has series ac motor in it not induction . Most phones and laptops are switch mode power supplys now and dont have transformers in them may be just a few chokes but its true what you say big inductive loads can be a problem with cheap inverters dont think it would 800 watt microwave would run of this lol big transformer to step up voltage for magnatron also 800w is the out put not input.Also i would have thought 0.8 A quiesent current is a bit on high side my 600 watt maplin inverter only drawes 0.3 off load also 70% 0.8A may be inverter start up peak of load and 70% minimum
efficency seems a bit low if i run one 20 watt low energy bulb only drawing just over 21 watts off
12v battery if you just run resistive loads you be a bit limited to electric fires kettels and old light bulbs?? which would run batt down very fast .Also0.8A may be inverter start up peak off load and 70% minimum efficency
http://www.reuk.co.uk/Pure-Sine-Wave-Power-Inverters.htm
#40
andy math

...Also i would have thought 0.8 A quiesent current is a bit on high side my 600 watt maplin inverter only drawes 0.3 off load also 70% 0.8A may be inverter start up peak of load and 70% minimum

I too was surprised by the no load current specified as < 0.8A , that's why I originally thought about 0.4A - but I can't argue with the manufacturer's specification.
With regards the 70% efficiency - this again is used in the instructions. It is in the equation they use to quote what the battery must supply for the inverter to operate at 800w continuous load i.e. 95A
This inverter has a peak load capacity of 1200w as stated in the OP and confirmed in the manufacturer's specification.

With regards the maplin 600w inverter you have the manufacturer quotes a standby current of <0 .5A and an efficiency of >85% (I'm not sure where you got your figures from)
http://www.dc-ac.com/sp-600.htm
This link is supplied by maplin on their website for their inverter under faq.
Maplin inverters are sourced from a different manufacturer to the one Argos/Netto/Aldi appear to use.

andy mack
... if you just run resistive loads you be a bit limited to electric fires kettels and old light bulbs?? which would run batt down very fast .

You would be unable to run hardly any electric fires or kettles with this 800w inverter as the load required would far exceed what for this inverter can supply.

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