Sanyo Eneloop AA 4 Pack Rechargeable Batteries 2000mAh £6.69 Delivered @ AMAZON.co.uk - HotUKDeals
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THESE BATTERIES ARE BY FAR THE BEST!! (if you don't believe check reviews)

ALSO THEY COME PRE-CHARGED!

eneloop is a combination of a rechargeable and a disposable battery the next evolutionary step for batteries into the 21st century. SANYO can ship the batteries to Amazon in an already charged state, without losing its power, because of it very low self-discharge. This means that you are purchasing an already charged battery.
eneloop is as user-friendly as a disposable battery. Once charged, it keeps its charge for up to 6 to 12 months - (90 per cent of the charge after 6 months, 85 per cent after 12 months)
In contrast to a disposable battery, eneloop can be charged up to 1000 times, thus eliminating the waste of 999 disposable batteries.

Using eneloop rechargeable batteries really does pay off. Considering the cost of the eneloop battery, compared to a disposable battery, plus cost for the charger and the energy consumed by the charger, the investment for one eneloop returns easily after a few charging cycles. Now there's an end to this spending.
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#1
They are also £3 to £4 more expensive. They are not THAT much better, if at all.

If Eneloops is what you're insisting on though - not a bad price!

Edited By: JayDubya on Aug 04, 2010 14:35: add a sentence
#2
Having used Eneloop or similar for a couple of years, I wouldnt use standard rechargeables anymore.

I bought Panasonic Infinium (equivalent to Eneloop) recently from 7dayshop. The 4 pack of AAs was less then £6 delivered, so cheaper than this deal.

Edit. Just checked, they are £5.99 or £5.79 each for 2-3 packs. They are 2100mah as opposed to 2000 for the Eneloop

Edited By: skdotcom on Aug 04, 2010 14:48: .
#3
JayDubya
They are also £3 to £4 more expensive. They are not THAT much better, if at all.If Eneloops is what you're insisting on though - not a bad price!

OK, as yet they cost more. Retaining their charge for so
much longer means they will be charged up much less
in the long run and therefore last far longer than
"ordinary rechargeables." So yes, they ARE a better
battery.
#4
If you want Eneloop and really good value, get the "Ready-to-Go" from 7-dayshop for £3.99 for 4 (or less if you buy more).
#5
pet2000
If you want Eneloop and really good value, get the "Ready-to-Go" from 7-dayshop for £3.99 for 4 (or less if you buy more).


I think you mean "if you want Eneloop-type...".

If you want a branded type and a set of AAAs to go with them then these Hybrio packs are a good deal IMHO

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Uniross-Battery-Pocket-4AAA-Batteries/dp/B003INT1XS

I know they are Amazon Marketplace but the sellers get decent ratings.
#6
pet2000
If you want Eneloop and really good value, get the "Ready-to-Go" from 7-dayshop for £3.99 for 4 (or less if you buy more).

I agree, I have had two packs of these, they are very good.
#7
gluke21
JayDubya
They are also £3 to £4 more expensive. They are not THAT much better, if at all.If Eneloops is what you're insisting on though - not a bad price!


OK, as yet they cost more. Retaining their charge for so
much longer means they will be charged up much less
in the long run and therefore last far longer than
"ordinary rechargeables." So yes, they ARE a better
battery.


No - I'm well aware that these are hybrids, I meant that there are other much cheaper hybrid alternatives, which perform perfectly well in real world applications. As someone else suggested, the 7ds options, or others prefer GP, Hybrio, etc. all of which are cheaper.
#8
WOW!
#9
From my experience the charge retaining batteries tend to fail much quicker than the traditional charge losing ones. I also see little difference between any of the makes I have used: eneloop, hybrio, or recycko.

I have never paid more than £3-£4 for a pack of 4 aa. If you keep a look out, they are often cheaper than this deal.
#10
Flake99
From my experience the charge retaining batteries tend to fail much quicker than the traditional charge losing ones. I also see little difference between any of the makes I have used: eneloop, hybrio, or recycko.

I have never paid more than £3-£4 for a pack of 4 aa. If you keep a look out, they are often cheaper than this deal.

I've only been using Eneloop for three years or so, but currently they are all still going strong, whereas apart from some fairly old and very low capacity "industrial" AA traditional Nicads I have and a set of 4 low capacity uniross cells, all the traditional NIMH cells I've bought prior to getting Eneloops deteriorated to the point of near uselessness within 1 year.


Edited By: melted on Aug 04, 2010 19:34: no h
Edited By: melted on Aug 04, 2010 19:36: 1
#11
Flake99
From my experience the charge retaining batteries tend to fail much quicker than the traditional charge losing ones. I also see little difference between any of the makes I have used: eneloop, hybrio, or recycko.

I have never paid more than £3-£4 for a pack of 4 aa. If you keep a look out, they are often cheaper than this deal.


I have had the complete opposite experience - most of my standard rechargeable batteries are no longer useable.

I also have little faith in non-branded rechargeables - despite claims they are as good as Sanyo, Panasonic, Uniross etc - they have never performed as well for me.
#12
In a few tests I have seen the uniross hybrio batteries were better than the sanyo eneloop ones, hardly surprising as though sanyo may have pioneered the technology other companies improved on it.

Here is one such thread:

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/batteries-power-packs/105368-hybrio-v-eneloop.html
#13
I thought Sanyo had patents, which makes it hard for other manufacturer's to improve on, also that another company developed a LSD at the same time using competing technology see http://www.eetimes.com/electronics-products/other/4080013/Discharge-free-NiMH-batteries-roll-out

Also it depends how you define better, the tests I've looked out typically indicate that Eneloop have the lowest self discharge rate, lower internal resistance, and higher voltage under load, and that hybrio have slightly higher capacity. Although I've also seen it claimed that the hybrio batteries can vary, depending on where/by who they were manufacturered and that some appear to be rebranded eneloops.

Also Sanyo have a new improved Eneloop out - retain 75% of their capacity over 3 years, 1500 recharge cycles and closer to 2100mah - see :- http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003VLAEPQ/ref=nosim/?tag=fatwalletcom&linkCode=as1 and the reviews.




Edited By: melted on Aug 07, 2010 16:52: spelling

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