Sainsburys - Nikon Coolpix L320 16 Megapixel 26x Zoom Black Digital Camera £74.99 - HotUKDeals
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Sainsburys - Nikon Coolpix L320 16 Megapixel 26x Zoom Black Digital Camera £74.99

£74.99 @ Sainsbury's
I've been watching this one come down in price. It was previously posted at £99 on here. When I happened to check it last week, it was down to £89. I checked again this morning and it's £74.99. … Read More
davidfinn1967 Avatar
3y, 3m agoFound 3 years, 3 months ago
I've been watching this one come down in price. It was previously posted at £99 on here. When I happened to check it last week, it was down to £89.

I checked again this morning and it's £74.99.

Seems a good price for what you're getting.

http://www.sainsburys.co.uk/sol/shop/technology/cameras_and_camcorders/125783192_nikon-coolpix-l320-16-megapixel-26x-zoom-black-digital-camera.html?hnav=4294966716
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Comments/page:
#1
Nice camera but why don't they put a viewfinder on it?

Holding the thing out in front of me and hoping that the sun isn't shining on the screen is too much like hard work.

Maybe the market is teenage girls who spend the whole day with a mobile phone in front of them!
banned 1 Like #2
allenkj
Nice camera but why don't they put a viewfinder on it?

Holding the thing out in front of me and hoping that the sun isn't shining on the screen is too much like hard work.

Maybe the market is teenage girls who spend the whole day with a mobile phone in front of them!
If the market is for teenage girls, then this would be pink lol.

Most cameras do not have view finders. As these cameras are mirrorless these will require an electronic viewfinder, quite pricey.
#3
what batteries does it take/built in etc?
#4
leeparsons
what batteries does it take/built in etc?
AA
#5
allenkj
Nice camera but why don't they put a viewfinder on it?

Holding the thing out in front of me and hoping that the sun isn't shining on the screen is too much like hard work.

Maybe the market is teenage girls who spend the whole day with a mobile phone in front of them!

It's aimed at people used to a compact camera or camera-phone who aren't used to a viewfinder & it keeps costs down
#6
I'm deterred by small CCD sensor.

I'd look for a refurb/2nd user CMOS Finepix EXR if I was justifying the step up from a point-click.

That said, I do think bridge units have a lot to offer, I'd venture so far as saying that the larger glass admits more light which is focused on the smaller (than DSLR) sensor. This should translate into more light sensitivity than would be otherwise suggested by the ratio of sensor areas or crop factors eg 1.5:5.6 for APS-C:Point-Click, or 1.5:5 for APS-C:FinePix EXR.

I've no idea how this math translates into shutter speed requirements or noise reduction, but I'm tempted to say these are proportional to the area of the sensor, or crop factor. I could go on but I'd be guessing and boring.

Edited By: zaphodbb on Mar 30, 2014 23:26
#7
zaphodbb


That said, I do think bridge units have a lot to offer, I'd venture so far as saying that the larger glass admits more light which is focused on the smaller (than DSLR) sensor. This should translate into more light sensitivity than would be otherwise suggested by the ratio of sensor areas or crop factors eg 1.5:5.6 for APS-C:Point-Click, or 1.5:5 for APS-C:FinePix EXR.

That would be the aperture, which is a max of f3.1 on this camera. Not too shabby as it's faster than a kit lens with a dslr.
#8
I have one not the best off cameras good for point and shoot.

The view finder is a big let down.
#9
dreamager
zaphodbb


That said, I do think bridge units have a lot to offer, I'd venture so far as saying that the larger glass admits more light which is focused on the smaller (than DSLR) sensor. This should translate into more light sensitivity than would be otherwise suggested by the ratio of sensor areas or crop factors eg 1.5:5.6 for APS-C:Point-Click, or 1.5:5 for APS-C:FinePix EXR.

That would be the aperture, which is a max of f3.1 on this camera. Not too shabby as it's faster than a kit lens with a dslr.

you cant compare apertures across camera types like that
in the real world, the lens is much slower than a kit dslr as its letting less light overall into a smaller hole
only useful really for comparing to the same class
#10
brilly
dreamager
zaphodbb


That said, I do think bridge units have a lot to offer, I'd venture so far as saying that the larger glass admits more light which is focused on the smaller (than DSLR) sensor. This should translate into more light sensitivity than would be otherwise suggested by the ratio of sensor areas or crop factors eg 1.5:5.6 for APS-C:Point-Click, or 1.5:5 for APS-C:FinePix EXR.
That would be the aperture, which is a max of f3.1 on this camera. Not too shabby as it's faster than a kit lens with a dslr.
you cant compare apertures across camera types like that
in the real world, the lens is much slower than a kit dslr as its letting less light overall into a smaller hole
only useful really for comparing to the same class
The aperture would be a very useful comparison across classes I would have thought? It is a ratio of the entrance pupil to the focal length, and given that focal lengths and entrance pupils adjust accordingly to the size of the sensor as different optics are needed per type of camera, the amount of light hitting the sensor would be comparable. The light transmission efficiency of these lenses (T stop) may be more or less apparent on these compared to dslrs but that is more a optical quality issue.
As far as I understand it, aperture is aperture regardless of the dimensional specifics, the problem would be if the glass was too small for the image circle to cover the sensor, in which case it is just not suitable for that camera. It is however letting in the same amount of light per area for equivalent aperture.
Either that or I'm completely misunderstanding things ;)
#11
dreamager
brilly
dreamager
zaphodbb


That said, I do think bridge units have a lot to offer, I'd venture so far as saying that the larger glass admits more light which is focused on the smaller (than DSLR) sensor. This should translate into more light sensitivity than would be otherwise suggested by the ratio of sensor areas or crop factors eg 1.5:5.6 for APS-C:Point-Click, or 1.5:5 for APS-C:FinePix EXR.

That would be the aperture, which is a max of f3.1 on this camera. Not too shabby as it's faster than a kit lens with a dslr.

you cant compare apertures across camera types like that
in the real world, the lens is much slower than a kit dslr as its letting less light overall into a smaller hole
only useful really for comparing to the same class

The aperture would be a very useful comparison across classes I would have thought? It is a ratio of the entrance pupil to the focal length, and given that focal lengths and entrance pupils adjust accordingly to the size of the sensor as different optics are needed per type of camera, the amount of light hitting the sensor would be comparable. The light transmission efficiency of these lenses (T stop) may be more or less apparent on these compared to dslrs but that is more a optical quality issue.
As far as I understand it, aperture is aperture regardless of the dimensional specifics, the problem would be if the glass was too small for the image circle to cover the sensor, in which case it is just not suitable for that camera. It is however letting in the same amount of light per area for equivalent aperture.
Either that or I'm completely misunderstanding things ;)

dont think you are misunderstanding it - yes aperture is aperture but its just a ratio which i think is meaningless on its own
what you are saying is right but am not sure its actually relevant leading to comparisons via effective aperture

the focal lengths on these are alot smaller so the actual hole itself being opened is smaller.
its not funneling the light into the hole, it just gets a cross-section of the light
so surely the larger sensor with its larger 'hole' is collecting more light making it more sensitive

but again, real world, even if it was properly equivalent the dslr could just bump iso whereas this couldn't.
so yes its fast but its artificial, or maybe its artificial the dslr can be 'fast' via the sensor.
1 Like #12
I traded in £50 of Nectar points today and bought this for £25 just in time for my holiday. I am a happy bunny. Thank you x
#13
Many thanks OP.
This sounds very good!
1 Like #14
perribrook
I traded in £50 of Nectar points today and bought this for £25 just in time for my holiday. I am a happy bunny. Thank you x

Did the same thing, many thanks OP!
#15
Bought with £10.00 off with nectar points and voted hot. Many thanks op. I've been poring over bridge cameras for weeks and this is a steal at this price despite it's limitations. They're being sold at 100-130 ish still on ebay and even used are not much less than this. Great deal. Many thanks.
#16
Now can anybody suggest a good deal on an SD card to go with it? :)
#17
dreamager
zaphodbb


That said, I do think bridge units have a lot to offer, I'd venture so far as saying that the larger glass admits more light which is focused on the smaller (than DSLR) sensor. This should translate into more light sensitivity than would be otherwise suggested by the ratio of sensor areas or crop factors eg 1.5:5.6 for APS-C:Point-Click, or 1.5:5 for APS-C:FinePix EXR.
That would be the aperture, which is a max of f3.1 on this camera. Not too shabby as it's faster than a kit lens with a dslr.

the aperture is just that, an aperture. but the lens is cylindrical with varying aperture, I think quoted rating is like the venturi in a carburetor. with bridges the larger front may, yes, may, help collect more light into the smaller aperture.
1 Like #18
better to pay a bit more and get a Lumix G2 2nd hand on ebay has 4/3rds size sensor, decent lens, proper viewfinder, articulationg touchscreen and takes far better pictures that that piece of tosh.... bought mine for £90 last week, and its a pleasure to use...
#19
zaphodbb
I'm deterred by small CCD sensor.

I'd look for a refurb/2nd user CMOS Finepix EXR if I was justifying the step up from a point-click.

That said, I do think bridge units have a lot to offer, I'd venture so far as saying that the larger glass admits more light which is focused on the smaller (than DSLR) sensor. This should translate into more light sensitivity than would be otherwise suggested by the ratio of sensor areas or crop factors eg 1.5:5.6 for APS-C:Point-Click, or 1.5:5 for APS-C:FinePix EXR.

the fuji EXR has a five crop sensor, no where near a aps-c sensor its tiny, i have one... it takes brilliant pictures, for a compact camera has loads of auto scene modes manual, and is great for auto exposure bracketting (HDR) as it fires off three pictures at the same time, i would highly recommend the Fuji F660 exr over the nikon listed on here...i have tried that nikon, and its really plasticky and makes an aweful noise when zooming

I've no idea how this math translates into shutter speed requirements or noise reduction, but I'm tempted to say these are proportional to the area of the sensor, or crop factor. I could go on but I'd be guessing and boring.
#20
http://cvp.com/images/uploaded/sensor_table.gif
#21
Thanks. Ordered.

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