Sharp LC32LE600E 32 Inch LED Backlight HD Ready 1080p Television with Integrated Freeview £379.99 @ Co-op Electrical - HotUKDeals
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Seems a good price to me. I may be wrong?

Use voucher code CFS0810 for this price

Additional Info

* 80cm Visible LED Backlight TV
* HD Ready 1080p
* Integrated Digital 'Freeview' Tuner
* Ultra Bright White LED
* Full LED Backlight System
* New X-GEN Panel
* 1920 x 1080 resolution
* Natural Clear Technology
* Brilliant Colour Processor
* Dolby Digital Plus Surround Sound
* x3 HDMI connections
* CI Slot
* PC Input
* Uses upto 40% less energy than traditional LCD Televisions
* Energy Saving Trust recommended
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nseaman Avatar
6y, 7m agoFound 6 years, 7 months ago
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#1
Seems like a good deal for an LED TV. Too bad most new TVs are still coming with crappy Freeview SD instead of Freeview HD. You would think that a new LED would at least have Freeview HD.
#2
that is a great price for an led backlight tv, this is the cheapest ive seen, hot mate
#3
Seems like a good deal to me too - the LED TVs I've found so far have looked awesome but well over £500 for a 1080 32 inch.
#4
Just went for it! Looking at amazon the same model retails for well over £500. Has three HDMI ports too. Heat added!
#5
This is the same model that everywhere has been selling off, you can even get the 42" version for sub £500.

And theres a reason for it, its cheap and tacky, and really doesnt work very well.

Unless you love lots of motion blur, then this would be perfect for you.
#6
Mana786
Seems like a good deal for an LED TV. Too bad most new TVs are still coming with crappy Freeview SD instead of Freeview HD. You would think that a new LED would at least have Freeview HD.


Even with a Freeview HD receiver most channels you'll receive will still be in SD.

My FreeSat HD TV's only have 2 HD channels and 1 of those is only part-time.

Even in the longer term, this situation won't change much as the technologies won't allow many more HD channels to be added.


striker33
This is the same model that everywhere has been selling off, you can even get the 42" version for sub £500.
And theres a reason for it, its cheap and tacky, and really doesnt work very well.
Unless you love lots of motion blur, then this would be perfect for you.


It's not a bad TV. Just not as good as the Toshiba's and Samsung's LEDs.

http://www.expertreviews.co.uk/tvs/276292/sharp-aquos-lc32le600e
#7
When you can get a Samsung 32" for less than £300, (on the high st !) paying so much for something that isn't as good hardly appeals - voted cold, sorry.
#8
is the samsung led?
#9
you can also get the 40inch from ebuye (hxxp://www.ebuyer.com/product/174203) for £598, deal?
#10
This is 1080p too don't forget. you won't find a 1080p 32in Samsung for less than £350 and the one's I've seen weren't LED either, plus they only had two HDMI ports where as this has three which I need.

Mine arrives Saturday so will let you know how I get on!
#11
Voted lukewarm. Good price but not a Panasonic.
#12
I have this TV previously brought from Makro. Awesome TV HD is really good quality. Connected to my XBOX 360 and my PC Via HDMI. One thing that is on the downside is that on SD its really blocky. I do advise you guys to buy a seperate freeview, possibly HD one.
#13
So what's better - a decent LCD or a cheap LED?
#15
Johnboy_1975
So what's better - a decent LCD or a cheap LED?


where to start?

both have great selling features and price points.

do YOUR homework, don't let somebody else pressure YOU into buying the wrong set.

when you have found the right TV, stop checking price comparison websites because it will only get cheaper + new models come out all the time.

the lesson here is to be content with what you have, otherwise you will always be disappointed.
#16
Johnboy_1975
So what's better - a decent LCD or a cheap LED?


Edge mounted LED backlighting does not produce lighting that is as uniform as a TV with rear mounted CCFL backlighting. This stands to reason, so no further explanation is required to discuss why this is the case. However, LEDs use less energy than CCFL lighting and are cheaper to manufacture (which we are now beginning to see after the initial LED rip offs from the TV manufacturers). For the best of both Worlds you need a TV with rear-mounted LED array that allows for uniform distribution of the lighting (so no dark and bright patches). Furthermore, rear-mounted LED lighting can be set to localise dimming of the light - you cannot localise dimming on a CCFL tube as the whole tube has to be dimmed or brightened. This model of TV will use edge mounted LEDs, I suspect (but I cannot say for certain). I would take with a pinch of salt the terminology in the specifications stating "Full LED Backlight System". Also ignore the term "Ultra Bright White LED". It's completely meaningless and has no quantification at all. Also X-GEN panel is gilding the lily - again there is no industry standard definition for X-GEN so once again, it doesn't quantify anything.

EDIT: Well, I've just checked and this TV uses rear-mounted LEDs in a full matrix and consequently, problems with uniformity of lighting from edge mounted LEDs are addressed. This puts it in a category above most CCFL lit LCD TVs which makes the price relatively good value.
#17
Johnboy_1975
So what's better - a decent LCD or a cheap LED?


It still depends on the panel doesn't it?

LED tv's still use LCD panels but use LED bulbs to light them up.

These tv's use above average panels from what I read and the only problem was that sometimes when the bulbs would turn themselves off on certain area's, it wouldn't be as accurate as it could be.... or something.

That's what I've read, anyway ::oops:

I bought the Samsung LED 7 series but it was really between that and this series.

Voted hot, good price.
#18
ZanPan
It still depends on the panel doesn't it?

LED tv's still use LCD panels but use LED bulbs to light them up.

These tv's use above average panels from what I read and the only problem was that sometimes when the bulbs would turn themselves off on certain area's, it wouldn't be as accurate as it could be.... or something.

That's what I've read, anyway ::oops:

I bought the Samsung LED 7 series but it was really between that and this series.

Voted hot, good price.


I'm not sure what you are referring to with regards to accuracy but it appears what you have read is incorrect. As I stated earlier, localised dimming is an advantage as it can accurately dim a specific area of a screen, hence the name. What I was referring to was that lighting from CCFL is non-uniform and this is also applicable to edge-mounted LEDs. You can't expect a light source to travel from the edge of the screen to the centre without losing any intensity and for CCFL, you can't expect a relatively large light source to spread over an entire area of the screen with the same intensity. This is why rear-mounted matrices of LEDs are such an advantage since the light sources originate from a matrix and a more uniform screen brightness can be produced. With localised dimming, darker areas can be more accurately produced rather than just blocking out backlight as in the case of traditional CCFL lit LCD TVs.
#19
What does 'HDMI' mean please?

Sorry am a non-techie person::oops: and I want a TV where I can use headphones.

Thanks all. xx
#20
Annap
What does 'HDMI' mean please?

Sorry am a non-techie person::oops: and I want a TV where I can use headphones.

Thanks all. xx


HDMI is an interface used for transmitting audio and video. It is capable of transmitting uncompressed audio and video although in practice, the data is usually compressed (such as Blu Ray content). The data is also digitally encoded.

HDMI is an industry wide standard and mandates on the type of data that can pass through the interface such as tolerances to interference. It can also encapsulate HDCP decryption (but this is NOT mandated). HDCP is an Intel technology used to decrypt media that has been encoded and therefore to play back such media (such as Blu Ray), the HDMI interface must also possess HDCP decryption.

HDMI to headphones is technically possible but requires a decoder in the headphones or an intermediary device to perform the decoding (such as an AV receiver). I am not aware of headphones with built in decoders that connect directly to an HDMI socket. If you wish to connect headphones to the TV, the usual method is via input jacks on the TV or via the SCART or SVideo or coaxial sockets supporting audio output. There maybe other obscure methods such as BlueTooth for wireless headphones but once again, I am not aware of any TVs supporting BlueTooth (they should do as it is so simple).
#21
Hi Elliott,

Thanks for the info:-D
#22
Did anyone get one of these?

Hope you're pleased with it

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