SAMSUNG UE32H5000 32" LED HD 1080p Freeview HD TV £199.99 with 5 year guarantee @ John Lewis - HotUKDeals
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SAMSUNG UE32H5000 32" LED HD 1080p Freeview HD TV £199.99 with 5 year guarantee @ John Lewis

£199.99 @ John Lewis
Samsung UE32H5000 LED HD 1080p TV, 32" with Freeview HD. Just bought one myself. - It's Full HD 1080p LED with a 100Hz motion rate. - FREE DELIVERY - 5 year guarantee - Screen resolution 1920 … Read More
iCrystalMethod Avatar
2y, 4m agoFound 2 years, 4 months ago
Samsung UE32H5000 LED HD 1080p TV, 32" with Freeview HD. Just bought one myself.

- It's Full HD 1080p LED with a 100Hz motion rate.
- FREE DELIVERY
- 5 year guarantee
- Screen resolution 1920 x 1080 pixels
- Freeview HD
- Energy rating A

Its not a smart TV but I have an xbox so not much point spending an extra £50

Obviously you can get a cheaper LED 1080p TV from a brand you've never heard of, but Samsung are one of the best brands for TV's :)
More From John Lewis:

Top Comments

(1)
5 Likes
AmazingJeans
JTS4815162342
Good deal, newer model tv aswell

Samsung are on Series 7 or 8 and this is Series 5, what do you mean newer model?

Don't get me wrong Samsung make some really decent TV's and I have a Series 5 myself, I just don't know what you mean by your comment.

Series number has nothing to do with the age of set release. Samsung always have a Series 5, 6, 7 and 8 etc. Granted the higher the number the better featured the set. Samsung TV Model identifying codes are generally as the example below..

UE32H5000

U = LED
E = Produced for Europe
32 = Screen Size in Inches
H = Model Year 2014
5000 = Series 5

All Comments

(45) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
Page:
#1
Tv is amazing. Bought one a couple of months back. Picture qaulity is top notch
#2
great tv heat
#3
Very good quality TV
#4
So tempted, but my last Samsung just stopped turning on after 3 years and I barely used it!
#5
Good deal, newer model tv aswell
#6
JTS4815162342
Good deal, newer model tv aswell

Samsung are on Series 7 or 8 and this is Series 5, what do you mean newer model?

Don't get me wrong Samsung make some really decent TV's and I have a Series 5 myself, I just don't know what you mean by your comment.
#7
I'm planning on trying to get a UE40H5500 tomorrow for £350 in Glasgow from John Lewis. Hope they're in stock as I can use bonds, etc too.

Regarding Samsung lasting, my 26/27 inch from 2002 is still going strong.
#8
http://www.richersounds.com/product/tv---all/samsung/ue40h5500/sams-ue40h5500 £349 and get FREE Samsung WAM250 what ever that is
1 Like #9
DexMorgan
So tempted, but my last Samsung just stopped turning on after 3 years and I barely used it!


Side issue but take the back off and check the capacitors, think they often blow on samsungs and you can re solder a new one on they cost a couple of quid.
#10
Got this TV myself. If you are going to notice things like motion blur get a more expensive set.

It's good but this is still a low budget 50hz TV despite the brand, and the recommended settings on
have all the fancy features set to off.
#11
http://www.richersounds.com/product/tv---all/samsung/ue40h5500/sams-ue40h5500 £349 and get FREE Samsung WAM250 what ever that is
2 Likes #12
AmazingJeans
JTS4815162342
Good deal, newer model tv aswell

Samsung are on Series 7 or 8 and this is Series 5, what do you mean newer model?

Don't get me wrong Samsung make some really decent TV's and I have a Series 5 myself, I just don't know what you mean by your comment.

I thought with Samsung models, the letter signified the model year, and the number showed how high up the range it is?
#13
http://www.richersounds.com/product/tv---all/samsung/ue40h5500/sams-ue40h5500 £349 and get FREE Samsung WAM250 what ever that is
#14
Richersounds £349 and get FREE Samsung WAM250 what ever that is
3 Likes #15
AmazingJeans
JTS4815162342
Good deal, newer model tv aswell

Samsung are on Series 7 or 8 and this is Series 5, what do you mean newer model?

Don't get me wrong Samsung make some really decent TV's and I have a Series 5 myself, I just don't know what you mean by your comment.

He means that it's an H model, which is 2014. The Series number refers to the level of specification, i.e. 4 is 720p, 5 is FHD, 6 has a faster refresh rate, and so on up to 9 which is 4K.
#16
bobobalde
DexMorgan
So tempted, but my last Samsung just stopped turning on after 3 years and I barely used it!

Side issue but take the back off and check the capacitors, think they often blow on samsungs and you can re solder a new one on they cost a couple of quid.

Don't suppose many people will know what a capacitor is or which ones to replace so I wouldn't recommend anyone takes this bad advice!


Edited By: chegz60 on Dec 26, 2014 21:00
5 Likes #17
AmazingJeans
JTS4815162342
Good deal, newer model tv aswell

Samsung are on Series 7 or 8 and this is Series 5, what do you mean newer model?

Don't get me wrong Samsung make some really decent TV's and I have a Series 5 myself, I just don't know what you mean by your comment.

Series number has nothing to do with the age of set release. Samsung always have a Series 5, 6, 7 and 8 etc. Granted the higher the number the better featured the set. Samsung TV Model identifying codes are generally as the example below..

UE32H5000

U = LED
E = Produced for Europe
32 = Screen Size in Inches
H = Model Year 2014
5000 = Series 5
#18
AmazingJeans
JTS4815162342
Good deal, newer model tv aswell

Samsung are on Series 7 or 8 and this is Series 5, what do you mean newer model?

Don't get me wrong Samsung make some really decent TV's and I have a Series 5 myself, I just don't know what you mean by your comment.
With Samsungs, the number (5-9) indicates how high up the product range a model is, and it's the letter which shows you how old it is (and if I'm not mistaken, H means it's the 2014 range)
Hot deal
1 Like #19
AmazingJeans
JTS4815162342
Good deal, newer model tv aswell

Samsung are on Series 7 or 8 and this is Series 5, what do you mean newer model?

Don't get me wrong Samsung make some really decent TV's and I have a Series 5 myself, I just don't know what you mean by your comment.

We have an expert on the board! :)

The letter, in this case 'H' represents the year. Your TV may be a UE32F5*** or older UE32D5*** etc.

The 4,5,6,7,8 etc. represents the 'series', a 4 series is usually just 720p, 5 series is 1080p entry model, with 6,7 and 8 series higher end models with more features, better quality
1 Like #20
AmazingJeans
JTS4815162342
Good deal, newer model tv aswell

Samsung are on Series 7 or 8 and this is Series 5, what do you mean newer model?

Don't get me wrong Samsung make some really decent TV's and I have a Series 5 myself, I just don't know what you mean by your comment.

I think me meant that its a 2014 model :)
1 Like #21
chrisgriffiths3958
Richersounds £349 and get FREE Samsung WAM250 what ever that is

Wireless Audio Multiroom Hub 250, it's to connect SAMSUNGS Sonus type wireless speakers

Edited By: firstie on Dec 26, 2014 21:06
#22
Normally £220 max since August
1 Like #23
£199 is a great price for a TV of this quality. Don't be tempted by bigger Blaupunkt and Polaroid TVs from the Supermarkets. This TV offers really good sound and picture - and with a 5 year warranty, you can't go wrong. :p
#24
Aww, all the people that missed out on the 40inch Samsung @Tesco for £200 :(
1 Like #25
This tv is the same price at richer sounds also with a five year warranty but in store collection only. If anyone lives nearby a richer sounds this maybe a slightly better deal as they may price match and sell it for 195.


Edited By: JamesTSR100 on Dec 26, 2014 21:35
#26
Comment
bobobalde
DexMorgan
So tempted, but my last Samsung just stopped turning on after 3 years and I barely used it!


Side issue but take the back off and check the capacitors, think they often blow on samsungs and you can re solder a new one on they cost a couple of quid.


For those who have no clue, which would include most of us, I had this same issue and it cost 60 quid for the board to be fixed....tv now going strong again so well worth it
#27
Dr Zoidberg
AmazingJeans
JTS4815162342
Good deal, newer model tv aswell

Samsung are on Series 7 or 8 and this is Series 5, what do you mean newer model?

Don't get me wrong Samsung make some really decent TV's and I have a Series 5 myself, I just don't know what you mean by your comment.

I thought with Samsung models, the letter signified the model year, and the number showed how high up the range it is?

That may very well be the case....I got one of these this year UE40H5500-BK for £330 from Co-op Electrical.

EDIT - As a few other people have mentioned about what the letters and numbers mean, I understand now, cheers.


Edited By: AmazingJeans on Dec 26, 2014 21:43
#28
How has this not gone 1000+? Incredible deal.
#29
Thanks, purchased, free collection from my local Waitrose.
#30
I have this TV got it from john lewis the other week for 209. It has a fantastic picture quality. Would recommended. Oh and the bezel is tiny.
2 Likes #31
hotmep
Got this TV myself. If you are going to notice things like motion blur get a more expensive set.

It's good but this is still a low budget 50hz TV despite the brand, and the recommended settings on
have all the fancy features set to off.

Unfortunately Hz rating can no longer be relied on to infer the refresh rate of a panel. Manufacturers generally use it to refer to the frame interpolation mechanism the set incorporates. Worse still it's not even consistent across a single manufacturers range, let alone between manufacturers :/

Motion blur is generally due to retina retention triggered by the sample and hold method LCDs use to display the source. It's not because the panel itself doesn't have a refresh rate fast enough as was the case in early displays. There is no blur on the image the set displays, it's the way our eyes work that causes us perceive blur.

Frame interpolation can help alleviate this but adds many other issues (soap opera effect and artefacts). Some modern LCDs use black frame interpolation to avoid retina retention, but since this is effectively mimicking pulse displays like Plasma/CRT this introduces the issues those technologies suffer from (reduces brightness, flicker, odd trailing, etc).

In short the issue is the low frame rate of the material not the sets these days. All methods to overcome this involve some sort of compromise, it's just a case of figuring out which is the most bearable for you (some are more susceptible to retina retention, others to flicker, others to the soap opera effect and some unfortunately to all of them).

Edited By: Mentos on Dec 26, 2014 23:47
1 Like #32
got one for my step son for xmas, for 200 it will take a lot of beating... with lovely before its turned on looking tv, and it works nice, sounds good... what more do you want in a TV?
#33
Comment
Mentos
hotmep
Got this TV myself. If you are going to notice things like motion blur get a more expensive set.

It's good but this is still a low budget 50hz TV despite the brand, and the recommended settings on
have all the fancy features set to off.

Unfortunately Hz rating can no longer be relied on to infer the refresh rate of a panel. Manufacturers generally use it to refer to the frame interpolation mechanism the set incorporates. Worse still it's not even consistent across a single manufacturers range, let alone between manufacturers :/

Motion blur is generally due to retina retention triggered by the sample and hold method LCDs use to display the source. It's not because the panel itself doesn't have a refresh rate fast enough as was the case in early displays. There is no blur on the image the set displays, it's the way our eyes work that causes us perceive blur.

Frame interpolation can help alleviate this but adds many other issues (soap opera effect and artefacts). Some modern LCDs use black frame interpolation to avoid retina retention, but since this is effectively mimicking pulse displays like Plasma/CRT this introduces the issues those technologies suffer from (reduces brightness, flicker, odd trailing, etc).

In short the issue is the low frame rate of the material not the sets these days. All methods to overcome this involve some sort of compromise, it's just a case of figuring out which is the most bearable for you (some are more susceptible to retina retention, others to flicker, others to the soap opera effect and some unfortunately to all of them).


So is this to not led? As you mentioned lcds cause "motion blur"? Good knowledge by the way.
#34
Yorkshire_Lad
Comment
Mentos
hotmep
Got this TV myself. If you are going to notice things like motion blur get a more expensive set.

It's good but this is still a low budget 50hz TV despite the brand, and the recommended settings on
have all the fancy features set to off.

Unfortunately Hz rating can no longer be relied on to infer the refresh rate of a panel. Manufacturers generally use it to refer to the frame interpolation mechanism the set incorporates. Worse still it's not even consistent across a single manufacturers range, let alone between manufacturers :/

Motion blur is generally due to retina retention triggered by the sample and hold method LCDs use to display the source. It's not because the panel itself doesn't have a refresh rate fast enough as was the case in early displays. There is no blur on the image the set displays, it's the way our eyes work that causes us perceive blur.

Frame interpolation can help alleviate this but adds many other issues (soap opera effect and artefacts). Some modern LCDs use black frame interpolation to avoid retina retention, but since this is effectively mimicking pulse displays like Plasma/CRT this introduces the issues those technologies suffer from (reduces brightness, flicker, odd trailing, etc).

In short the issue is the low frame rate of the material not the sets these days. All methods to overcome this involve some sort of compromise, it's just a case of figuring out which is the most bearable for you (some are more susceptible to retina retention, others to flicker, others to the soap opera effect and some unfortunately to all of them).

So is this to not led? As you mentioned lcds cause "motion blur"? Good knowledge by the way.

The panel is still LCD but the backlight is LED. Companies always label the TV's LED because they know lots of people will get suckered in to thinking it's using an OLED panel...
#35
chegz60
bobobalde
DexMorgan
So tempted, but my last Samsung just stopped turning on after 3 years and I barely used it!

Side issue but take the back off and check the capacitors, think they often blow on samsungs and you can re solder a new one on they cost a couple of quid.

Don't suppose many people will know what a capacitor is or which ones to replace so I wouldn't recommend anyone takes this bad advice!


You ok fella? Obviously my comment was meant for people with some basic knowledge. Even so, you could always google 'capacitor' and get a pretty good idea what they look like (or even search for samsung capacitor and its the first result). Also, to all intents and purposes the TV is broken, you can't do it any harm by unscrewing it and taking a look, believe me, any person with half a brain would notice which capacitor is blown - you can even google that yourself as well and get a good idea.

As i said, it was a side issue aimed specifically at that 1 person who said they had a Samsung that wouldn't turn on.
#36
Has anyone tried this as a computer monitor
#37
just been in currys... this tv is extremely light and wobbles like a jelly.
#38
Bought one after a wild goose chase to get ex-display models. Recommended settings anyone?
1 Like #39
mykaloen
just been in currys... this tv is extremely light and wobbles like a jelly.
Are you sure you weren't in the Jellyvision section?
#40
bobobalde
chegz60
bobobalde
DexMorgan
So tempted, but my last Samsung just stopped turning on after 3 years and I barely used it!

Side issue but take the back off and check the capacitors, think they often blow on samsungs and you can re solder a new one on they cost a couple of quid.

Don't suppose many people will know what a capacitor is or which ones to replace so I wouldn't recommend anyone takes this bad advice!


You ok fella? Obviously my comment was meant for people with some basic knowledge. Even so, you could always google 'capacitor' and get a pretty good idea what they look like (or even search for samsung capacitor and its the first result). Also, to all intents and purposes the TV is broken, you can't do it any harm by unscrewing it and taking a look, believe me, any person with half a brain would notice which capacitor is blown - you can even google that yourself as well and get a good idea.

As i said, it was a side issue aimed specifically at that 1 person who said they had a Samsung that wouldn't turn on.

As you say its worth a shot and given the size of Caps, they are one of the easier components for a Novice with a soldering iron to replace.

However, one should be careful opening TV's and other such electronics if they have no experience. Components and PSU's can sometimes hold charge for quite some time after the appliance has been unplugged. If you're a Novice whatever you do, don't unplug and immediately pop open the back of the TV and start poking around :/

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