Six year intrest free loan upto 35000 for any plug in hybrid or electric car @ Energy Saving Trust - HotUKDeals
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Six year intrest free loan upto 35,000.00 for any plug in hybrid or electric car @ Energy Saving Trust

£35000.00 @ Energy saving trust
Loans of up to £35,000 are available to Scottish drivers to cover the cost of purchasing a new plug-in hybrid or pure electric vehicle. new cars only application available 31st March 2017 Sha…
Gerry876 Avatar
2m, 1w agoFound 2 months, 1 week ago
Loans of up to £35,000 are available to Scottish drivers to cover the cost of purchasing a new plug-in hybrid or pure electric vehicle.

new cars only

application available 31st March 2017

Shared Via The HUKD App For Android.
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Gerry876 Avatar
2m, 1w agoFound 2 months, 1 week ago
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Top Comments

(5)
23 Likes
mickgoodie
s24adm
bozzy
The most false thing about it is the zero emissions more than the economy.
Might not be any at the tail-pipe, but the coal fired power station that just charged it up just belched out the equivalent elsewhere. Some of it will be renewable, but it's just a bull$*£^# feelgood exercise.
Maybe down in Englandshire, but in Scotland (where this deal is), we actually produce a huge percentage of our electricity from renewables. In fact in a single day in August this year, the wind turbines alone produced more energy than the entire country consumed that day so with each passing year, "zero-emmisions" is certainly achievable.
ref: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/aug/11/scotland-completely-powered-by-wind-turbines-for-a-day
that easy to achieve with a population of only 5.2 million and more wind/storms than you can cope with!
down here in England its a different ball game pal in terms of demographics of people and consumption.
surely only allowing Scottish people to apply for this grant is again demonstrating the fact that you like to treat people south of Hadrian's wall differently!

The English...

Always hating what others have. Always blaming others for their problems...

The British government in Westminster have chosen not to offer these loans for the whole of the UK. It has also chosen to cut back on renewable energy investment in favour of new Nuclear deals. That has sod all to do with Scotland.

Edited By: satchef1 on Dec 16, 2016 13:06
16 Likes
bseal1947
And still using a polluting energy source to charge them up

Someone doesn't understand the efficiencies of scale. Nor the advantage of not pushing emissions out of the tailpipe in already polluted cities.

bozzy
Might not be any at the tail-pipe, but the coal fired power station that just charged it up just belched out the equivalent elsewhere. Some of it will be renewable, but it's just a bull$*£^# feelgood exercise.

Oh look, another one.


Edited By: ollie87 on Dec 16, 2016 09:14
8 Likes
118luke
Ah, the false economy of buying hybric/electric cars.
The worst depreciating cars on the market are all electric - you'd be bonkers to buy a brand new one.

Well apart from Tesla's since they announced the free supercharging is going to end. The 14 plates had dropped below £50k now they are wanting nearer £60k!

Back onto the deal. The new 41kwh Zoe will set you back about £23.5k so over 6 years that's about £325pm.

The problem with this is battery capacity is getting bigger every year and cheaper. So in 6 years time you are going to have equivalent cars with bigger batteries and smaller price tags. At the moment it makes more sense leasing one than buying an electric car.

Electric cars need more of an incentive. They are currently building an electric lane in Nottingham which will be used by electric park and ride buses but also electric cars. The thing is if you work 9-5 and use that route then it may be beneficial but once again leasing or second hand makes more sense.

I suppose if you were planning on doing big milage then buying one with a unlimited milage lease battery (£110pm) and drive it to the moon and back then getting an interest free loan is a bonus.
7 Likes
bozzy
The most false thing about it is the zero emissions more than the economy.

Might not be any at the tail-pipe, but the coal fired power station that just charged it up just belched out the equivalent elsewhere. Some of it will be renewable, but it's just a bull$*£^# feelgood exercise.
Maybe down in Englandshire, but in Scotland (where this deal is), we actually produce a huge percentage of our electricity from renewables. In fact in a single day in August this year, the wind turbines alone produced more energy than the entire country consumed that day so with each passing year, "zero-emmisions" is certainly achievable.

ref: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/aug/11/scotland-completely-powered-by-wind-turbines-for-a-day
5 Likes
Cold, you gotta move to Scotland to get this deal and it is cold there too.

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3 Likes #1
Ah, the false economy of buying hybric/electric cars.
The worst depreciating cars on the market are all electric - you'd be bonkers to buy a brand new one.
8 Likes #2
118luke
Ah, the false economy of buying hybric/electric cars.
The worst depreciating cars on the market are all electric - you'd be bonkers to buy a brand new one.

Well apart from Tesla's since they announced the free supercharging is going to end. The 14 plates had dropped below £50k now they are wanting nearer £60k!

Back onto the deal. The new 41kwh Zoe will set you back about £23.5k so over 6 years that's about £325pm.

The problem with this is battery capacity is getting bigger every year and cheaper. So in 6 years time you are going to have equivalent cars with bigger batteries and smaller price tags. At the moment it makes more sense leasing one than buying an electric car.

Electric cars need more of an incentive. They are currently building an electric lane in Nottingham which will be used by electric park and ride buses but also electric cars. The thing is if you work 9-5 and use that route then it may be beneficial but once again leasing or second hand makes more sense.

I suppose if you were planning on doing big milage then buying one with a unlimited milage lease battery (£110pm) and drive it to the moon and back then getting an interest free loan is a bonus.
1 Like #3
The deal is for pure electric or any plug in hybrid.

This brings into play Mitsubishi Phev, BMW I range, VW golf's etc.
2 Likes #4
118luke
Ah, the false economy of buying hybric/electric cars.
The worst depreciating cars on the market are all electric - you'd be bonkers to buy a brand new one.
Very true, but they are such good buy second hand.
2 Likes #5
118luke
Ah, the false economy of buying hybric/electric cars.
The worst depreciating cars on the market are all electric - you'd be bonkers to buy a brand new one.

Its only a false economy now, its like all new technology.. but they need adoption now to promote future use, and they will just become cheaper, cheaper to fuel and run longer, tech is moving very fast in this field its just battery technology thats long long overdue a breakthrough.. but investment now means that breakthrough is login to come sooner.
3 Likes #6
Oh yes the clean electric cars. Battery's built from open cast mining rare earth minerals. Thousands of miles of travel to assemble the batteries. And still using a polluting energy source to charge them up
2 Likes #7
[Fast depreciation]

We have had a plug-in Prius for four years. If we don't sell it then we don't have this issue. When I bought it I decided I was going to run it until it died.

It is so damn cheap to run. £37 fill gets you 600 miles out of a tank. And it's a pretty good size inside. Boot isn't the best, but fine for a small family week away (just!). Zero car tax helps as well.

I agree high outlay. But if you intend to keep it for the long run, then they are cheap to run on a daily basis and the financial 'hit' becomes very small if at all.

Edited By: papasb on Dec 16, 2016 08:09
1 Like #8
When you can get PCP deals on a Leaf for £189 down and £189 per month then buying an electric car makes no sense. We have run a Renault Zoe for two years and it has saved is a fortune.
2 Likes #9
Great if you want one, but I be a little concerned about the durability of some of these cars, the other thing to consider is some have a battery lease change on top of the cost of the actual car. More manufacturers / energy suppliers are doing away with free charge points and at approximately £6 for half hour charge given maybe 30 to 50 ish miles it's falling in line a how much the equivalent petrol car would cost to fuel and there's no half hour wait / limited filling points.
4 Likes #10
The most false thing about it is the zero emissions more than the economy.

Might not be any at the tail-pipe, but the coal fired power station that just charged it up just belched out the equivalent elsewhere. Some of it will be renewable, but it's just a ****** feelgood exercise.

Edited By: niceroundpound on Dec 16, 2016 16:51: .
1 Like #11
The only way for the government to force adoption of these given the limitations in range etc is to subsidise the cost like they do in the Nordic countries. Many taxis are Tesla's for example.
2 Likes #12
I bought a 14 plate Renault Zoe as ex display with under 1000 miles on the clock for under £7,000. I pay £57 per month for the battery lease and also have the cost of charging at home. I am £50 per month better off than if I had bought a diesel car for the same price and had to pay for fuel. No false economy here.
5 Likes #13
Cold, you gotta move to Scotland to get this deal and it is cold there too.
1 Like #14
how do u define "Scottish driver" ? anyone resident in Scotland is ok?
#15
Unbreakab1e
I bought a 14 plate Renault Zoe as ex display with under 1000 miles on the clock for under £7,000. I pay £57 per month for the battery lease and also have the cost of charging at home. I am £50 per month better off than if I had bought a diesel car for the same price and had to pay for fuel. No false economy here.


​less than £2 per day but got the hassle of plugging it in when its raining etc. suppose you can avoid petrol station stops so swing & roundabouts..
2 Likes #16
@bozzy - Why do you think it was a coal powered generator that produced the electricity? There's a better chance that it was produced at a gas powered station, or from renewables. In fact it's about as likely to have come from nuclear as coal.
2 Likes #17
bozzy
The most false thing about it is the zero emissions more than the economy.
Might not be any at the tail-pipe, but the coal fired power station that just charged it up just belched out the equivalent elsewhere. Some of it will be renewable, but it's just a bull$*£^# feelgood exercise.

UK produces around 25% of its electricity using renewables and this is rising to 30% by 2020. This trend will continue, so that is better than 0% and isn't some intangible feel good.
16 Likes #18
bseal1947
And still using a polluting energy source to charge them up

Someone doesn't understand the efficiencies of scale. Nor the advantage of not pushing emissions out of the tailpipe in already polluted cities.

bozzy
Might not be any at the tail-pipe, but the coal fired power station that just charged it up just belched out the equivalent elsewhere. Some of it will be renewable, but it's just a bull$*£^# feelgood exercise.

Oh look, another one.


Edited By: ollie87 on Dec 16, 2016 09:14
3 Likes #19
muffboy
Cold, you gotta move to Scotland to get this deal and it is cold there too.
I can confirm. It's freezin'
1 Like #20
ah well we cant afford to give our old people proper care but we can fund interest free loans for electric cars :( another great use of taxpayers funds by a quango
2 Likes #21
papasb
[Fast depreciation]
We have had a plug-in Prius for four years. If we don't sell it then we don't have this issue. When I bought it I decided I was going to run it until it died.
It is so damn cheap to run. £37 fill gets you 600 miles out of a tank. And it's a pretty good size inside. Boot isn't the best, but fine for a small family week away (just!). Zero car tax helps as well.
I agree high outlay. But if you intend to keep it for the long run, then they are cheap to run on a daily basis and the financial 'hit' becomes very small if at all.
I'd say that's not great value tbh, my 2016 Fiat 500X (1.6 multijet) gets filled to the brim from empty on £45 of diesel and gets me at least 500miles per tank each time, it was £12k pre-registered from arnold clark, has oodles of boot space being an SUV. It's great to drive and very nippy in sport-mode when you need it. It's £0 tax in first year then £20 per year afterwards (Group B). I don't expect it to drop a huge amount when I trade it in in a year or so. If I was compromising for an electric or hybrid, I'd be expecting to at least double or triple my miles per £ to make it worthwhile switching.
7 Likes #22
bozzy
The most false thing about it is the zero emissions more than the economy.

Might not be any at the tail-pipe, but the coal fired power station that just charged it up just belched out the equivalent elsewhere. Some of it will be renewable, but it's just a bull$*£^# feelgood exercise.
Maybe down in Englandshire, but in Scotland (where this deal is), we actually produce a huge percentage of our electricity from renewables. In fact in a single day in August this year, the wind turbines alone produced more energy than the entire country consumed that day so with each passing year, "zero-emmisions" is certainly achievable.

ref: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/aug/11/scotland-completely-powered-by-wind-turbines-for-a-day
1 Like #23
s24adm
I'd say that's not great value tbh, my 2016 Fiat 500X (1.6 multijet) gets filled to the brim from empty on £45 of diesel and gets me at least 500miles per tank each time, it was £12k pre-registered from arnold clark, has oodles of boot space being an SUV. It's great to drive and very nippy in sport-mode when you need it. It's £0 tax in first year then £20 per year afterwards (Group B). I don't expect it to drop a huge amount when I trade it in in a year or so. If I was compromising for an electric or hybrid, I'd be expecting to at least double or triple my miles per £ to make it worthwhile switching.

Diesel has become a dirty word. Once upon a time it was the car to buy but not anymore.
1 Like #24
A new yaris hybrid on drive the deal is £14,200.

Which would then equate to £197.91 per month.
1 Like #25
bozzy
The most false thing about it is the zero emissions more than the economy.
Might not be any at the tail-pipe, but the coal fired power station that just charged it up just belched out the equivalent elsewhere. Some of it will be renewable, but it's just a bull$*£^# feelgood exercise.

Interesting point. Where did you source this information as I'd like to have a read of this during my lunch break
3 Likes #26
ollie87
bseal1947
And still using a polluting energy source to charge them up
Someone doesn't understand the efficiencies of scale. Nor the advantage of not pushing emissions out of the tailpipe in already polluted cities.
bozzy
Might not be any at the tail-pipe, but the coal fired power station that just charged it up just belched out the equivalent elsewhere. Some of it will be renewable, but it's just a bull$*£^# feelgood exercise.
Oh look, another one.

You beat me to it. A power station is massively more efficient than a car engine burning petrol for itself...

Added in with this, as has been mentioned, at least some of the energy for electric cars comes from renewable from the grid... And the potential is there for much more.

And a massive plus is they aren't spewing dirty fumes all through town centres! I hate walking past busses and getting a body full of exhaust fumes. Plus electric cars are far quieter meaning less noise polution and not to mention that they are much more comfortable to drive.
3 Likes #27
When a car overtakes me on my bike I’m always glad if isn’t a desiesel and I don’t have to breathe in their poison. If the car is electric I’m even more pleased.

Heat from me on behalf of all the cyclists that feel the same.:D
1 Like #28
interest free loan to buy a car is always welcome..even
better if its electric. no more polution in our cities..
#29
Gerry876
A new yaris hybrid on drive the deal is £14,200.
Which would then equate to £197.91 per month.

I wasn't aware Toyota did a PHEV version of the Yaris. Only a normal hybrid which doesn't qualify for the loan.
#30
s24adm
papasb
[Fast depreciation]
We have had a plug-in Prius for four years. If we don't sell it then we don't have this issue. When I bought it I decided I was going to run it until it died.
It is so damn cheap to run. £37 fill gets you 600 miles out of a tank. And it's a pretty good size inside. Boot isn't the best, but fine for a small family week away (just!). Zero car tax helps as well.
I agree high outlay. But if you intend to keep it for the long run, then they are cheap to run on a daily basis and the financial 'hit' becomes very small if at all.
I'd say that's not great value tbh, my 2016 Fiat 500X (1.6 multijet) gets filled to the brim from empty on £45 of diesel and gets me at least 500miles per tank each time, it was £12k pre-registered from arnold clark, has oodles of boot space being an SUV. It's great to drive and very nippy in sport-mode when you need it. It's £0 tax in first year then £20 per year afterwards (Group B). I don't expect it to drop a huge amount when I trade it in in a year or so. If I was compromising for an electric or hybrid, I'd be expecting to at least double or triple my miles per £ to make it worthwhile switching.
I agree - I have three ageing "bargain basement" diesels (under £1000 to buy) and they'll do 400-650 miles on a £50 fill. If you're talking pure economy it's just not worth the outlay for a hybrid (unless you drive it 24/7). Obviously if I had the spare cash to spend on less polluting cars I might consider it but at present I'd rather be able to afford to pay to have a roof over my head.

Edited By: Aliwoo18 on Dec 16, 2016 11:53
#31
s24adm
bozzy
The most false thing about it is the zero emissions more than the economy.
Might not be any at the tail-pipe, but the coal fired power station that just charged it up just belched out the equivalent elsewhere. Some of it will be renewable, but it's just a bull$*£^# feelgood exercise.
Maybe down in Englandshire, but in Scotland (where this deal is), we actually produce a huge percentage of our electricity from renewables. In fact in a single day in August this year, the wind turbines alone produced more energy than the entire country consumed that day so with each passing year, "zero-emmisions" is certainly achievable.
ref: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/aug/11/scotland-completely-powered-by-wind-turbines-for-a-day

that easy to achieve with a population of only 5.2 million and more wind/storms than you can cope with!
down here in England its a different ball game pal in terms of demographics of people and consumption.
surely only allowing Scottish people to apply for this grant is again demonstrating the fact that you like to treat people south of Hadrian's wall differently!
23 Likes #32
mickgoodie
s24adm
bozzy
The most false thing about it is the zero emissions more than the economy.
Might not be any at the tail-pipe, but the coal fired power station that just charged it up just belched out the equivalent elsewhere. Some of it will be renewable, but it's just a bull$*£^# feelgood exercise.
Maybe down in Englandshire, but in Scotland (where this deal is), we actually produce a huge percentage of our electricity from renewables. In fact in a single day in August this year, the wind turbines alone produced more energy than the entire country consumed that day so with each passing year, "zero-emmisions" is certainly achievable.
ref: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/aug/11/scotland-completely-powered-by-wind-turbines-for-a-day
that easy to achieve with a population of only 5.2 million and more wind/storms than you can cope with!
down here in England its a different ball game pal in terms of demographics of people and consumption.
surely only allowing Scottish people to apply for this grant is again demonstrating the fact that you like to treat people south of Hadrian's wall differently!

The English...

Always hating what others have. Always blaming others for their problems...

The British government in Westminster have chosen not to offer these loans for the whole of the UK. It has also chosen to cut back on renewable energy investment in favour of new Nuclear deals. That has sod all to do with Scotland.

Edited By: satchef1 on Dec 16, 2016 13:06
2 Likes #33
bozzy
The most false thing about it is the zero emissions more than the economy.

Might not be any at the tail-pipe, but the coal fired power station that just charged it up just belched out the equivalent elsewhere. Some of it will be renewable, but it's just a bull$*£^# feelgood exercise.

It's perfectly possible to run an EV on green electricity. Just sign up to a green provider and only use Ecotricity's Electric Highway when out and about.
3 Likes #34
bseal1947
Oh yes the clean electric cars. Battery's built from open cast mining rare earth minerals. Thousands of miles of travel to assemble the batteries. And still using a polluting energy source to charge them up
What a pointless statement.

Name anything and there will be some pollution from it's production. The long term use of electric vehicles will reduce emissions - especially when established green energy resources are used to make the electricity - which is Scotland is over 30% of all energy production and still increasing.
#35
Great deal, I finally have enough to get that Porsche 918 to go with my McLaren P1
#36
Scottish drivers? Surely Scottish address??
#37
A current electric car will be worthless if not useless when paid off in over 6 years.
As for the 'new technology takes a while to get going' thing. Electric cars have been around at least ten years or so. they are still pretty awful and expensive with no proper network in place for charging.
1 Like #38
This is hardly a new deal been on the go for as long as I can remember.
2 Likes #39
@fireman1 - There are currently over 4,000 charging locations in the UK, which is around half the number of petrol stations. Given that for many people their electric car leaves home (and possibly work) fully charged every day anyway, how many do you need for it to be a 'proper' network?
5 Likes #40
Some of you people talk a load of rubbish based on media crap, Have owned a Leaf for 20 months and 24000 miles and a Zoe for 15 months and 10000 miles, traveled all over the country and with planning and have had no problems getting a charge. the electricity when charging at home costs me between 60 to 67p per day to do my daily 46 mile commute and when out and about its 99% free at destination chargers and 10.8p per kW at Chargemaster rapid chargers. it always brings a grin to my face when people rant on about how useless electric cars are, and I know smugley who the suckers are paying so much for there motoring.

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