SCHWALBE Marathon Plus bicycle tyres £19 @ Spa - HotUKDeals
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SCHWALBE Marathon Plus bicycle tyres £19.00 @ Spa

Baldieman64 Avatar
6y, 3m agoFound 6 years, 3 months ago
RRP is £29 each. They can usually be had for about £25 each with free P&P if you shop around but these are £19 each with P&P for a pair costing just £3.

Ride through broken glass! The new Marathon Plus with SMART GUARD makes it possible thanks to the highly flexible, special rubber layer. The revolutionary feature of this new puncture protection system is its 'super-ball' characteristics. The Smart Guard special rubber protection belt is so flexible that it has no effect on rolling resistance, unlike traditional puncture protection systems which increase a tire's rolling resistance. The approximate 200 gram extra weight compared with the 'classic' Marathon is hardly noticeable in everyday use.


Protects reliably against everyday tire killers: Pointed or sharp objects stand little chance of penetrating the tire. Due to its high elasticity, any sharp object that tries to penetrate Smart Guard is actively pushed back out.
In addition to the tread and carcass thickness, five millimetres of belt brings the total to nearly a centimetre of material. Shards, flints and glass that embed in the tread will not penetrate.
With reflective sidewall
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Baldieman64 Avatar
6y, 3m agoFound 6 years, 3 months ago
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#1
Genuinely good price on some highly respected tyres.
1 Like #2
Cracking price for a great tyre. Got these on my 'ride to work' and never had a puncture - lots of broken glass and all sorts, no worries!:3
#3
JasperTheTank
Cracking price for a great tyre. Got these on my 'ride to work' and never had a puncture - lots of broken glass and all sorts, no worries!:3


second that ...these tyres rock have them on my commuter bike ...!!
#4
Crackin' tyres for a very reasonable price! So tempted but just recently upgraded my currents, hmmm...
#5
would these fit on my standard 'mountain bike' - they are slicks or are they road bike tyres? Sorry if that sounds like a stupid question but I am stupid :)
#6
leedale30
would these fit on my standard 'mountain bike' - they are slicks or are they road bike tyres? Sorry if that sounds like a stupid question but I am stupid :)


They do 26" which would probably be the size wheels you have on your MTB. These are road tyres with some tred.
#7
Great tyres, virtually puncture proof. Great price.
#8
Personally i'd opt for Schwalbe Big Apples. A good compromise between speed, punture protection and comfort.

While the Marathon Plus are almost bombproof, the ride isn't awesome.
#9
looks like a cracking tyre I wish I had seen these a month ago before I did the C 2 C on full MTB tyres !
#10
I've been buying this tyre from Spa cycles for a while now.

Quick delivery, great price and the tyre is excellent for city riding. The ride may not be the greatest in the world, but when using my bike for transport my no 1 priority is not to have to end up at the side of the road fixing a puncture.

In fact I don't think I've ever had a puncture on one of these (although I've had a couple of occasions when the front wheel was stolen or damaged beyond repair and I lost the tyre that way).
#11
I've got these on at the moment, but I'm going to get some more now, I think, so I've got some ready for when I need to replace them :)

Thanks!
1 Like #12
After much research, I decided on these tyres for road, canal towpath and riverbank riding because they roll fairly freely yet have enough grip to deal with muddy trails and are very well regarded for puncture resistance.
No, they're not suitable for forrest trails and rock hopping but for the sort of rough commuting that I'll use them for, they look to be just the job. With the reflective sidewalls, they'll also offer more winter visibility from the side where my front facing light cluster isn't always easy to see.
Having found this price that saved me about 8 or 9 pounds on the cost of a delivered pair, I thought I'd share.
#13
I have the standard marathon ones and they are great too, but these must be even better, I have cycled 900 miles on them with only one puncture, but that was a very fine, thin piece of metal, otherwise i have rode over glass virtually every day, It's amazing how much broken glass there is on the roads. These tyres are a Godsend.
Recommended!
#14
these are awesome if you are a regular commuter on ya bike these are invaluable, i had the kevlon tyres from halfords on my carrera subway and was getting punctures every 1-2 weeks, had a pair of these on for 5 months now with not a single puncture...simply awesome and well worth the investment! Voted hot cos i paid £29 each from my local cycle shop
#15
bluespace77
Personally i'd opt for Schwalbe Big Apples. A good compromise between speed, punture protection and comfort.

While the Marathon Plus are almost bombproof, the ride isn't awesome.


I wouldn't advise that. These tyres don't run that hard, not compared to my Specialized Armadillo tyres. For commuting, where punctures make you late, I'd get these as the compromise actually.
#16
> The approximate 200 gram extra weight compared with the 'classic' Marathon is hardly noticeable in everyday use.

That is an interesting statement. You have to take into account that the tyres are moving faster, so the effective inertial is 3 times the weight. Times two tires, and you get an additional inertial of over a kg. I think I would skip that and just use the regular Marathon - they are amazing.
#17
Great tyres but if you're putting them on a mountain bike and are used to taking shortcuts across wet grass beware! No idea how they fair in icy conditions, anybody..?
#18
These tyre's are getting alot of praise, i've ordered some to give 'em a test :D
#19
MrPuddington
> The approximate 200 gram extra weight compared with the 'classic' Marathon is hardly noticeable in everyday use.

That is an interesting statement. You have to take into account that the tyres are moving faster, so the effective inertial is 3 times the weight. Times two tires, and you get an additional inertial of over a kg. I think I would skip that and just use the regular Marathon - they are amazing.
Why three times the weight? Wouldn't it depend on what speed you're doing? And would you really notice? Like the other posters here, I have nothing but praise for these tyres, which have never punctured in about two years of commuting about 20 miles a day. The only problem I have is that they are slightly larger circumference than normal tyres, which can interfere with mudguards.
#20
Even these great tyres can be punctured by thorns, especially blackthorn, once dry they are like nails and can even go through a car tyre. Warning - these are very hard to put back on the rims, so keep some pieces of cord to hold it in place whilst fitting.

To sum up - I have only had one puncture in 10000 miles and think the Marathon Plus are well worth the extra weight. The rolling resistance/ride is very good on my Kona.
#21
I have these on my MTB, instead of big fat knobblies.

Like lots of people I bought a MTB in haste and regretted it soon after.

The closest we get to off roading is canal tow paths and these are fine for that and perfect for commuting.

We rode from London to Paris on MTBs using these and had no problems.

I agree with the comments about wet grass, my daughter has a set and came a cropper in the local park last week, so not for everyone.

leedale30
would these fit on my standard 'mountain bike' - they are slicks or are they road bike tyres? Sorry if that sounds like a stupid question but I am stupid :)
#22
Ive got a standard Merida Mountain Bike with 26" tyres. Which of the 'drop down' sizes do i need to order?
#23
Something else to be aware of is how tough these are to fit for the first time - do yourself a favour and order some steel tyre changing tools with the tyres because you have no chance with the plastic/cheapo ones that come with puncture repair kits, they will just bend and break. They're not so tough to get off once 'worn in' - I've only had one occasion I needed to do that when a cheap innertube blebbed at the valve area - nothing to do with the tyre and it came off and went back on much more easily but still required those steel tyre changers.
#24
Another vote from me for these tyres. In two years I've had one puncture and that was a huge piece of glass - previous tyres would puncture from tiny slivers that you can barely see with the naked eye. You get the kind of dependability you expect from a car tyre.

As I commute with loaded panniers I'm not bothered about a bit of weight. However, they can be a bit 'squirmy' on a wet surface - just feels odd, I've not had one let go.

Some say it's worth checking the tread regularly and pulling out any bits of glass or thorn that are stuck in the 'smartguard' layer before they penetrate further (let the tyre down first). Personally I only do that every few months and I've not had any problems.
#25
Would these fit a mountain bike current tyres 26x2.10? The Schwalbe 26" are apparently 26x1.35. I'm looking to convert my Mountain bike into a more of a commuter and don't want something that is likely to pick up punctures. Also will I need new inner tubes?

Edited By: softpurple on Aug 18, 2010 12:31: edit
#26
Great tyres. Yes, they are a bit heavy but the trade-off is hardly any punctures and, although they are not the fastest tyres either they roll along pretty well. I have a 26" on the rear and a 20" on the front of my recumbent. In the past 16 months I’ve done over 6000 miles on them without a single puncture. Highly recommended! Hot!

Whatever you do though don’t use metal tyre levers on your wheels as you could damage the alloy rims. Only use plastic levers like Pedro’s tyre levers. Ignore farbuckle’s advice or you could do more harm than good.
#27
It doesn't say it's for a pair. But if it is, it's a good deal and then so would all Spa's tyres.
#28
JunkMail


Whatever you do though don’t use metal tyre levers on your wheels as you could damage the alloy rims. Only use plastic levers like Pedro’s tyre levers. Ignore farbuckle’s advice or you could do more harm than good.

Interesting point, there are certainly different strengths of tyre levers out there, I couldn't get the tyre off with two or three I tried - all cheap ones, so I invested in some decent steel ones from Wiggle. Personally I would rather take the steel ones with me because I know they won't fail - not sure what damage they can do because the tyres are only stretched to the extent that they lift over from the rim and the levers are well rounded. Do you have any sources that verify your claim because It seems a rather ridiculous statement? Good old fashioned levers were always metal, plastic is just much cheaper to make.
#29
hotman
It doesn't say it's for a pair. But if it is, it's a good deal and then so would all Spa's tyres.
The OP doesn't say that it's for a pair. But the OP is being misleading by not including the delivery charge in the headline price.
#30
farbuckle
Good old fashioned levers were always metal
Perhaps they were just designed for good old wheels - in other words, steel rims? I seem to cope OK with plastic tyre levers but it always surprises me that they don't break.
#31
pibpob
farbuckle
Good old fashioned levers were always metal
Perhaps they were just designed for good old wheels - in other words, steel rims? I seem to cope OK with plastic tyre levers but it always surprises me that they don't break.

Maybe more care needs to be taken with metal levers but I'd rather have that extra force available than risk breaking some of the plastic levers - it's clearly a debatable issue though and it depends on which plastic levers you have as some have metal cores... These tyres are particularly difficult to put on and remove though so don't just buy a puncture repair kit from the pound shop and expect the levers to remove them because they probably won't.
#32
I always use tea spoons to get my tyres off.
#33
leedale30
I always use tea spoons to get my tyres off.

Wooden spoons would be safer ;)
#34
I'm a bike n00b so obviously I'm going to ask a stupid question now. I have a Raleigh Mustang (aluminium frame) it cost me £99 new from Halfords reduced from £199 about 5 or 6 years ago. I've just completely overhauled it, I want to use it for road use, so here's the dumb question is it worth me putting these tyres on a useless lump of crap that I currently own?

Whilst the bike gurus are on here, here's another question > The aluminium frame has corroded, the lacquer has knackered up on it after being stored under an asbestos roofed bike shed for so long, is there any way to sort out the corrosion or do I have to strip the bike down and nitromors the frame etc?
#35
Nice deal.
#36
@ farbuckle - I hope that you didn’t think that I was having a dig at you personally because I assure you that that was not my intent. However, if you go into any reputable cycle shop and ask them they will tell you that you should never use metal tyre levers on alloy rims as they could cause damage. I have always found that I can get my Marathons on without the use of tyre levers at all apart from occasionally at the very final stage. The trick is to make sure that the tyre is seated in the lowest part of the rim when you are putting it on. That usually gives you the extra clearance necessary to pop the tyre on with your thumbs.

Changing A Bicycle Tyre - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXnTqP7Nd_o
#37
Got a puncture on my first outing on Marathons but nothing since. Well worth riding these.
#38
I have bought two sets of pluses from spa at the above price.

They are a heavy tyre but they are worth it for the protection.

If you need speed and 'p' protection then go for schwalbe marathon supreme, they really are the business, I paid £25 a tyre.

Done about 1500 commuting miles on the supremes and never had a 'p' yet

Edited By: marco67 on Aug 18, 2010 19:54: spelling
#39
JunkMail
@ farbuckle - I hope that you didn’t think that I was having a dig at you personally because I assure you that that was not my intent. However, if you go into any reputable cycle shop and ask them they will tell you that you should never use metal tyre levers on alloy rims as they could cause damage. I have always found that I can get my Marathons on without the use of tyre levers at all apart from occasionally at the very final stage. The trick is to make sure that the tyre is seated in the lowest part of the rim when you are putting it on. That usually gives you the extra clearance necessary to pop the tyre on with your thumbs.

Changing A Bicycle Tyre - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXnTqP7Nd_o

I'm not going to argue the point other than you stated that nobody should use
metal levers but we don't all have expensive fragile wheels and not everybody
is heavy handed with tools. It seems the best compromise for these Marathons
may be plastic levers with a metal core.
#40
@ farbuckle - I think that the problem may be that you have had a bad experience with plastic tyre levers. I have come a few that quite frankly are not fit for purpose. They are made out of the wrong kind of plastic and are too bendy. Please believe me that a good pair of plastic tyre levers will only set you back a pound or two and they are well worth it. You don’t need to have expensive rims to justify this small cost and it is better than your tyre being damaged because of a score or nick on the rim.

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