We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Close

Samsung 32" LED TV £279.00 - John Lewis - 5 year guarantee - free delivery

gchildgchild

The Samsung UE32D4003B LED TV hands you access to a wealth of entertainment courtesy of built-in Freeview and thanks to two HDMI ports you’ll be able to have your games console and Blu-ray player connected simultaneously.
There are two HDMI connections which will allow you to connect to HD sources such as blu-ray players, consoles, set-top boxes or camcorders. An 8-day electronic programme guide will also ensure you will always find something great to watch.

Sound is delivered via two 10 watt speakers and features Dolby Digital +SRS theatre sound.

TIP: Get the Best Deals In Your Inbox

or
825° Hot Cold

All Comments (85)

Jump to unread Post a Comment
1
    biggysmalls
    unbeatable price with the 5 yr warranty.
    Orcinus_orca
    On mode power consumption 37 watts - very low, will save some £ in electricity
    tommytbone1
    HD Ready so not for me, but great price with warranty
    gchild
    £20 cheaper than argos - was on my way down there until i saw this!
    ianc1990
    Only HD ready and been through my fair share of TV's and Samsung rank very very low on my list!
    gchild
    ianc1990
    Only HD ready and been through my fair share of TV's and Samsung rank very very low on my list!


    Whats an alternative at this price?
    dooper
    Review...
    http://www.which.co.uk/technology/tv-and-dvd/reviews/led--lcd-and-plasma-tv/samsung-ue32d4000/review/

    Score 57%

    Pros: Decent picture quality for this price point, low energy use, wallet-friendly price

    Cons: Harsh audio, widescreen switching glitch on HDMI, lacks a couple of sockets (Scart and dedicated analogue audio out), usability niggles, Freeview tuner only

    The above review is of the D4000. On the basis that D4000 & D4003 share the same panel, processor & firmware, the review should be relevant.

    Edited By: dooper on Feb 19, 2012 11:01
    Babsy Baby
    Thanks. Looked at the deal, and went for the Toshiba 32" for the same price. 5 year guarantee is great. Heat added.
    Babsy Baby
    gchild
    £20 cheaper than argos - was on my way down there until i saw this!



    Was argos giving a 5yr warranty.
    MiiCK
    To be honest, think anybody buying a tv from today onwards should buy 1080p, why buy old technology? Good deal if your not needing the crisp picture but don't see the point in buying tech that's going to look like 240p soon! :p
    iAmLegendFam
    Cold, 720p, should be 1080p for this price, plus new models soon.
    Drake111
    You can get full HD ones at that price and size :/
    Nellster
    i can't tell the dif between 720 and 1080 on my 32".. i don't believe many would pass the pepsi challenge either unless you are 1ft away from tv
    wardy01
    Good TV for a bedroom?
    I feed all my TV's with the RF2 from Sky, so no issues with it being HD Ready.
    forest2002
    I can see a "is 1080p needed on a 32 inch screen" debate coming.

    On a serious note most of the "cons" from Which wouldn't be issues if you were using it with an av receiver and external speakers (something I consider a must with any flat screen).

    I've had the ue32c5100 for quite some time, I paid £350 for it, if the picture quality is anything like as good and with a 5 year warranty from John Lewis you can't be going far wrong for that kind of money.

    Edited By: forest2002 on Feb 19, 2012 14:33: .
    dooper
    There is a common misconception that a 'Full HD' (1080p) TV will automatically offer better picture quality than an 'HD Ready' (720p / 768p) TV.

    Picture quality depends on Panel & Processor & Video Processing Firmware specification. A good Panel matched to a poor Processor will result in poor picture quality. A poor Panel matched to a good Processor will result in poor picture quality.

    A good 720p or 768p Panel matched to a good Processor can outperform a poor 1080p Panel matched to a poor Processor. Do not associate 1080p specification with high performance. It is not guaranteed, e.g.

    Hannspree SV32LMNB. 1080p. Digitalversus Verdict 2/5

    Luxor LUX-40-914-TVB. 1080p. Which? Score 39%

    M&S 32100 LED. 1080p. Which? Score 43%

    John Lewis JL23LED. 1080p. Which? Score 45%

    LG 32LK330. 768p. Which? Score 60%
    gchild
    As usual this is getting a little over cooked.

    If there is a better 32" led tv to be had at this price, then post it! You can always get better, but I bet it costs more!
    blue_eyes777
    what would PC text look like running on this please?
    any ideas?
    kodbel
    I bought it in Jan at the same price with a price match. IMHO, it's a good tv (video quality wise), sound quality should have been better. Disappointing input options - no dvi, only 1 hdmi. USB can only playback audio and photos. Had to change model number through service menu to enable video playback.
    Mentos
    IMO the 5 year JL warranty makes it a reasonably good deal. However, if the equivalent models from the previous generation are anything to go by, this will not be an unusually low price for this TV.
    credington
    no freeview HD=fail
    c.grex
    credington
    no freeview HD=fail


    No 3D= fail

    Not 60"=fail

    Etc....

    The tv is what it is. Is it hot or cold!?
    chubuking
    king_iang
    alternative32" 1080p samsung 279.99

    Edited By: king_iang on Feb 19, 2012 17:42
    shareef


    Fair enough it may be a better specced tv but it is 80 quid more and doesn't come with a 5 year warranty worth around 100 to 200 bucks, so can't really compare the two.
    dealfeal
    dooper
    There is a common misconception that a 'Full HD' (1080p) TV will automatically offer better picture quality than an 'HD Ready' (720p / 768p) TV.

    Picture quality depends on Panel & Processor & Video Processing Firmware specification. A good Panel matched to a poor Processor will result in poor picture quality. A poor Panel matched to a good Processor will result in poor picture quality.

    A good 720p or 768p Panel matched to a good Processor can outperform a poor 1080p Panel matched to a poor Processor. Do not associate 1080p specification with high performance. It is not guaranteed, e.g.

    Hannspree SV32LMNB. 1080p. Digitalversus Verdict 2/5

    Luxor LUX-40-914-TVB. 1080p. Which? Score 39%

    M&S 32100 LED. 1080p. Which? Score 43%

    John Lewis JL23LED. 1080p. Which? Score 45%

    LG 32LK330. 768p. Which? Score 60%


    Thanks for the great reviews as always...
    hank2spoons
    samsung along with pannys are the dogs dangleys. I believe 1080p is only usefull on a broadcasting level if u have gd channels. Plus u can upscale to 1080i for gaming. So if u dont have any hd channels u will be watching tv on 720p. I would say surely better the hz i.e. 100hz and above the better.
    hank2spoons
    *hd channels
    Mish_Mash
    iAmLegendFam
    plus new models soon.

    Aren't there always?
    DarrylJohn
    My heart dropped abit there till I realised it wasnt the same TV as I paid £329 for without the 5 years warranty.

    UE32D5000
    Mentos
    shareef


    Fair enough it may be a better specced tv but it is 80 quid more and doesn't come with a 5 year warranty worth around 100 to 200 bucks, so can't really compare the two.


    How can a 5 year warranty on a £279 product be worth £100 to £200?
    Common Sense
    5 year warranty, according to Richer Sounds costs 10% of purchase price = £27.90.

    EU law... goods should last a reasonable duration. 2 years minium and arguably 5 years+.
    You have 6 years to make a claim. After 2 years it is on your head to show a common fault.
    There are many reviews and user groups to help.

    Brother repaired my printer after 5 years after I mentioned the regulation. For less than £300, few companies are willing to waste a day in the small claims court to defend a claim. It costs them more to represent themselves and they cannot reclaim costs. For low cost items, consumers are king!

    Edited By: Common Sense on Feb 19, 2012 19:49
    shareef
    Common Sense
    5 year warranty, according to Richer Sounds costs 10% of purchase price = £27.90.

    EU law... goods should last a reasonable duration. 2 years minium and arguably 5 years+.
    You have 6 years to make a claim. After 2 years it is on your head to show a common fault.
    There are many reviews and user groups to help.

    Brother repaired my printer after 5 years after I mentioned the regulation. For less than £300, few companies are willing to waste a day in the small claims court to defend a claim. It costs them more to represent themselves and they cannot reclaim costs. For low cost items, consumers are king!


    And a 5 year warranty at comet/currys costs a hell of a lot more, I was talking average.

    Secondly I agree about the law but this is no guarantee + it's a hassle to some people who WANT a warranty with it, this is about a deal with a warranty, not the ethics/practice of warrantys
    Andysnowboarder
    People on here are a bit picky, it's only a tv, and it's a good price. No need to rip everything to pieces. It's not an iphone but who cares? Hot!
    sweeney287
    Good price for a 32" with a 5 yr warranty.
    Infinite Element
    There was a HD Ready 32" for £189 at Tesco not so long ago.

    A 5-year guarantee would involve as much paperwork and legwork as getting your telly repaired by law as previously mentioned. I would personally avoid this, as this is effectively a budget telly at nearly £100 more than others.
    steve10574
    Can this be hacked to play video files (dont think it does out the box)
    JamieH
    You won't really notice the difference between 720p over 1080p on a 32" TV. On this basis I am voting H O T 8)
    Sawb
    hank2spoons
    samsung along with pannys are the dogs dangleys. I believe 1080p is only usefull on a broadcasting level if u have gd channels. Plus u can upscale to 1080i for gaming. So if u dont have any hd channels u will be watching tv on 720p. I would say surely better the hz i.e. 100hz and above the better.


    This tv will not display 1080i, it can accept a signal in that format and convert it to its native 720p panel. Im not sure what you mean you'll be watching tv on 720p, everything you watch on this tv will be 720p, better if its given native 720p material or the tv will upscale the signal itself and the 100hz thing is personal preference, it can cause as many problems as it fixes.
    ger_ryan22
    dooper
    There is a common misconception that a 'Full HD' (1080p) TV will automatically offer better picture quality than an 'HD Ready' (720p / 768p) TV.

    Picture quality depends on Panel & Processor & Video Processing Firmware specification. A good Panel matched to a poor Processor will result in poor picture quality. A poor Panel matched to a good Processor will result in poor picture quality.

    A good 720p or 768p Panel matched to a good Processor can outperform a poor 1080p Panel matched to a poor Processor. Do not associate 1080p specification with high performance. It is not guaranteed, e.g.

    Hannspree SV32LMNB. 1080p. Digitalversus Verdict 2/5

    Luxor LUX-40-914-TVB. 1080p. Which? Score 39%

    M&S 32100 LED. 1080p. Which? Score 43%

    John Lewis JL23LED. 1080p. Which? Score 45%

    LG 32LK330. 768p. Which? Score 60%


    I bought the last one you mentioned there (LG) from Richer Sounds on Thursday for the bedroom. I've had a 1080p Samsung in the living room for a few years now and honestly, I can't tell the difference in the quality of the HD picture and there's nothing wrong with my eyes. I think people get duped into paying an extra £50 - £70 on a TV just because it's 1080p. Save your money and get the 720p if you want and people won't be dissapointed. I got £10 off my LG when I rang Richer Sounds. Curry's are selling it for £234, RS for £249. At least I was able to pick it up straightaway and not have to worry about waiting on Curry's delivery times.
    Sawb
    JamieH
    You won't really notice the difference between 720p over 1080p on a 32" TV. On this basis I am voting H O T 8)


    Depends on usage, i have nothing against 720p panels. Ive got a 720p plasma. But if people had any intention on gaming on this or using it as a monitor etc then i would advise against buying it.
    Sawb
    Nellster
    i can't tell the dif between 720 and 1080 on my 32".. i don't believe many would pass the pepsi challenge either unless you are 1ft away from tv


    How can you compare 720p and 1080p on the same tv?????
    JamieH
    Sawb
    JamieH
    You won't really notice the difference between 720p over 1080p on a 32" TV. On this basis I am voting H O T 8)


    Depends on usage, i have nothing against 720p panels. Ive got a 720p plasma. But if people had any intention on gaming on this or using it as a monitor etc then i would advise against buying it.


    I agree if using as a monitor and sitting within 8 feet of the set as I have a 32" 720p in my bedroom as a monitor and I am looking at upgrading to 1080p. But saying that the downstairs TV is 32" 1080p and when watching blu-ray on either set from 8 foot away I can't tell the difference. Oh and they are both Sammys.
    kodbel
    steve10574
    Can this be hacked to play video files (dont think it does out the box)

    Yes
    Sykobabble
    The sound quality on Samsung is ****!
    hank2spoons
    Sawb
    hank2spoons
    samsung along with pannys are the dogs dangleys. I believe 1080p is only usefull on a broadcasting level if u have gd channels. Plus u can upscale to 1080i for gaming. So if u dont have any hd channels u will be watching tv on 720p. I would say surely better the hz i.e. 100hz and above the better.


    This tv will not display 1080i, it can accept a signal in that format and convert it to its native 720p panel. Im not sure what you mean you'll be watching tv on 720p, everything you watch on this tv will be 720p, better if its given native 720p material or the tv will upscale the signal itself and the 100hz thing is personal preference, it can cause as many problems as it fixes.

    I thought most new led/lcd could upscale to 1080i for gaming. so are u saying it cannot play the xbox360 at high def 1080i?? if not thats pants. my old sharp aquious upscales to 1080i no probs, as does my even older goodmans lcd
    zwortexx
    Its a amazing price better than tesco value ones
    cecanor
    I have one unopened/unsealed one (bought yesterday from John Lewis, luckily replacing another order). If anybody is interested, I can give it for 20£ cheaper. Just pm me.
    Sawb
    hank2spoons
    Sawb
    hank2spoons
    samsung along with pannys are the dogs dangleys. I believe 1080p is only usefull on a broadcasting level if u have gd channels. Plus u can upscale to 1080i for gaming. So if u dont have any hd channels u will be watching tv on 720p. I would say surely better the hz i.e. 100hz and above the better.


    This tv will not display 1080i, it can accept a signal in that format and convert it to its native 720p panel. Im not sure what you mean you'll be watching tv on 720p, everything you watch on this tv will be 720p, better if its given native 720p material or the tv will upscale the signal itself and the 100hz thing is personal preference, it can cause as many problems as it fixes.

    I thought most new led/lcd could upscale to 1080i for gaming. so are u saying it cannot play the xbox360 at high def 1080i?? if not thats pants. my old sharp aquious upscales to 1080i no probs, as does my even older goodmans lcd


    I think youll find your old lcd's do not display 1080i. As far as im aware no lcd screens display interlaced material and a 720p tv can not display more pixels than it physically has. Whenever these tv's speak about 1080i its simply about being able to accept a 1080i signal and convert it. I think its a marketing gimmick to confuse consumers into thinky its basically the same as a 1080p tv. You should not feed a 720p tv 1080i material if possible as it simply will create a worse picture as more picture processing is needed and more lag as a result. If you have an xbox you should set the picture to what matches the panel, a lot of lcd's screens are actually 1366x768, that is the settting you should have your xbox on (if thats what your tv actually is)
    Ghost567
    Great deal, Heat added! :)
    blizzard7
    Yes, newer TVs are out but that's why it's cheap!

    Rough guide to viewing distances http://www.hdtvtest.co.uk/Article/How-Far-Should-I-Sit.php

    For a 32" TV, pretty much no-one will be able to tell the difference between 1080p and 720p from 2 metres away.
    scoob65
    Sawb
    Nellster
    i can't tell the dif between 720 and 1080 on my 32".. i don't believe many would pass the pepsi challenge either unless you are 1ft away from tv


    How can you compare 720p and 1080p on the same tv?????



    By watching a blu-ray (1080p) and watching Sky HD 1080i which is more like 720p.
    Mentos
    shareef
    Common Sense
    5 year warranty, according to Richer Sounds costs 10% of purchase price = £27.90.

    EU law... goods should last a reasonable duration. 2 years minium and arguably 5 years+.
    You have 6 years to make a claim. After 2 years it is on your head to show a common fault.
    There are many reviews and user groups to help.

    Brother repaired my printer after 5 years after I mentioned the regulation. For less than £300, few companies are willing to waste a day in the small claims court to defend a claim. It costs them more to represent themselves and they cannot reclaim costs. For low cost items, consumers are king!


    And a 5 year warranty at comet/currys costs a hell of a lot more, I was talking average.


    The average of £27.99 and Comets/Currys warranty price on a set costing £279 is £100 - £200?

    Why would anyone in their right mind pay £100-£200 to indemnify themselves against a fault in a product costing £279. Particularly when you are covered by the manufacturers warranty for the first year.

    Even if you could find such a ridiculously priced extended warranty, doesn't make a 5 year warranty "worth" between 35% - 70% of the cost of the product. There's a difference between what something is worth and the highest price you can find for it.
    Mentos
    scoob65
    Sawb
    Nellster
    i can't tell the dif between 720 and 1080 on my 32".. i don't believe many would pass the pepsi challenge either unless you are 1ft away from tv


    How can you compare 720p and 1080p on the same tv?????





    By watching a blu-ray (1080p) and watching Sky HD 1080i which is more like 720p.


    1080i is not more like 720p, its unfortunately a common misconception stated on this site. In fact for some content (movies which are natively 24fps) there's no difference between broadcast 1080p/50 and 1080i/50 (Assuming your set can de-interlace correctly. And possibly the frame rate conversion method used by your set and the broadcaster). Even for material natively shot at 1080p/50/60, broadcasting at 1080i/50 provides significantly more detail then 720p/50 and requires no scaling if your set is 1080p.

    More over, I think you misunderstood the question the other poster was posing. An LCD/Plasma panels native resolution is fixed. You cannot therefore compare the merits of a 720p panel over a 1080p panel, by simply feeding it source material at different resolutions. You will see an image at the panels native resolution, wether that be scaled or not.

    Edited By: Mentos on Feb 20, 2012 01:48
    darrenanderson1984
    blue_eyes777
    what would PC text look like running on this please?
    any ideas?


    It'll be fine. I have my spare pc on a 720 tv and it is adequate. I prefer a 1080 tv for using as a monitor so that more of a webpage is displayed and you can change the resolution to suit you
    smellyonion
    darrenanderson1984
    blue_eyes777
    what would PC text look like running on this please?
    any ideas?


    It'll be fine. I have my spare pc on a 720 tv and it is adequate. I prefer a 1080 tv for using as a monitor so that more of a webpage is displayed and you can change the resolution to suit you

    No way, you definately need 1080p if you intend on using it as a monitor on a 32". It looks far too pixilated as you sit so close. i use 1080p on my 32" and setting it at a smaller resolution looks terrible, I would want more than 1080p too. 720p is fine for up to 22".
    smellyonion
    Sawb
    JamieH
    You won't really notice the difference between 720p over 1080p on a 32" TV. On this basis I am voting H O T 8)


    Depends on usage, i have nothing against 720p panels. Ive got a 720p plasma. But if people had any intention on gaming on this or using it as a monitor etc then i would advise against buying it.

    It depends on screen size and viewing distance, thats it.
    Gaming on consoles is 720p so irrelevant. Monitor needs atleast 1080p for a 32" as you sit close.
    Overal if you going to use this tv for anything other than a monitor, it will be fine.
    How can you compare 720p and 1080p on the same tv?????

    Simply by changing the output resolution on your hd device like a bluray player or using something which outputs in 720p.

    Edited By: smellyonion on Feb 20, 2012 05:05
    retrend
    blizzard7
    Yes, newer TVs are out but that's why it's cheap!

    Rough guide to viewing distances http://www.hdtvtest.co.uk/Article/How-Far-Should-I-Sit.php

    For a 32" TV, pretty much no-one will be able to tell the difference between 1080p and 720p from 2 metres away.


    marketing **** used to sell 720 tvs.
    smellyonion
    retrend
    blizzard7
    Yes, newer TVs are out but that's why it's cheap!

    Rough guide to viewing distances http://www.hdtvtest.co.uk/Article/How-Far-Should-I-Sit.php

    For a 32" TV, pretty much no-one will be able to tell the difference between 1080p and 720p from 2 metres away.


    marketing **** used to sell 720 tvs.

    the irony of your statement is that the true marketing bs about the superiority of 1080p on small displays was absorbed by you.
    Viewing distance and screensize is science, at greater distances, the human eye is incapable of resolving details.
    Also who is marketing to who? A smal, independent website....what stupidity.
    The world being round must also be marketing, by your logic.
    crazyp
    Totally agree with the above. If you're using as a TV, at any kind of reasonable distance, you'd be hard pressed to tell 720p v 1080p (different as a monitor, of course)

    Edit: The hdtvtest link above does explain it quite well..

    Edited By: crazyp on Feb 20, 2012 08:02

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

I Approve
Your Comments On This Post
Comment Preview
Close

PRIVATE MESSAGE

Close
Sorry, you can’t currently send PMs. Once you’re a more active member of the forum, the PM service will be unlocked for you.
Welcome to HUKD!
Close
Join the Community