Professionals: Cheap, concentrated, effective weedkiller (works on almost all weeds) - Roundup-style Glyphosate - 5L (makes 150+ litres weedkiller) (free 750ml rose insecticide) £24.50 delivered eBay (Soil Fertility Solutions) - HotUKDeals
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Professionals: Cheap, concentrated, effective weedkiller (works on almost all weeds) - Roundup-style Glyphosate - 5L (makes 150+ litres weedkiller) (free 750ml rose insecticide) £24.50 delivered eBay (Soil Fertility Solutions)

£24.50 @ eBay
Gallup 360 is a systemic industrial weed killer for the control of most broadleaved weeds and grasses in amenity and industrial situations, forestry and aquatic areas. Gallup 360 is a professional … Read More
Newbold Avatar
3m, 6d agoFound 3 months, 6 days ago
Gallup 360 is a systemic industrial weed killer for the control of most broadleaved weeds and grasses in amenity and industrial situations, forestry and aquatic areas.

Gallup 360 is a professional product and the end user needs pa6 knapsack sprayer certification to apply

For use only as a herbicide for the control of annual and perennial grass and broad-leaved weeds in stubbles, set aside, orchards, forestry, and non-crop areas, and for pre-harvest use in cereals, oilseed rape and linseed.

Key benefits of Gallup360:

Excellent performance
Non-selective industrial weed killer, non-residual
Flexible application rates
Wide range of applications
Controls a wide variety of annual and perennial weed species
Systemic activity gives effective control of roots, shoots and leaves.

Safe Use of Pesticides

"By law, everyone who uses pesticides professionally must have received adequate training in using pesticides safely and be skilled in the job they are carrying out."

Upon purchasing this product you and/or the end users are responsibile for ensuring that these products are used in line with industry Approved Codes of Practice. All operators must be trained and certificated in using and applying any Ministry Approved Professional Product (MAPP).

Use plant protection products safely. Always read the label and product information before use.

Please be aware that by proceeding you are purchasing a professional pesticide product. You must ensure the end user of these products complies with the DEFRA/HSE Code for the Safe use of Pesticides.

There are legal responsibilities covering the storage and use of professional use pesticides. These responsibilities are covered by The Food and Environment Protection Act 1985 (FEPA) and Control of Pesticide Regulations 1986 (COPR).
Deal Tags:
Newbold Avatar
3m, 6d agoFound 3 months, 6 days ago
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(38) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
Link awaiting correction by Mods. :)


Edited By: Newbold on Mar 19, 2017 16:32: Link
[mod][Mod Team] 1 Like #2
Deal link fixed :)
#3
Awesome stuff. Heat added.
1 Like #4
I think this deal is best left to those that have the safety equipment and sprayer
"Gallup 360 is a professional product and the end user needs pa6 knapsack sprayer certification to apply"
#5
niceroundpound
Deal link fixed :)
Thanks! ;)
#6
used this before and its great stuff
#7
First bought it as recommended by a farmer, now use it all the time.
4 Likes #8
Just before you go and buy this. I should point out this is a commercial product not for home use and as such does not have a child proof lid, so it needs to be kept in protective enclosure and protected from frost. It is foolhardy to promote these products on a consumer website. II know Besford will object to my comments he always does but this is genuine advice. If you have had adequate training in the handling and application of herbicides then great otherwise steer clear of this dangerous chemical, it is a liability that should be left to the professionals. Sorry in advance for any grammatical errors.
1 Like #9
I used this and looked around the next day and thought that it hadn't worked...... so I went round and sprayed everything again.....the end result ended up in my garden looking like a nuclear holocaust had taken place.....handle with care.(_;)
1 Like #10
Sounds good.... might get some for the wife
#11
Good stuff this.
2 Likes #12
nougat
Just before you go and buy this. I should point out this is a commercial product not for home use and as such does not have a child proof lid, so it needs to be kept in protective enclosure and protected from frost. It is foolhardy to promote these products on a consumer website. II know Besford will object to my comments he always does but this is genuine advice. If you have had adequate training in the handling and application of herbicides then great otherwise steer clear of this dangerous chemical, it is a liability that should be left to the professionals. Sorry in advance for any grammatical errors.
I've been using this for years following a link published here I think. I don't have children but I have dogs and a pond. I have a proper knapsack sprayer and I'm careful to be upwind of the spray if I have to spray on the windy day. The farmers round here don't seem to be so careful when they spray!
If you have better things to do with your life than spending it hoeing and weeding, and don't want to be penalized by buying small amounts of well diluted glyphosphate, this is the answer
But I missed out on the free Rose insecticide, though if it is simply soap solution, they can keep it!


Edited By: jasee on Mar 19, 2017 17:12: spelling
4 Likes #13
For all the suburban scaremongering comments about how it's a professional product, it's simple.

Apply common sense.

If you're unsure of a product and scared of it's potential destruction capabilities (huge) and how to store it, don't buy or use it.

Be it a cordless drill, a mobile phone from China or weedkiller.

Take responsibility and use the brain you were given!
1 Like #14
This is great stuff, I got it in the bottom of me shoes then walked across the garden, had dead grass in the shape of foot prints!!! Takes a week to kick in but works a treat. As per all stuff like this don't be a moron and leave it around kids and dogs and you'll be fine. People moaning because this is not home use crap are obviously part of the H&S police.
#15
sprayed a load of weeds with this after 2 days no difference thought what a waste of money. looked again after a week and it looked like a nuclear warhead has hit it!
1 Like #16
Great stuff.

Few tips,

For stubborn weeds add a drop of washing up liquid into the mix. It helps the liquid penetrate and remain on the leaf.

This will kill all weeds but requires them to be growing. The faster the weeds are growing the faster this will work. Give it a week to work before attacking them with a strimmer etc.

It must come into contact with the weeds leaf to be absorbed. Spraying it where there are currently no weeds or at soil will do absolutely nothing.
The product is effectivley neutralised as it enters soil.

This is a non selective herbicide meaning it will kill anything including your lawn and your wives dafodils. Just be carefull with overspray and transfer by foot until dry.


If you have a massive weed problem or are just a bit of a pyromaniac then think about the Sheen X300. Great fun.


Edited By: callum84 on Mar 19, 2017 19:49: .
2 Likes #17
Further to earlier replies, I'm afraid that it's more than simply common sense that is required - the law changed a couple of years ago. It is labelled as a professional use product so that potential buyers are alerted to the status of the product. The buyer must be able to show that the end user has a certificate of competence or is working under the direct supervision of someone who has. Have a look at the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/topics/using-pesticides/general/faq-agricultural-use-of-pesticides.htm .
#18
this stuff is great but as said things to note,its slow acting & it doesn't prevent weeds growing back
#19
rob1987hughes
This is great stuff, I got it in the bottom of me shoes then walked across the garden, had dead grass in the shape of foot prints!!! Takes a week to kick in but works a treat. As per all stuff like this don't be a moron and leave it around kids and dogs and you'll be fine. People moaning because this is not home use crap are obviously part of the H&S police.

I'm not moaning but giving positive advice about a dangerous product in it's commercial form not intended for consumer use and If my comment has educated someone that didn't know exactly what they were proposing to buy then that was my intention. The fact that this size of container could be left in a garage or shed for years and forgotten about is the danger of a consumer buying a bulk commercial product which has no secure cap. I'm not H&S Police but grew up on my Dads farm and went to Agricultural College for a few years.

scathel
For all the suburban scaremongering comments about how it's a professional product, it's simple.
Apply common sense.
If you're unsure of a product and scared of it's potential destruction capabilities (huge) and how to store it, don't buy or use it.
Be it a cordless drill, a mobile phone from China or weedkiller.
Take responsibility and use the brain you were given!
I
I'm unsure what the demographics have to do with scaremongering. How much common sense does an average 10 year old have when they find a drum of Gallup with a lid they can easily open.
1 Like #20
Anon0990
Further to earlier replies, I'm afraid that it's more than simply common sense that is required - the law changed a couple of years ago. It is labelled as a professional use product so that potential buyers are alerted to the status of the product. The buyer must be able to show that the end user has a certificate of competence or is working under the direct supervision of someone who has. Have a look at the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/topics/using-pesticides/general/faq-agricultural-use-of-pesticides.htm .
The laws changed through EU intereference. Glyphosphate is the only product left for consumer use.
This is a concentrated form of what you find in garden centres for ridiculous prices.

Your link is for agricultural use. HSE talks about those who use pesticides as part of employment should be trained.

Nanny state at its finest! Surprised people dont just throw diesel down.

They sell caustic soda in asda FFS and people worrying about some glyphosphate.

Were all bloody doomed!






Edited By: callum84 on Mar 19, 2017 20:03
#21
jasee
nougat
Just before you go and buy this. I should point out this is a commercial product not for home use and as such does not have a child proof lid, so it needs to be kept in protective enclosure and protected from frost. It is foolhardy to promote these products on a consumer website. II know Besford will object to my comments he always does but this is genuine advice. If you have had adequate training in the handling and application of herbicides then great otherwise steer clear of this dangerous chemical, it is a liability that should be left to the professionals. Sorry in advance for any grammatical errors.
I've been using this for years following a link published here I think. I don't have children but I have dogs and a pond. I have a proper knapsack sprayer and I'm careful to be upwind of the spray if I have to spray on the windy day. The farmers round here don't seem to be so careful when they spray!
If you have better things to do with your life than spending it hoeing and weeding, and don't want to be penalized by buying small amounts of well diluted glyphosphate, this is the answer
But I missed out on the free Rose insecticide, though if it is simply soap solution, they can keep it!
You shouldn't spray on a windy day!

Edited By: nougat on Mar 19, 2017 20:05
#22
callum84
Anon0990
Further to earlier replies, I'm afraid that it's more than simply common sense that is required - the law changed a couple of years ago. It is labelled as a professional use product so that potential buyers are alerted to the status of the product. The buyer must be able to show that the end user has a certificate of competence or is working under the direct supervision of someone who has. Have a look at the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/topics/using-pesticides/general/faq-agricultural-use-of-pesticides.htm .
The laws changed through EU intereference. Glyphosphate is the only product left for consumer use.
This is a concentrated form of what you find in garden centres for ridiculous prices.

Your link is for agricultural use. HSE talks about those who use pesticides as part of employment should be trained.

Nanny state at its finest! Surprised people dont just throw diesel down.

They sell caustic soda in asda FFS and people worrying about some glyphosphate.
This product is for agricultural use!

Edited By: nougat on Mar 19, 2017 20:04
1 Like #23
nougat
callum84
Anon0990
Further to earlier replies, I'm afraid that it's more than simply common sense that is required - the law changed a couple of years ago. It is labelled as a professional use product so that potential buyers are alerted to the status of the product. The buyer must be able to show that the end user has a certificate of competence or is working under the direct supervision of someone who has. Have a look at the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/topics/using-pesticides/general/faq-agricultural-use-of-pesticides.htm .
The laws changed through EU intereference. Glyphosphate is the only product left for consumer use.
This is a concentrated form of what you find in garden centres for ridiculous prices.
Your link is for agricultural use. HSE talks about those who use pesticides as part of employment should be trained.
Nanny state at its finest! Surprised people dont just throw diesel down.
They sell caustic soda in asda FFS and people worrying about some glyphosphate.
This product is for agricultural use!
Do you have any idea what your talking about mate?

Gallup 360 5l contains 360g/l of glyphosphate.
Gallup home and garden 1l also contains 360g/l of glyphosphate.

The only difference is 5l bottle is not marketed as home. Its the exact same stuff.




Edited By: callum84 on Mar 19, 2017 20:16
#24
callum84
Anon0990
Further to earlier replies, I'm afraid that it's more than simply common sense that is required - the law changed a couple of years ago. It is labelled as a professional use product so that potential buyers are alerted to the status of the product. The buyer must be able to show that the end user has a certificate of competence or is working under the direct supervision of someone who has. Have a look at the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/topics/using-pesticides/general/faq-agricultural-use-of-pesticides.htm .
The laws changed through EU intereference. Glyphosphate is the only product left for consumer use.
This is a concentrated form of what you find in garden centres for ridiculous prices.
Your link is for agricultural use. HSE talks about those who use pesticides as part of employment should be trained.
Nanny state at its finest! Surprised people dont just throw diesel down.
They sell caustic soda in asda FFS and people worrying about some glyphosphate.
Were all fecking doomed!

callum84
Anon0990
Further to earlier replies, I'm afraid that it's more than simply common sense that is required - the law changed a couple of years ago. It is labelled as a professional use product so that potential buyers are alerted to the status of the product. The buyer must be able to show that the end user has a certificate of competence or is working under the direct supervision of someone who has. Have a look at the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/topics/using-pesticides/general/faq-agricultural-use-of-pesticides.htm .
The laws changed through EU intereference. Glyphosphate is the only product left for consumer use.
This is a concentrated form of what you find in garden centres for ridiculous prices.
Your link is for agricultural use. HSE talks about those who use pesticides as part of employment should be trained.
Nanny state at its finest! Surprised people dont just throw diesel down.
They sell caustic soda in asda FFS and people worrying about some glyphosphate.
Were all fecking doomed!

callum84
Anon0990
Further to earlier replies, I'm afraid that it's more than simply common sense that is required - the law changed a couple of years ago. It is labelled as a professional use product so that potential buyers are alerted to the status of the product. The buyer must be able to show that the end user has a certificate of competence or is working under the direct supervision of someone who has. Have a look at the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/topics/using-pesticides/general/faq-agricultural-use-of-pesticides.htm .
The laws changed through EU intereference. Glyphosphate is the only product left for consumer use.
This is a concentrated form of what you find in garden centres for ridiculous prices.
Your link is for agricultural use. HSE talks about those who use pesticides as part of employment should be trained.
Nanny state at its finest! Surprised people dont just throw diesel down.
They sell caustic soda in asda FFS and people worrying about some glyphosphate.
Were all fecking doomed!

The link is for agricultural/horticultural use because the HSE advice is clear as to Amateur/Professional use (cut and pasted below). The law allows no "amateur" use.

[i]Amateur' and 'Professional' use
Most of the pesticides that you can use in the home, garden or allotment are approved for amateur use. This means that you do not need specific training to use these products. The label will be worded so that the instructions are easy to follow, to ensure that the product is used safely. These products are most likely to be found in your local garden centre, DIY store or supermarket.

Many other pesticides, such as those used on farms, or in public areas are approved for use in much larger commercial situations. The labels of these 'professional' products can be more complicated, and by law must only be used by those who have had the appropriate training. Professional products should never be used by the untrained amateur gardener. Someone with the right training can use a professional product in the home, garden or allotment so long as the intended use appears on the label.

For further information on whether you can use Professional Products in your garden, please see the following link to a page of Frequently Asked Questions on the use of Professional Products: Link to FAQ on Agricultural / Horticultural / Amenity Use of Pesticides (see particularly Question 8)
#25
Anon0990
callum84
Anon0990
Further to earlier replies, I'm afraid that it's more than simply common sense that is required - the law changed a couple of years ago. It is labelled as a professional use product so that potential buyers are alerted to the status of the product. The buyer must be able to show that the end user has a certificate of competence or is working under the direct supervision of someone who has. Have a look at the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/topics/using-pesticides/general/faq-agricultural-use-of-pesticides.htm .
The laws changed through EU intereference. Glyphosphate is the only product left for consumer use.
This is a concentrated form of what you find in garden centres for ridiculous prices.
Your link is for agricultural use. HSE talks about those who use pesticides as part of employment should be trained.
Nanny state at its finest! Surprised people dont just throw diesel down.
They sell caustic soda in asda FFS and people worrying about some glyphosphate.
Were all fecking doomed!
callum84
Anon0990
Further to earlier replies, I'm afraid that it's more than simply common sense that is required - the law changed a couple of years ago. It is labelled as a professional use product so that potential buyers are alerted to the status of the product. The buyer must be able to show that the end user has a certificate of competence or is working under the direct supervision of someone who has. Have a look at the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/topics/using-pesticides/general/faq-agricultural-use-of-pesticides.htm .
The laws changed through EU intereference. Glyphosphate is the only product left for consumer use.
This is a concentrated form of what you find in garden centres for ridiculous prices.
Your link is for agricultural use. HSE talks about those who use pesticides as part of employment should be trained.
Nanny state at its finest! Surprised people dont just throw diesel down.
They sell caustic soda in asda FFS and people worrying about some glyphosphate.
Were all fecking doomed!
callum84
Anon0990
Further to earlier replies, I'm afraid that it's more than simply common sense that is required - the law changed a couple of years ago. It is labelled as a professional use product so that potential buyers are alerted to the status of the product. The buyer must be able to show that the end user has a certificate of competence or is working under the direct supervision of someone who has. Have a look at the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/topics/using-pesticides/general/faq-agricultural-use-of-pesticides.htm .
The laws changed through EU intereference. Glyphosphate is the only product left for consumer use.
This is a concentrated form of what you find in garden centres for ridiculous prices.
Your link is for agricultural use. HSE talks about those who use pesticides as part of employment should be trained.
Nanny state at its finest! Surprised people dont just throw diesel down.
They sell caustic soda in asda FFS and people worrying about some glyphosphate.
Were all fecking doomed!
The link is for agricultural/horticultural use because the HSE advice is clear as to Amateur/Professional use (cut and pasted below). The law allows no "amateur" use.
[i]Amateur' and 'Professional' use
Most of the pesticides that you can use in the home, garden or allotment are approved for amateur use. This means that you do not need specific training to use these products. The label will be worded so that the instructions are easy to follow, to ensure that the product is used safely. These products are most likely to be found in your local garden centre, DIY store or supermarket.
Many other pesticides, such as those used on farms, or in public areas are approved for use in much larger commercial situations. The labels of these 'professional' products can be more complicated, and by law must only be used by those who have had the appropriate training. Professional products should never be used by the untrained amateur gardener. Someone with the right training can use a professional product in the home, garden or allotment so long as the intended use appears on the label.
For further information on whether you can use Professional Products in your garden, please see the following link to a page of Frequently Asked Questions on the use of Professional Products: Link to FAQ on Agricultural / Horticultural / Amenity Use of Pesticides (see particularly Question 8)
Ok show me where Glyphosphate is restricted from amateur use?

Why do they produce a 1l version for home and garden with same chemical composition as 5l gallup?

You can buy concentrated glyphosphate in B&Q in small saches for ridiculous prices.

I appreciate your trying to protect people but on this occasion I feel its a bit over the top.
#26
callum84
nougat
callum84
Anon0990
Further to earlier replies, I'm afraid that it's more than simply common sense that is required - the law changed a couple of years ago. It is labelled as a professional use product so that potential buyers are alerted to the status of the product. The buyer must be able to show that the end user has a certificate of competence or is working under the direct supervision of someone who has. Have a look at the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/topics/using-pesticides/general/faq-agricultural-use-of-pesticides.htm .
The laws changed through EU intereference. Glyphosphate is the only product left for consumer use.
This is a concentrated form of what you find in garden centres for ridiculous prices.
Your link is for agricultural use. HSE talks about those who use pesticides as part of employment should be trained.
Nanny state at its finest! Surprised people dont just throw diesel down.
They sell caustic soda in asda FFS and people worrying about some glyphosphate.
This product is for agricultural use!
Do you have any idea what your talking about mate?
Gallup 360 5l contains 360g/l of glyphosphate.
Gallup home and garden 1l also contains 360g/l of glyphosphate.
The only difference is 5l bottle is not marketed as home. Its the exact same stuff.
Yep you're right. You caught me out there. Please disregard my comments this is a consumer product. They are selling it on ebay so it must be okay. Fill your kitchen cupboards at this price.

Edited By: nougat on Mar 19, 2017 20:33
1 Like #27
Same price on Amazon
1 Like #28
callum84
Anon0990
callum84
Anon0990
Further to earlier replies, I'm afraid that it's more than simply common sense that is required - the law changed a couple of years ago. It is labelled as a professional use product so that potential buyers are alerted to the status of the product. The buyer must be able to show that the end user has a certificate of competence or is working under the direct supervision of someone who has. Have a look at the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/topics/using-pesticides/general/faq-agricultural-use-of-pesticides.htm .
The laws changed through EU intereference. Glyphosphate is the only product left for consumer use.
This is a concentrated form of what you find in garden centres for ridiculous prices.
Your link is for agricultural use. HSE talks about those who use pesticides as part of employment should be trained.
Nanny state at its finest! Surprised people dont just throw diesel down.
They sell caustic soda in asda FFS and people worrying about some glyphosphate.
Were all fecking doomed!
callum84
Anon0990
Further to earlier replies, I'm afraid that it's more than simply common sense that is required - the law changed a couple of years ago. It is labelled as a professional use product so that potential buyers are alerted to the status of the product. The buyer must be able to show that the end user has a certificate of competence or is working under the direct supervision of someone who has. Have a look at the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/topics/using-pesticides/general/faq-agricultural-use-of-pesticides.htm .
The laws changed through EU intereference. Glyphosphate is the only product left for consumer use.
This is a concentrated form of what you find in garden centres for ridiculous prices.
Your link is for agricultural use. HSE talks about those who use pesticides as part of employment should be trained.
Nanny state at its finest! Surprised people dont just throw diesel down.
They sell caustic soda in asda FFS and people worrying about some glyphosphate.
Were all fecking doomed!
callum84
Anon0990
Further to earlier replies, I'm afraid that it's more than simply common sense that is required - the law changed a couple of years ago. It is labelled as a professional use product so that potential buyers are alerted to the status of the product. The buyer must be able to show that the end user has a certificate of competence or is working under the direct supervision of someone who has. Have a look at the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/topics/using-pesticides/general/faq-agricultural-use-of-pesticides.htm .
The laws changed through EU intereference. Glyphosphate is the only product left for consumer use.
This is a concentrated form of what you find in garden centres for ridiculous prices.
Your link is for agricultural use. HSE talks about those who use pesticides as part of employment should be trained.
Nanny state at its finest! Surprised people dont just throw diesel down.
They sell caustic soda in asda FFS and people worrying about some glyphosphate.
Were all fecking doomed!
The link is for agricultural/horticultural use because the HSE advice is clear as to Amateur/Professional use (cut and pasted below). The law allows no "amateur" use.
[i]Amateur' and 'Professional' use
Most of the pesticides that you can use in the home, garden or allotment are approved for amateur use. This means that you do not need specific training to use these products. The label will be worded so that the instructions are easy to follow, to ensure that the product is used safely. These products are most likely to be found in your local garden centre, DIY store or supermarket.
Many other pesticides, such as those used on farms, or in public areas are approved for use in much larger commercial situations. The labels of these 'professional' products can be more complicated, and by law must only be used by those who have had the appropriate training. Professional products should never be used by the untrained amateur gardener. Someone with the right training can use a professional product in the home, garden or allotment so long as the intended use appears on the label.
For further information on whether you can use Professional Products in your garden, please see the following link to a page of Frequently Asked Questions on the use of Professional Products: Link to FAQ on Agricultural / Horticultural / Amenity Use of Pesticides (see particularly Question 8)
Ok show me where Glyphosphate is restricted from amateur use?
Why do they produce a 1l version for home and garden with same chemical composition as 5l gallup?
You can buy concentrated glyphosphate in B&Q in small saches for ridiculous prices.
I appreciate your trying to protect people but on this occasion I feel its a bit over the top.


Glyphosate is not banned from amateur use. Whether or not we like it, the legislation is there to stop people buying it easily in bulk packs. Whether by amateur or professional, it needs to be treated with respect. And a small number of users, statistically more likely to be the amateur users, won't do so. But you can't legislate against stupid. I don't think there is usefully anything more to be said.
#29
Confused by the 150+ liters when I was use this I use to mix it at 100 to 1 in a knapsack & push-along for carparks and it would kill everything. 5000 liters. £24.50 is about avg. Saying that I have seen it about £21 to £22 at times.
#30
Anon0990
callum84
Anon0990
callum84
Anon0990
Further to earlier replies, I'm afraid that it's more than simply common sense that is required - the law changed a couple of years ago. It is labelled as a professional use product so that potential buyers are alerted to the status of the product. The buyer must be able to show that the end user has a certificate of competence or is working under the direct supervision of someone who has. Have a look at the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/topics/using-pesticides/general/faq-agricultural-use-of-pesticides.htm .
The laws changed through EU intereference. Glyphosphate is the only product left for consumer use.
This is a concentrated form of what you find in garden centres for ridiculous prices.
Your link is for agricultural use. HSE talks about those who use pesticides as part of employment should be trained.
Nanny state at its finest! Surprised people dont just throw diesel down.
They sell caustic soda in asda FFS and people worrying about some glyphosphate.
Were all fecking doomed!
callum84
Anon0990
Further to earlier replies, I'm afraid that it's more than simply common sense that is required - the law changed a couple of years ago. It is labelled as a professional use product so that potential buyers are alerted to the status of the product. The buyer must be able to show that the end user has a certificate of competence or is working under the direct supervision of someone who has. Have a look at the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/topics/using-pesticides/general/faq-agricultural-use-of-pesticides.htm .
The laws changed through EU intereference. Glyphosphate is the only product left for consumer use.
This is a concentrated form of what you find in garden centres for ridiculous prices.
Your link is for agricultural use. HSE talks about those who use pesticides as part of employment should be trained.
Nanny state at its finest! Surprised people dont just throw diesel down.
They sell caustic soda in asda FFS and people worrying about some glyphosphate.
Were all fecking doomed!
callum84
Anon0990
Further to earlier replies, I'm afraid that it's more than simply common sense that is required - the law changed a couple of years ago. It is labelled as a professional use product so that potential buyers are alerted to the status of the product. The buyer must be able to show that the end user has a certificate of competence or is working under the direct supervision of someone who has. Have a look at the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pesticides/topics/using-pesticides/general/faq-agricultural-use-of-pesticides.htm .
The laws changed through EU intereference. Glyphosphate is the only product left for consumer use.
This is a concentrated form of what you find in garden centres for ridiculous prices.
Your link is for agricultural use. HSE talks about those who use pesticides as part of employment should be trained.
Nanny state at its finest! Surprised people dont just throw diesel down.
They sell caustic soda in asda FFS and people worrying about some glyphosphate.
Were all fecking doomed!
The link is for agricultural/horticultural use because the HSE advice is clear as to Amateur/Professional use (cut and pasted below). The law allows no "amateur" use.
Amateur' and 'Professional' use
Most of the pesticides that you can use in the home, garden or allotment are approved for amateur use. This means that you do not need specific training to use these products. The label will be worded so that the instructions are easy to follow, to ensure that the product is used safely. These products are most likely to be found in your local garden centre, DIY store or supermarket.
Many other pesticides, such as those used on farms, or in public areas are approved for use in much larger commercial situations. The labels of these 'professional' products can be more complicated, and by law must only be used by those who have had the appropriate training. Professional products should never be used by the untrained amateur gardener. Someone with the right training can use a professional product in the home, garden or allotment so long as the intended use appears on the label.
For further information on whether you can use Professional Products in your garden, please see the following link to a page of Frequently Asked Questions on the use of Professional Products: Link to FAQ on Agricultural / Horticultural / Amenity Use of Pesticides (see particularly Question 8)
Ok show me where Glyphosphate is restricted from amateur use?
Why do they produce a 1l version for home and garden with same chemical composition as 5l gallup?
You can buy concentrated glyphosphate in B&Q in small saches for ridiculous prices.
I appreciate your trying to protect people but on this occasion I feel its a bit over the top.
Glyphosate is not banned from amateur use. Whether or not we like it, the legislation is there to stop people buying it easily in bulk packs. Whether by amateur or professional, it needs to be treated with respect. And a small number of users, statistically more likely to be the amateur users, won't do so. But you can't legislate against stupid. I don't think there is usefully anything more to be said.
Thats fair enough. Not having a go at you, the full thing has angered me since it was introduced.

Effectivley the EU have decided you can purchase 1L or 5x1L but you cant have a 5L bottle.

Its ridiculous considering glyphosphate is pretty safe as herbicides or even chemicals go.

Sodium hypochlorite (bleach) is effectivley more dangerous than glyphosphate and kills weeds just as well. Bleach has larger enviromental issues though but is where consumers will be pushed.

Average joe can walk into a supermarket and buy a bottle of Sodium Hydroxide which can cause horrific burns and blindness.

If packages are marked with appropriate warnings and instructions we need to trust that they have the brains to read them.

By all mean make people aware of enviromental, COSH and saftety data but dont make glyphosphate out to be more hazerdous than it actually is. (Eu not you personally)

[i]Edited By: callum84 on Mar 19, 2017 21:59
#31
callum84
Great stuff.

Few tips,

For stubborn weeds add a drop of washing up liquid into the mix. It helps the liquid penetrate and remain on the leaf.

This will kill all weeds but requires them to be growing. The faster the weeds are growing the faster this will work. Give it a week to work before attacking them with a strimmer etc.

It must come into contact with the weeds leaf to be absorbed. Spraying it where there are currently no weeds or at soil will do absolutely nothing.
The product is effectivley neutralised as it enters soil.

This is a non selective herbicide meaning it will kill anything including your lawn and your wives dafodils. Just be carefull with overspray and transfer by foot until dry.


If you have a massive weed problem or are just a bit of a pyromaniac then think about the Sheen X300. Great fun.



This is better http://m.ebay.co.uk/itm/5lt-WEEDKILLER-GLYPHOSATE-GOLD-ULTRA-EX-VERY-STRONG-PROFESSIONAL-ROUND-UP-/252812856010?txnId=2018529962015, has a really good surfactant that helps leaf penetration already in.
#32
will it affect block paving. been using patio magic on it and its good but i have a 450sqft driveway and its takes ages to clear the moss out.
#33
essexgangsta
will it affect block paving. been using patio magic on it and its good but i have a 450sqft driveway and its takes ages to clear the moss out.
Patio magic is good on litchen and algae but not great on moss unless used in high concetration

Moss is a nightmare to remove unless its dead.

Scrub bleach into block paving at a ratio of 3parts water to 1 part bleach.

The bleach kills off moss within a few days, it will discoulour and literally lose its grip.

Also kills algae and any weeds as effectivley as glyphosphate.

Bleach can also have a residual pre emergent effect as lowers PH of soil making it temporarily inhospitable to growth.

Im not suggesting anyone use bleach as a weedkiller, just suggesting its a good solution for block paving.

Test a small area first.
#34
This is the best on the market . Takes 5 to 7 days to kill , but it kills the lot . I actually mixed it a little stronger than the recommended ratio. Better than spending money on the B&Q stuff that never works .
#35
gazdoubleu
callum84
Great stuff.
Few tips,
For stubborn weeds add a drop of washing up liquid into the mix. It helps the liquid penetrate and remain on the leaf.
This will kill all weeds but requires them to be growing. The faster the weeds are growing the faster this will work. Give it a week to work before attacking them with a strimmer etc.
It must come into contact with the weeds leaf to be absorbed. Spraying it where there are currently no weeds or at soil will do absolutely nothing.
The product is effectivley neutralised as it enters soil.
This is a non selective herbicide meaning it will kill anything including your lawn and your wives dafodils. Just be carefull with overspray and transfer by foot until dry.
If you have a massive weed problem or are just a bit of a pyromaniac then think about the Sheen X300. Great fun.
This is better http://m.ebay.co.uk/itm/5lt-WEEDKILLER-GLYPHOSATE-GOLD-ULTRA-EX-VERY-STRONG-PROFESSIONAL-ROUND-UP-/252812856010?txnId=2018529962015, has a really good surfactant that helps leaf penetration already in.

I've just ordered some of this actually
#36
callum84
essexgangsta
will it affect block paving. been using patio magic on it and its good but i have a 450sqft driveway and its takes ages to clear the moss out.
Patio magic is good on litchen and algae but not great on moss unless used in high concetration
Moss is a nightmare to remove unless its dead.
Scrub bleach into block paving at a ratio of 3parts water to 1 part bleach.
The bleach kills off moss within a few days, it will discoulour and literally lose its grip.
Also kills algae and any weeds as effectivley as glyphosphate.
Bleach can also have a residual pre emergent effect as lowers PH of soil making it temporarily inhospitable to growth.
Im not suggesting anyone use bleach as a weedkiller, just suggesting its a good solution for block paving.
Test a small area first.
thanks, ive just bought one of those v shape brushes to get the moss out, trouble is its never ending. perhaps the extra money on sealing the driveway would have been money well spent.
#37
Excellent weedkiller.
Wear appropriate PPE equipment when using this weedkiller.
Also keep your pets well away from this stuff after first use for a few days at least.
Best to apply when dry, no frost and not windy and no rain forecast for at least a few days ahead after first use or it will get washed away by the rain.
Heat to Op
#38
Great stuff, killed all the rag weed in my garden, shop stuff didn't touch it.

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