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scotland on sunday Deals & Discounts

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Scotland on Sunday - Free Robert Burns Poetry Book

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Scotland on Sunday - Free Robert Burns Poetry Book Free Burns Book inside every copy of Scotland On Sunday today Scotland on Sunday celebrates the birth of the Bard with a FREE book - 'A
lucerysmum Avatar5y, 10m agoFound 5 years, 10 months ago5 Comments
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Rubisco
Valhalla1
Auld Lang Syne - composed by William Shield from Gateshead. Long way frae bonny scotland:-)
Nonsense.

Wikipedia
The most recent revival of the "Shield wrote Auld Lang Syne" story seems to date from 1998, when John Treherne, Gateshead’s Head of Schools' Music Service, uncovered an original edition of the opera Rosina in the Gateshead Public Library, while he was looking for new works for the town's youth orchestra. "I thought it was appropriate to look at the work of a Gateshead-born composer. I picked out Rosina by Shield," Mr Treherne said. "I started to copy out the score and hummed the tune as I was writing it down. I was coming to the end when I realized the tune floating through my head was Auld Lang Syne." However, despite Treherne's rediscovery, Shield's use of the 'Old Lang Syne' melody had already been thoroughly debated in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

The melody concerned (which exists as a brief quotation near the end of the Rosina overture) - has been claimed to be the source of the tune to Robert Burns' famous song, and Shield's own composition. Both claims seem to be highly unlikely, a very much more probable case being that both Shield and Burns independently borrowed the tune, or at least its general outline, from an old folk song.

Rather more likely, but just as liable to raise Scots hackles, is the possibility that the melody itself may be English (specifically Northumbrian) rather than Scots! However, the original provenance of many British folk melodies is doubtful - and after all Northumbria and Lowland Scotland are contiguous, and have strong cultural affinities. Claims that the tune must be Scots because even its quotation in the Rosina overture imitates the drones of a bagpipe ignore the existence of the Northumbrian smallpipes, which Shield very likely had in mind.

Incidentally, the theme from the Rosina overture is not identical to the melody to which Auld Lang Syne is sung - in fact it is closer, especially in tempo and rhythm, to Comin' Through the Rye.


Oh dear - do you believe every word in Wikipedia? Do you know who posts on wikipedia? The general public that's who. it is a very subjective site not supported by one ounce of fact.
SNEEZY
Cost depends where you live. think it's a £1 in the west of scotland today. Saw that stupid advert during the week


thanks ;)
Cost depends where you live. think it's a £1 in the west of scotland today. Saw that stupid advert during the week
Valhalla1
Auld Lang Syne - composed by William Shield from Gateshead. Long way frae bonny scotland:-)
Nonsense.

Wikipedia
The most recent revival of the "Shield wrote Auld Lang Syne" story seems to date from 1998, when John Treherne, Gateshead’s Head of Schools' Music Service, uncovered an original edition of the opera Rosina in the Gateshead Public Library, while he was looking for new works for the town's youth orchestra. "I thought it was appropriate to look at the work of a Gateshead-born composer. I picked out Rosina by Shield," Mr Treherne said. "I started to copy out the score and hummed the tune as I was writing it down. I was coming to the end when I realized the tune floating through my head was Auld Lang Syne." However, despite Treherne's rediscovery, Shield's use of the 'Old Lang Syne' melody had already been thoroughly debated in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

The melody concerned (which exists as a brief quotation near the end of the Rosina overture) - has been claimed to be the source of the tune to Robert Burns' famous song, and Shield's own composition. Both claims seem to be highly unlikely, a very much more probable case being that both Shield and Burns independently borrowed the tune, or at least its general outline, from an old folk song.

Rather more likely, but just as liable to raise Scots hackles, is the possibility that the melody itself may be English (specifically Northumbrian) rather than Scots! However, the original provenance of many British folk melodies is doubtful - and after all Northumbria and Lowland Scotland are contiguous, and have strong cultural affinities. Claims that the tune must be Scots because even its quotation in the Rosina overture imitates the drones of a bagpipe ignore the existence of the Northumbrian smallpipes, which Shield very likely had in mind.

Incidentally, the theme from the Rosina overture is not identical to the melody to which Auld Lang Syne is sung - in fact it is closer, especially in tempo and rhythm, to Comin' Through the Rye.
Auld Lang Syne - composed by William Shield from Gateshead. Long way frae bonny scotland:-)
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In Scotland on Sunday (newspaper) - Free Road Map of Scotland

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FREE Road Map of Scotland In Scotland on Sunday today get your FREE Road Map of Scotland*. This full colour, foldable map is updated for 2011, handy for your car or home. The map is free and in…
lucerysmum Avatar5y, 10m agoFound 5 years, 10 months ago31 Comments
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makkax1
They have roads?


he he. Now that IS funny.
They have roads?
OK i've had a clean up of the swearing and swear filter avoidance, keep it clean please, remember its a family forum.
wagamamaluva
tonypop
Its a shame we have a few dumb people, who think that HDUK is only for England and its residents!!Decent freebie,will always cme in handy!
It is. It's also a shame so many people from Scotland become so defensive and offensive so quickly and unnecessarily.

The point is we are all British and should be proud of that,we are all ONE!! however posting idiotic comments helps no-one!! If you want to joke, you should make it more obvious rather than making it look lik you are a pig headed fool
alan mcculloch
The roads as we know them were invented by Robert MacAdam hence Tarmacadam abreviated to tarmac.He was a Scot surprisingly enough.

Best comment on the whole thread.

And Scotland seems to be getting increasingily popular with the Sassenachs, white settlers everywhere :-(
40Expired

free scottish artists cd with scotland on sunday this sunday!

15
includes franz fredinand idlewild teenage fan club and many more festival of summer sounds
pinkshaz Avatar6y, 5m agoFound 6 years, 5 months ago15 Comments
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thanks Hun ;)
Voted hot by me
PS it costs £1.60 but well worth it.
Jock J;8819057
Yes I happen to Scottish lots of times, You don't happen to speak English!:?


lol, yeah, forgot the 'be' out of that sentence didn't I? :p

Batteries are going flat in my keyboard. That's my excuse anyways :-D
rufus bezak;8818828
Do you happen to Scottish per chance, old chap? :p


Yes I happen to Scottish lots of times, You don't happen to speak English!:?
Idlewild and Arab Strap are brilliant, should be a good CD :-)
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