Quorn Meat Free Fillets (Gluten Free) (6 per pack - 312g) was £1.97 now £1.00 @ Morrisons - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HotUKDeals, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HotUKDeals app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit
269Expired

Quorn Meat Free Fillets (Gluten Free) (6 per pack - 312g) was £1.97 now £1.00 @ Morrisons

£1.00 @ Morrisons
These deals end Sunday 20th November Quorn Meat Free Fillets (Gluten Free) (6 per pack - 312g) was £1.97 now £1.00 (You need to add your own flavourings to make these edible. They are tasteless … Read More
rubberbullets Avatar
8m, 2w agoFound 8 months, 2 weeks ago
These deals end Sunday 20th November

Quorn Meat Free Fillets (Gluten Free) (6 per pack - 312g) was £1.97 now £1.00

(You need to add your own flavourings to make these edible. They are tasteless as they are.)

Ingredients

Allergy Advice: For allergens see highlighted ingredients

Mycoprotein (89%), Rehydrated Free Range Egg White, Natural Flavouring, Firming Agents: Calcium Chloride, Calcium Acetate, Gelling Agent: Pectin
Dietary Information

Free From Gluten

Quorn Meat Free Pieces 300g was £1.97 now £1.00

(You need to add your own flavourings to make these edible. They are tasteless as they are.)

Ingredients

Allergy Advice: For allergens see highlighted ingredients

Mycoprotein (95%), Rehydrated Free Range Egg White, Natural Flavouring, Firming Agents: Calcium Chloride, Calcium Acetate
Dietary Information

Contains Eggs and Gluten
×
Get the Hottest Deals Daily
Stay informed. Once a day, we'll send you the deals our members voted as the best.
Failed
rubberbullets Avatar
8m, 2w agoFound 8 months, 2 weeks ago
Options

All Comments

(22) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
quorn makes me bloat :(
1 Like #2
I don't get why they try to pretend it's meat? Also pretty sure calling them Chicken Fillets is false advertising.
#3
"Free from gluten" "contains eggs and gluten"

:|
#4
Wrap them in streaky bacon to add flavour.
#5
Quorn is mechanically recovered mycoprotein that's heavily processed that has big carbon footprint in processing compared to other natural protein sources especially vegetable proteins. I would just eat naturally grown beans, pulses and grains with natural flavorings and seasoning.
3 Likes #6
Carbonize
Also pretty sure calling them Chicken Fillets is false advertising.

Deffo mate, same as with hot dogs and fish fingers.
#7
Carbonize
I don't get why they try to pretend it's meat? Also pretty sure calling them Chicken Fillets is false advertising.
clearly says meat free...
#8
splender
Quorn is mechanically recovered mycoprotein that's heavily processed that has big carbon footprint in processing compared to other natural protein sources especially vegetable proteins. I would just eat naturally grown beans, pulses and grains with natural flavorings and seasoning.
"Processed" - verb -
* Perform a series of mechanical or chemical operations on (something) in order to change or preserve it.
* A word used to describe food by people who have read a blog and think they understand nutrition.

Care to provide any citation for the carbon footprint claim? As that's a new piece of FUD I haven't encountered yet.
#9
NitrousUK
splender
Quorn is mechanically recovered mycoprotein that's heavily processed that has big carbon footprint in processing compared to other natural protein sources especially vegetable proteins. I would just eat naturally grown beans, pulses and grains with natural flavorings and seasoning.
"Processed" - verb -
* Perform a series of mechanical or chemical operations on (something) in order to change or preserve it.
* A word used to describe food by people who have read a blog and think they understand nutrition.
Care to provide any citation for the carbon footprint claim? As that's a new piece of FUD I haven't encountered yet.
All production and energy usage processes are described here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quorn
1 Like #10
NitrousUK
splender
Quorn is mechanically recovered mycoprotein that's heavily processed that has big carbon footprint in processing compared to other natural protein sources especially vegetable proteins. I would just eat naturally grown beans, pulses and grains with natural flavorings and seasoning.
"Processed" - verb -
* Perform a series of mechanical or chemical operations on (something) in order to change or preserve it.
* A word used to describe food by people who have read a blog and think they understand nutrition.
Care to provide any citation for the carbon footprint claim? As that's a new piece of FUD I haven't encountered yet.
And its carbon footprint is detailed in the company's own report http://www.quorn.co.uk/~/media/quorn/downloads/sustainabilityreport.ashx
2 Likes #11
splender
Quorn is mechanically recovered mycoprotein that's heavily processed that has big carbon footprint in processing compared to other natural protein sources especially vegetable proteins. I would just eat naturally grown beans, pulses and grains with natural flavorings and seasoning.


Mechanically recovered, heavily processed, natural protein, naturally grown, natural flavourings. So mostly naturalistic logic with virtue signalling. :P

This is a meat alternative not a bean, grain etc alternative and the carbon footprint is less than livestock production, up to 90% less compared to beef. These products provide variety and can make the transition to stopping or reducing consumption of meat easier.
1 Like #12
splender
NitrousUK
splender
Quorn is mechanically recovered mycoprotein that's heavily processed that has big carbon footprint in processing compared to other natural protein sources especially vegetable proteins. I would just eat naturally grown beans, pulses and grains with natural flavorings and seasoning.
"Processed" - verb -
* Perform a series of mechanical or chemical operations on (something) in order to change or preserve it.
* A word used to describe food by people who have read a blog and think they understand nutrition.
Care to provide any citation for the carbon footprint claim? As that's a new piece of FUD I haven't encountered yet.
And its carbon footprint is detailed in the company's own report http://www.quorn.co.uk/~/media/quorn/downloads/sustainabilityreport.ashx
That says 90% less carbon footprint than meat...the product this is trying to replace, and the one you seem to be comparing by saying "especially vegetable proteins", implying meat sources. How is that by any stretch a "big" carbon footprint?
Last time I checked, 10% was smaller than 100%.
Does not make any bit of sense, but then FUD never does.

Edited By: NitrousUK on Nov 03, 2016 14:01
#13
NitrousUK
splender
NitrousUK
splender
Quorn is mechanically recovered mycoprotein that's heavily processed that has big carbon footprint in processing compared to other natural protein sources especially vegetable proteins. I would just eat naturally grown beans, pulses and grains with natural flavorings and seasoning.
"Processed" - verb -
* Perform a series of mechanical or chemical operations on (something) in order to change or preserve it.
* A word used to describe food by people who have read a blog and think they understand nutrition.
Care to provide any citation for the carbon footprint claim? As that's a new piece of FUD I haven't encountered yet.
And its carbon footprint is detailed in the company's own report http://www.quorn.co.uk/~/media/quorn/downloads/sustainabilityreport.ashx
That says 90% less carbon footprint than meat...the product this is trying to replace, and the one you seem to be comparing by saying "especially vegetable proteins", implying meat sources. How is that by any stretch a "big" carbon footprint?
Last time I checked, 10% was smaller than 100%.
Does not make any bit of sense, but then FUD never does.
Well, just an hour ago, you did not even know about this carbon footprint and poo poo'ed this topic and dismissed it and now , having put this under your nose, you are taking the mickey on the word "big". If it wasn't big they wouldn't be making effort would they?!
#14
FIGHT! FIGHT! FIGHT!FIGHT!FIGHT!!!
#15
shifty18
Carbonize
I don't get why they try to pretend it's meat? Also pretty sure calling them Chicken Fillets is false advertising.
clearly says meat free...


Yes meat free chicken. Doesn't make sense. It's either chicken (meat) or it's not. Don't try to dress it up as something it's not.
#16
splender
NitrousUK
splender
NitrousUK
splender
Quorn is mechanically recovered mycoprotein that's heavily processed that has big carbon footprint in processing compared to other natural protein sources especially vegetable proteins. I would just eat naturally grown beans, pulses and grains with natural flavorings and seasoning.
"Processed" - verb -
* Perform a series of mechanical or chemical operations on (something) in order to change or preserve it.
* A word used to describe food by people who have read a blog and think they understand nutrition.
Care to provide any citation for the carbon footprint claim? As that's a new piece of FUD I haven't encountered yet.
And its carbon footprint is detailed in the company's own report http://www.quorn.co.uk/~/media/quorn/downloads/sustainabilityreport.ashx
That says 90% less carbon footprint than meat...the product this is trying to replace, and the one you seem to be comparing by saying "especially vegetable proteins", implying meat sources. How is that by any stretch a "big" carbon footprint?
Last time I checked, 10% was smaller than 100%.
Does not make any bit of sense, but then FUD never does.
Well, just an hour ago, you did not even know about this carbon footprint and poo poo'ed this topic and dismissed it and now , having put this under your nose, you are taking the mickey on the word "big". If it wasn't big they wouldn't be making effort would they?!
What makes you think I didn't know about it's carbon footprint? Did you think I thought their factory runs on pixie magic? The only thing ever in dispute is your totally nonsensical use of the word "big", for something which is 10x smaller than the closest equivalent.

"If it wasn't big they wouldn't be making effort would they?!" Making effort....for what!? Try making your sentences comprehensible.
1 Like #17
Carbonize
shifty18
Carbonize
I don't get why they try to pretend it's meat? Also pretty sure calling them Chicken Fillets is false advertising.
clearly says meat free...

Yes meat free chicken. Doesn't make sense. It's either chicken (meat) or it's not. Don't try to dress it up as something it's not.
It's very helpful for the consumer to know if something is approximating the taste, texture, and look of something else.
If someone wanted to use meat to approximate the shape, texture, and taste of a carrot and call it a "meat carrot", I'm sure that would be useful to some people. I can read the word "meat" in there and know pretty quickly what the deal is.
Why does this make you angry? Did someone trademark "chicken"?
#18
NitrousUK
Carbonize
shifty18
Carbonize
I don't get why they try to pretend it's meat? Also pretty sure calling them Chicken Fillets is false advertising.
clearly says meat free...

Yes meat free chicken. Doesn't make sense. It's either chicken (meat) or it's not. Don't try to dress it up as something it's not.
It's very helpful for the consumer to know if something is approximating the taste, texture, and look of something else.
If someone wanted to use meat to approximate the shape, texture, and taste of a carrot and call it a "meat carrot", I'm sure that would be useful to some people. I can read the word "meat" in there and know pretty quickly what the deal is.
Why does this make you angry? Did someone trademark "chicken"?


It annoys me for the same reason a lot of vegetarian meals annoy me. If you're a vegetarian or just after something healthier why not just enjoy it for what it is rather than trying to make it like meat. If you want meat flavour and texture then just eat meat.
2 Likes #19
Carbonize
NitrousUK
Carbonize
shifty18
Carbonize
I don't get why they try to pretend it's meat? Also pretty sure calling them Chicken Fillets is false advertising.
clearly says meat free...
Yes meat free chicken. Doesn't make sense. It's either chicken (meat) or it's not. Don't try to dress it up as something it's not.
It's very helpful for the consumer to know if something is approximating the taste, texture, and look of something else.
If someone wanted to use meat to approximate the shape, texture, and taste of a carrot and call it a "meat carrot", I'm sure that would be useful to some people. I can read the word "meat" in there and know pretty quickly what the deal is.
Why does this make you angry? Did someone trademark "chicken"?
It annoys me for the same reason a lot of vegetarian meals annoy me. If you're a vegetarian or just after something healthier why not just enjoy it for what it is rather than trying to make it like meat. If you want meat flavour and texture then just eat meat.
This is a very common question. With surprisingly simple answers.
1. It helps people transition gradually from a meat diet
2. They can reuse recipes for meat
3. They can eat it without drawing attention to themselves (and getting the usual questions)
4. They may like the taste/texture of meat, just not the other aspects (health impact, environmental impact, ethics, etc)

Personally I don't care if it's like meat, being a practical shape and texture is more important, but I don't think of it as chicken anymore. Just a chunk of protein. Some of the Quorn products are too similar to meat (cocktail sausages for example) for me to find appetising.
#20
NitrousUK
splender
NitrousUK
splender
NitrousUK
splender
Quorn is mechanically recovered mycoprotein that's heavily processed that has big carbon footprint in processing compared to other natural protein sources especially vegetable proteins. I would just eat naturally grown beans, pulses and grains with natural flavorings and seasoning.
"Processed" - verb -
* Perform a series of mechanical or chemical operations on (something) in order to change or preserve it.
* A word used to describe food by people who have read a blog and think they understand nutrition.
Care to provide any citation for the carbon footprint claim? As that's a new piece of FUD I haven't encountered yet.
And its carbon footprint is detailed in the company's own report http://www.quorn.co.uk/~/media/quorn/downloads/sustainabilityreport.ashx
That says 90% less carbon footprint than meat...the product this is trying to replace, and the one you seem to be comparing by saying "especially vegetable proteins", implying meat sources. How is that by any stretch a "big" carbon footprint?
Last time I checked, 10% was smaller than 100%.
Does not make any bit of sense, but then FUD never does.
Well, just an hour ago, you did not even know about this carbon footprint and poo poo'ed this topic and dismissed it and now , having put this under your nose, you are taking the mickey on the word "big". If it wasn't big they wouldn't be making effort would they?!
What makes you think I didn't know about it's carbon footprint? Did you think I thought their factory runs on pixie magic? The only thing ever in dispute is your totally nonsensical use of the word "big", for something which is 10x smaller than the closest equivalent.
"If it wasn't big they wouldn't be making effort would they?!" Making effort....for what!? Try making your sentences comprehensible.
You are a sucker to public relations, that Quorn brochure compared Quorn with only beef, so it is 10% compared with beef, just because I placed this one information bulletin under your nose at your convenience, I wasreferring "big" when compared to a large range of meal products that people typically eat as a meal. I am not saying you don't eat it because it is "Big", so that you liked to pick a fight with me for using the word "big", it is just another piece of consumer information. I eat it as a meat subsitute rarely because, as I said, many eat beans, pulses and grains plus sea caught fish as they are low in carbon footprint (one factor out of many factors in a consumer purchase) and I don't like stuff that is heavily processed (to make it look and taste like meat). I repeat you and others can eat as much as you like and there is no need to pick a fight about a word or two.
1 Like #21
splender
NitrousUK
splender
NitrousUK
splender
NitrousUK
splender
Quorn is mechanically recovered mycoprotein that's heavily processed that has big carbon footprint in processing compared to other natural protein sources especially vegetable proteins. I would just eat naturally grown beans, pulses and grains with natural flavorings and seasoning.
"Processed" - verb -
* Perform a series of mechanical or chemical operations on (something) in order to change or preserve it.
* A word used to describe food by people who have read a blog and think they understand nutrition.
Care to provide any citation for the carbon footprint claim? As that's a new piece of FUD I haven't encountered yet.
And its carbon footprint is detailed in the company's own report http://www.quorn.co.uk/~/media/quorn/downloads/sustainabilityreport.ashx
That says 90% less carbon footprint than meat...the product this is trying to replace, and the one you seem to be comparing by saying "especially vegetable proteins", implying meat sources. How is that by any stretch a "big" carbon footprint?
Last time I checked, 10% was smaller than 100%.
Does not make any bit of sense, but then FUD never does.
Well, just an hour ago, you did not even know about this carbon footprint and poo poo'ed this topic and dismissed it and now , having put this under your nose, you are taking the mickey on the word "big". If it wasn't big they wouldn't be making effort would they?!
What makes you think I didn't know about it's carbon footprint? Did you think I thought their factory runs on pixie magic? The only thing ever in dispute is your totally nonsensical use of the word "big", for something which is 10x smaller than the closest equivalent.
"If it wasn't big they wouldn't be making effort would they?!" Making effort....for what!? Try making your sentences comprehensible.
You are a sucker to public relations, that Quorn brochure compared Quorn with only beef, so it is 10% compared with beef, just because I placed this one information bulletin under your nose at your convenience, I wasreferring "big" when compared to a large range of meal products that people typically eat as a meal. I am not saying you don't eat it because it is "Big", so that you liked to pick a fight with me for using the word "big", it is just another piece of consumer information. I eat it as a meat subsitute rarely because, as I said, many eat beans, pulses and grains plus sea caught fish as they are low in carbon footprint (one factor out of many factors in a consumer purchase) and I don't like stuff that is heavily processed (to make it look and taste like meat). I repeat you and others can eat as much as you like and there is no need to pick a fight about a word or two.
The reason people, like me, pick a fight with people like you is because you come in and spread misinformation. You make the world slightly more ignorant and do everyone a disservice. And given the fact that Google is there to find any answer in seconds, there's no excuse for it. Ignorance is a choice in this day and age.

Regarding carbon footprint claim, you can easily find info to show Quorn is 1.5x less than chicken. So again, not "big", opposite, small infact.

Regarding eating beans and pulses, this shows you don't know about protein amino acid profiles. Not all proteins are the same, so they are not a direct substitute.

Regarding "heavily processed", that's a made-up meaningless word. It's for people to use who don't understand the specifics of why certain foods are bad for you. Foods like ready meals and fast food, commonly referred to as "processed", are bad for you for specific reasons, such as cooking oil used, cooking methods, preservatives, and various additives. Those do not apply to Quorn. None of the "processes" that Quorn undergoes has any impact on health, and are thus not worth mentioning.

Edited By: NitrousUK on Nov 04, 2016 09:49: layout
#22
amazonboy
"Free from gluten" "contains eggs and gluten":|

Two different products Quorn Meat Free Fillets has NO GLUTEN the other Quorn Meat Free Pieces has GLUTEN

It's a shame you misread the post an easy thing to do. Next time I'll post separately to advoid the confusion.

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Top of Page
Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!