Quorn Chef's Selection Meat Free Classic Burgers (2 per pack - 180g) ONLY £1.00 @ Asda - HotUKDeals
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Quorn Chef's Selection Meat Free Classic Burgers (2 per pack - 180g) ONLY £1.00 @ Asda

£1.00 @ Asda
Quorn Chef's Selection Meat Free Classic Burgers (2 per pack - 180g) ONLY £1.00 Allergy Advice Contains: Barley, Wheat, Eggs, Milk. Mycoprotein is high in protein and fibre which may cause in… Read More
rubberbullets Avatar
10m, 2w agoFound 10 months, 2 weeks ago
Quorn Chef's Selection Meat Free Classic Burgers (2 per pack - 180g) ONLY £1.00

Allergy Advice

Contains: Barley, Wheat, Eggs, Milk.

Mycoprotein is high in protein and fibre which may cause intolerance in some people.

Ingredients

Mycoprotein (38%) , Textured Wheat Protein (Wheat Flour, Stabiliser: Sodium Alginate: Colour: Plain Caramel) , Rehydrated Free Range Egg White , Vegetable Oils (Palm, Rapeseed) , Onions , Flavourings (contain Smoked Yeast, Potassium Chloride & Smoke Flavourings) , Milk Proteins , Roasted Barley Malt Extract , Firming Agents: Calcium Chloride, Calcium Acetate

Waitrose are £2.50 now reduced to 2 for £3.00

Tesco are £2.50 now reduced to 3 for £5.00
rubberbullets Avatar
10m, 2w agoFound 10 months, 2 weeks ago
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(11) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
#2
Quorn is also loaded with salt..not so good.
#3
Splodger101
Quorn is also loaded with salt..not so good.

Nutritional Values
Typical values (as sold) Per 100g
Energy 760kJ
182kcal
Fat 8.2g
of which saturates 3.2g
Carbohydrate 9.8g
of which sugars 1.9g
Fibre 3.9g
Protein 18.0g
Salt 1.5g
No. of servings: 2
#4
Salt and sodium in your food

Salt is also called sodium chloride. Sometimes, food labels only give the figure for sodium. But there is a simple way to work out how much salt you are eating from the sodium figure:

Salt = sodium x 2.5

Adults should eat no more than 2.4g of sodium per day, as this is equal to 6g of salt.
#5
Splodger101
Quorn is also loaded with salt..not so good.
-_- no it's not..
#6
I beg to differ...oO I have border-line high blood pressure... GP says avoid ...
NitrousUK
Splodger101
Quorn is also loaded with salt..not so good.
-_- no it's not..


Edited By: Splodger101 on Sep 10, 2016 19:19
#7
Splodger101
I beg to differ...oO I have border-line high blood pressure... GP says avoid ...
NitrousUK
Splodger101
Quorn is also loaded with salt..not so good.
-_- no it's not..
Sorry to say but that Clare Jones is an utter moron. She makes no distinction whatsoever on the types of protein, fat, or carbohydrates. Which is critically important. Some are good, some are bad, in all categories. All she does is just compare numbers on the nutrition label, which any moron can do.
Also note her "qualification" is from some commercial entity, not a university, where it is probably impossible to fail if you've paid your fees.

The NHS recommended daily RDA of salt is 6g. Per burger is 1.35g. So a small fraction of a daily dose for a normal healthy person.
#8
Ah well, I will bow to your obvious greater knowledge.... the NHS daily intake of sal/sodium is dependent on individual circumstances. I require a low-sodium diet. Quorn isn't part of it. I should have made myself clearer..apologies, epic fail on my part but I shan't worry. Bye.
#9
Splodger101
Ah well, I will bow to your obvious greater knowledge.... the NHS daily intake of sal/sodium is dependent on individual circumstances. I require a low-sodium diet. Quorn isn't part of it. I should have made myself clearer..apologies, epic fail on my part but I shan't worry. Bye.
No need to apologise. Nutrition is a very complex area, and there's no end of misinformation out there from people who pretend to be informed ("Dr" Gillian McKeith is a prime example) and it's hard to filter. I am only informed because of many years of concerted effort. Even many GPs aren't particularly clued up.

The thing to look out for in addition to the label numbers, is amino acid profile for protein. You want a good spread so you're not missing any, ideally a bit of all of them. That is classed as a "complete" amino acid profile, which Quorn (or rather mycoprotein) does have. I don't know about lentils..

Regarding fat, unsaturated is generally better. Though some forms of saturated can be good for you, such as medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), commonly found in coconuts. Though even with unsaturated fats, you want a favourable omega profile. So not too much omega 6 to omega 3. iirc 1:6 of 3 to 6 or better is ideal. Various cooking oils have varying ratios, but one of the reasons olive oil is good is because of its ratio.

Regarding carbs, fibre can be classed in there and fibre is very good for you. Things to avoid are simple sugars, like glucose, and starches.

If you want to know more, I thoroughly recommend Ray Kurzweils book. It has a bit of a far fetched hook, "live long enough to live forever", but it's just something to motivate you. It's full of very detailed and scientifically supported advice.
Or if you want to check out individual foods, SelfNutritionData website is pretty amazing.


Edited By: NitrousUK on Sep 11, 2016 15:28: typo
#10
NitrousUK
Splodger101
Ah well, I will bow to your obvious greater knowledge.... the NHS daily intake of sal/sodium is dependent on individual circumstances. I require a low-sodium diet. Quorn isn't part of it. I should have made myself clearer..apologies, epic fail on my part but I shan't worry. Bye.
No need to apologise. Nutrition is a very complex area, and there's no end of misinformation out there from people who pretend to be informed ("Dr" Gillian McKeith is a prime example) and it's hard to filter. I am only informed because of many years of concerted effort. Even many GPs aren't particularly clued up.
The thing to look out for in addition to the label numbers, is amino acid profile for protein. You want a good spread so you're not missing any, ideally a bit of all of them. That is classed as a "complete" amino acid profile, which Quorn (or rather mycoprotein) does have. I don't know about lentils..
Regarding fat, unsaturated is generally better. Though some forms of saturated can be good for you, such as medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), commonly found in coconuts. Though even with unsaturated fats, you want a favourable omega profile. So not too much omega 6 to omega 3. iirc 1:6 of 3 to 6 or better is deal. Various cooking oils have varying ratios, but one of the reasons olive oil is good is because of its ratio.
Regarding carbs, fibre can be classed in there and fibre is very good for you. Things to avoid are simple sugars, like glucose, and starches.
If you want to know more, I thoroughly recommend Ray Kurzweils book. It has a bit of a far fetched hook, "live long enough to live forever", but it's just something to motivate you. It's full of very detailed and scientifically supported advice.
Or if you want to check out individual foods, SelfNutritionData website is pretty amazing.

Thanks for all of that I'm sure lots of people take heart from it!
#11
Some Quorn products taste or cardboard, so spread carefully and don't get attracted by the cheap prices.

Also worth reading about the potential drawbacks of GMO foods.

Quorn is highly processed and high in sodium, which can cause some health issues.

Anyway, I'm not against Quorn in any way, but just thought I'd highlight the obvious (which most of you know anyway).

I'll get my coat..

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