Single To 4 Way Socket Convertor £1 @ Poundland - HotUKDeals
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Single To 4 Way Socket Convertor £1.00 @ Poundland

lurch Avatar
6y, 8m agoFound 6 years, 8 months ago
Seen these in shops for about £5/£6 so thought this was a good deal.

Plug into mains socket converting it to a multiple 4 way socket.

Max load 13A
Total not exceed 3000W
BS5733/A
BS1363-3/A

This deal has been around for ages and posted before!!!
- seefman
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lurch Avatar
6y, 8m agoFound 6 years, 8 months ago
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#1
its a good price but they have had those for around a year and they have been posted before
#2
FYI its 13amp in total for all 4 sockets not 13amp each.
#3
I did put Max load 13A in the description.
#4
Good price! i paid about £8 each for these as not as bulky as the 3 way adapters that stick out like a big plug !
Good find :)
#5
Cheers, Heat applied.

I paid £1.99 for the same thing a couple of years ago. It's a bit flimsy and needs two hands to remove one plug without disturbing the other three plugs.

I perhaps should point out that the shape is designed to be perfect fit into a wall socket (you can't really tell from the photo). That way it fits flush with the wall. Unfortunately that also means it often cannot be used in conjunction with another extension lead or multiway adaptor.

Having said that whay I really want is the version with individual colour-coded switches on each socket. Cheapest I've seen those is £5.99.
#6
nick1austin


I perhaps should point out that the shape is designed to be perfect fit into a wall socket (you can't really tell from the photo). That way it fits flush with the wall. Unfortunately that also means it often cannot be used in conjunction with another extension lead or multiway adaptor.


Why not? Just plug this in first, then the extension/multiway into this??

That said, theres no way I would plug another adaptor into it - fire hazard anyone!
#7
lurch
I did put Max load 13A in the description.


I know, I was reminding people who dont realise that you can only fill the strip with plugs that add up to 13 amp in total. A lot of people would put 4 x 13amp plugs in it and have them all powered up.
banned#8
mosskeeto
its a good price but they have had those for around a year and they have been posted before


Exactly...
#9
seefman
Exactly...


So? has it been posted recently then?

Cause I've not seen it and now I know about it - So it gets Heat from me
#10
MrShed
Why not? Just plug this in first, then the extension/multiway into this??

That said, theres no way I would plug another adaptor into it - fire hazard anyone!


Strictly speaking it is not a fire hazard at all... It is not good from a mechanical point in this case so I wouldn't do it for that reason alone.
Regarding multiple extensions as long as all plug sockets / contacts are clean and not tarnished / oxidized etc. (i.e. really old or showing yellowing / arcing or other odd signs) and the load isn't too high then there should never be a problem. You should see my computer and bench area I have a total of about 30 sockets over 3 extensions (not daisy chained but radial from main extension) but then I do check them every so often and always use a common sense approach as to what I can and cannot plug in. 5A fuse protects the lot so I know the load is never too high.

One bad 13A plug or socket can be more of a hazard than any number of good 'extended' extensions which is why it is worth checking everything from time to time.
#11
I think i'd rather have piece of mind and use a surge protector though
#12
how safe is a 4 way extention for £1?
#13
ollyk
Strictly speaking it is not a fire hazard at all... It is not good from a mechanical point in this case so I wouldn't do it for that reason alone.
Regarding multiple extensions as long as all plug sockets / contacts are clean and not tarnished / oxidized etc. (i.e. really old or showing yellowing / arcing or other odd signs) and the load isn't too high then there should never be a problem. You should see my computer and bench area I have a total of about 30 sockets over 3 extensions (not daisy chained but radial from main extension) but then I do check them every so often and always use a common sense approach as to what I can and cannot plug in. 5A fuse protects the lot so I know the load is never too high.

One bad 13A plug or socket can be more of a hazard than any number of good 'extended' extensions which is why it is worth checking everything from time to time.


Sorry maybe should quantify more.

You are of course dead right - but going up to 7/8 sockets from a single "main" socket is encouraging excessive load to most people.
#14
ollyk
Strictly speaking it is not a fire hazard at all... It is not good from a mechanical point in this case so I wouldn't do it for that reason alone.
Regarding multiple extensions as long as all plug sockets / contacts are clean and not tarnished / oxidized etc. (i.e. really old or showing yellowing / arcing or other odd signs) and the load isn't too high then there should never be a problem. You should see my computer and bench area I have a total of about 30 sockets over 3 extensions (not daisy chained but radial from main extension) but then I do check them every so often and always use a common sense approach as to what I can and cannot plug in. 5A fuse protects the lot so I know the load is never too high.

One bad 13A plug or socket can be more of a hazard than any number of good 'extended' extensions which is why it is worth checking everything from time to time.


I've never really understood what the fire hazard from overloading is all about. Sure if too much current travels through an underrated plug which cannot handle it it may overheat and catch on fire. But if this plug is rated at 13 A then that should never happen, and if the current drawn passes 13A then the fuse should blow.

Besides you could have 50 extensions each with a mobile phone charger plugged into them and not draw anywhere near as much as a single kettle.
#15
MrShed
Sorry maybe should quantify more.

You are of course dead right - but going up to 7/8 sockets from a single "main" socket is encouraging excessive load to most people.


Really ?
Maybe you could enlighten the masses as to what will happen to the fuse in your excessive load situation. Clue ... it wont involve fire. :whistling:
banned#16
just out of intrest i have a tumble dryer which plug gets very hot and melts the plug into the extension lead, it this problem the dryer or extension, its happened twice now

edit- i should add it gets that hot the plastic from plug and extension fuse together, ive been told its the extension lead but am a bit worried re safety
#17
If it's Poundland I guarantee it'll not be available in Newcastle.
ALL good deals there never get further north than Manchester.
#18
Billco
So? has it been posted recently then?

Cause I've not seen it and now I know about it - So it gets Heat from me


Here, here! I think some people must spend all day every day looking at HUKD & assume everyone else does too!
#19
gizmouk
Really ?
Maybe you could enlighten the masses as to what will happen to the fuse in your excessive load situation. Clue ... it wont involve fire. :whistling:


http://www.humbersidefire.gov.uk/safety/electricity.asp

Adaptors
Avoid multi-way adapters.

Overloading the socket by using several adapter into the one socket can cause it to overheat and catch fire. Overloading occur where more than 3000 watts of power are being drawn from the socket. The amount of power an appliance uses will either be on the rear of the appliance or contained within the appliance specification/manufacturer's instructions book. To check how many watts you are drawing, simply add up all the wattage ratings for each appliance you have plugged into the socket.

Remember "One appliance, One socket" is the safest thing to do.


http://www.nmrelectrical.com/Electrical-Safety/Hazards-in-the-home.html

Adaptors


Misuse of adaptors can result in an overload, which can cause the electrical circuit to overheat or trip out, the adaptor can become hot. In extreme cases a fire can result. Never use adaptors plugged into other adaptors and check that the adaptor complies with an appropriate standard and is used in compliance with the user instructions.


Ensure the adaptor is in good condition, does not get hot and has no burn marks on it. If it is damaged, replace it with a suitable adaptor complying with an appropriate standard. Having a separate socket-outlet for each item of equipment provides the safest solution. Extra socket-outlets can be installed by a registered installer.


http://www.fire-extinguisher101.com/hazards.html

Never overload a socket. The use of "octopus" outlets or "power bar", outlet extensions that accommodate several plugs, is strongly discouraged. Try to limit one high-wattage appliance into each individual outlet at a time.


http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/HomeAndCommunity/InYourHome/FireSafety/DG_071712

Plugs, sockets and cables
Plugs, sockets and cables also need to be used correctly, you should:

make sure you can’t see any coloured wires between the plug and the power lead – change the plug properly

make sure the wires are held firmly in place inside the plug

use sockets safely – it’s better to use a bar adaptor (multi board) on a lead than a block adaptor

only use one adaptor per socket – don’t plug one adaptor into another and try to keep to one plug per socket


Need I go on?

I trust the advice of professional bodies who deal with this over an internet forum poster personally.
#20
Bear in mind that the whole reason a fuse blows is because its gets HOT.
#21
shadowdogg;8241477
I think i'd rather have piece of mind and use a surge protector though
A surge protector will do nothing to prevent fires caused by overloading. Moreover, these "surge protectors" that the marketing men have convinced you you need will most likely do nothing under any circumstances - don't be fooled.
MrShed;8241604
Sorry maybe should quantify more.

You are of course dead right - but going up to 7/8 sockets from a single "main" socket is encouraging excessive load to most people.
Ring mains are limited by the area they cover, rather than the number of sockets on them, because the appliances that take a lot of power are usually heaters which are usually spread around, not concentrated in one area. In the same way, it is unlikely you will overload a single socket by plugging in a multi-way extension lead. And as has been pointed out, the fuse in the plug will prevent the total load going much above 13A.

bargainsgalore12;8243045
just out of intrest i have a tumble dryer which plug gets very hot and melts the plug into the extension lead, it this problem the dryer or extension, its happened twice now

edit- i should add it gets that hot the plastic from plug and extension fuse together, ive been told its the extension lead but am a bit worried re safety
You should not use it unattended until you have repaired it - it is a serious fire hazard! The fault could be in the plug or the socket. If you want to find out which, put the plug in a different socket.

MrShed;8243341
Bear in mind that the whole reason a fuse blows is because its gets HOT.
The whole reason it gets hot is because it has more current than it is rated for passing through it. Not quite sure what your point is.
#22
jamesdew
I've never really understood what the fire hazard from overloading is all about. Sure if too much current travels through an underrated plug which cannot handle it it may overheat and catch on fire. But if this plug is rated at 13 A then that should never happen, and if the current drawn passes 13A then the fuse should blow.

Besides you could have 50 extensions each with a mobile phone charger plugged into them and not draw anywhere near as much as a single kettle.


Heat is generated where there is a current flowing through a resistance, this is basically how heating elements work. Where ever you terminate wires (plugs / sockets and the wires within) you will see a resistance, which is determined by a number of factors, i.e. condition of terminating contacts, cross sectional area and material used to make the termination. It is these termination points that generally pose the fire risk. Like I said you should not use plugs especially with things like irons kettles etc.. that show signs of tarnishing, burning or generally overheating. If this is the case replace plug and strip the wire back in the flex so you see shiny new wire. If you do not see new wire then get flex replaced or throw away.

Also periodically open a plug and tighten the live / neutral screws as the the terminals *can* unscrew themselves after a period of time due to the vibrating nature of the mains voltage :thumbsup:

Oh and don't unplug appliances when they are on as this creates a lot of the problems above.

So as far as I am aware most appliance fires will be caused by poor connections (also incorrectly rated fuses for any given wire rating) whether that be plugs sockets or connections within the plug but I might be wrong.
#23
bargainsgalore12
just out of intrest i have a tumble dryer which plug gets very hot and melts the plug into the extension lead, it this problem the dryer or extension, its happened twice now

edit- i should add it gets that hot the plastic from plug and extension fuse together, ive been told its the extension lead but am a bit worried re safety


Throw plug away, and maybe socket too - get a decent plug from a electrical distributors and cut the wires back on the flex and make sure they look like fresh copper. This might be the problem and is a fire hazard. Also check the socket for signs of arcing / heating etc.. Dryers I think are one of the biggest contributors to house fires so make sure that plug stays cool and don't use it until sorted!
#24
pibpob
The whole reason it gets hot is because it has more current than it is rated for passing through it. Not quite sure what your point is.


I understand that.

What I am saying is that where there is (unplanned) heat, there is the potential for fire.

Unlikely in most situations, but certainly a risk.

I was merely responding to an above poster who basically said excess load wont lead to a fire, which is a completely false statement to make.
#25
ollyk
Heat is generated where there is a current flowing through a resistance, this is basically how heating elements work. Where ever you terminate wires (plugs / sockets and the wires within) you will see a resistance, which is determined by a number of factors, i.e. condition of terminating contacts, cross sectional area and material used to make the termination. It is these termination points that generally pose the fire risk. Like I said you should not use plugs especially with things like irons kettles etc.. that show signs of tarnishing, burning or generally overheating. If this is the case replace plug and strip the wire back in the flex so you see shiny new wire. If you do not see new wire then get flex replaced or throw away.

Also periodically open a plug and tighten the live / neutral screws as the the terminals *can* unscrew themselves after a period of time due to the vibrating nature of the mains voltage :thumbsup:

Oh and don't unplug appliances when they are on as this creates a lot of the problems above.

So as far as I am aware most appliance fires will be caused by poor connections (also incorrectly rated fuses for any given wire rating) whether that be plugs sockets or connections within the plug but I might be wrong.


That's the point though, its not actually that hard to figure out how much heat some copper wire will generate when 13A @ 240v travel through it and therefore the device must be designed to not burst into flames when it gets heated by however much heat that outputs. Obviously every device would eventually burst into flames/melt if you shove enough electricity through it so we have fuses to cut off the electricity supply to prevent too much current being drawn.

I don't dispute that old/crappy/tarnished/slightly burnt/damaged/cracked appliances or wiring can start fires, they most certainly can. I just don't see what overloading sockets has to do with anything.
#26
MrShed
Bear in mind that the whole reason a fuse blows is because its gets HOT.


No, its because it exceeds the ampage going thro fuse. There is a spike. No other reason.
#27
Er....coz it causes heat?
#28
Matt.Wild
No, its because it exceeds the ampage going thro fuse. There is a spike. No other reason.


Okie dokie....

(Physics 101 lesson).

And the exceeded amperage causes the fuse to blow....how?

(I'll give you a clue - if you could see inside the fuse it would look VERY red).
1 Like #29
MrShed
[url]Adaptors
Avoid multi-way adapters.

Overloading the socket by using several adapter into the one socket can cause it to overheat and catch fire. Overloading occur where more than 3000 watts of power are being drawn from the socket. The amount of power an appliance uses will either be on the rear of the appliance or contained within the appliance specification/manufacturer's instructions book. To check how many watts you are drawing, simply add up all the wattage ratings for each appliance you have plugged into the socket.

Remember "One appliance, One socket" is the safest thing to do.



I appreciate you may take government advice over people on forums, I do however have a degree in electronic engineering so I do know what I am talking about. This information seems to be oversimplifying the situation to save lives rather than risk confusing people.

3000watts / 240 v = 12.5A or at 230v a little over 13A, so basically they are saying that you should not be drawing more than 13A from a standard plug socket, which is absolutely correct.

This is correct, and a properly operating multi plug adaptor will only allow 13A to be drawn as that is the fuse included in it. The only way this could not be the case is if you have shoved some foil in the fuse or perhaps the adaptor has got very wet, or it is damaged.

This device will not allow more than 13A to be drawn no matter how many other devices you plug into it, so again. What has overloading sockets got to do with fire?
#30
MrShed
Okie dokie....

(Physics 101 lesson).

And the exceeded amperage causes the fuse to blow....how?

(I'll give you a clue - if you could see inside the fuse it would look VERY red).


You are indeed correct on this one. Fuses are comparatively quite slow when compared with RCDs and other technologies. The material inside the fuse melts once its rated current is passed. Melted metal = no connection.
#31
MrShed
I understand that.

What I am saying is that where there is (unplanned) heat, there is the potential for fire.

Unlikely in most situations, but certainly a risk.

I was merely responding to an above poster who basically said excess load wont lead to a fire, which is a completely false statement to make.


But that's my point, where is the unplanned heat? The equipment is designed to shut off (because it has a fuse) if the conditions pass tolerances. And besides number of devices is actually imo rarely a significant factor in total load. People tend to have loads of low power devices in a bedroom for example, which would not be dangerous. However people often plug a kettle and toaster into the same socket which both draw massive amounts of power. It is total current and not no of devices which is the issue. I cannot see a single reason why connecting 30 mobile phone chargers into a single socket would be dangerous.
#32
jamesdew
But that's my point, where is the unplanned heat? The equipment is designed to shut off (because it has a fuse) if the conditions pass tolerances. And besides number of devices is actually imo rarely a significant factor in total load. People tend to have loads of low power devices in a bedroom for example, which would not be dangerous. However people often plug a kettle and toaster into the same socket which both draw massive amounts of power. It is total current and not no of devices which is the issue. I cannot see a single reason why connecting 30 mobile phone chargers into a single socket would be dangerous.


I agree - but I am clearly not talking about that situation.

We are talking about a minority who actually look at this kind of thing.

A lot of people dont look at wattage and just jam it in.

The unplanned heat is generated at the plug - I agree that it is VERY unlikely to burst into flames, but a hell of a lot more likely than if there wasnt an adaptor on the end.

I do feel like I am arguing a bloody stupid point here, seeing as though it is common knowledge that adaptors (CAN LEAD TO) excess draw (CAN LEAD TO) fire.
#33
MrShed

I do feel like I am arguing a bloody stupid point here, seeing as though it is common knowledge that adaptors (CAN LEAD TO) excess draw (CAN LEAD TO) fire.


Just because it is common knowledge does not mean it is technically correct ;) That heat will not be generated because you are overloading the sockets, as these should be designed to handle the currents at least up to the value of the protection circuit (in this case a 13A fuse worst case scenario) without any warming. This assumes of course that all plugs and sockets are in good condition as I outlined previously. However, on the face of it, and for your average person I guess you are correct. Lots of dodgy appliances plugged into lots of dodgy sockets are more likely to be involved in a house fire. But equally a single appliance plugged directly into a ring socket could do the same.

One of the most dangerous situations is where you have a heavy load on the end of a large coiled up extension - but that is for another time lol!
#34
ollyk
Just because it is common knowledge does not mean it is technically correct ;) That heat will not be generated because you are overloading the sockets, as these should be designed to handle the currents at least up to the value of the protection circuit (in this case a 13A fuse worst case scenario) without any warming. This assumes of course that all plugs and sockets are in good condition as I outlined previously. However, on the face of it, and for your average person I guess you are correct. Lots of dodgy appliances plugged into lots of dodgy sockets are more likely to be involved in a house fire. But equally a single appliance plugged directly into a ring socket could do the same.

One of the most dangerous situations is where you have a heavy load on the end of a large coiled up extension - but that is for another time lol!


Ah you saved me making that reply as that is pretty much exactly what I was going to say.
#35
jamesdew
I cannot see a single reason why connecting 30 mobile phone chargers into a single socket would be dangerous.


Well firstly there'd be a lot of cables to potentially trip over and secondly 30 chargers might equal 30 phones. The signals from which may or may not lead to brain tumours and other cancers.

I'm just taking the p*** but there are some very valid points and it's all down to how people (mis) use their equipment!
#36
Wouldn't touch a poundland electrical item with a (well insulated) bargepole!!

Had an extension lead that cracked and fell open when I pulled a plug out exposing live metal.
Took it back and they said head office would look in to the problem and be in touch - still waiting.

Should have taken it to trading standards. They were of a very hard, thin plastic construction which doesn't allow the slightest bit of flexibility.

At least I could unplug my lead - if one of these broke in a similar way you'd have a job getting it out safely without having to switch the whole ring main off.

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