SLx 1 Way Plug-In Aerial TV Booster Signal Amplifier - only £4.99 at Argos! - HotUKDeals
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SLx 1 Way Plug-In Aerial TV Booster Signal Amplifier - only £4.99 at Argos!

£4.99 @ Argos
RRP: £12.99 - Less than half price. Amplifies the signal to 1 TV. Plugs in to electrical wall socket to provide a sufficient boost of power to the original aerial. I now receive all Freeview HD… Read More
letslaughadam Avatar
10m, 3w agoFound 10 months, 3 weeks ago
RRP: £12.99 - Less than half price. Amplifies the signal to 1 TV.

Plugs in to electrical wall socket to provide a sufficient boost of power to the original aerial.

I now receive all Freeview HD channels in my room, thanks to this beauty!
More From Argos:

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Comments/page:
#1
wasn't aware something like this existed! brilliant, so does this mean a tv would need a wall socket aerial not an external wirey one?
#2
cb_scavenger
wasn't aware something like this existed! brilliant, so does this mean a tv would need a wall socket aerial not an external wirey one?

Hi,

Not at all, usually this device provides means for 'improving' or 'boosting' the signal that indoor TV aerials have. You would plug this into the wall/or extension lead and plug your usual antenna (TV indoor aerial) and then plug the booster to the TV coaxial socket.

Think of this device as 'turbo-charging' your indoor aerial to provide better quality and reception.
#3
Thanks OP
1 Like #4
With digital TV it's often the quality of the signal that counts not the quantity. If it's rubbish in the first place this may not help.
#5
col996s
With digital TV it's often the quality of the signal that counts not the quantity. If it's rubbish in the first place this may not help.

It would be interesting to get some feedback from people who have used this to let us know if it does make a improvement to their reception.
1 Like #6
youchoose
col996s
With digital TV it's often the quality of the signal that counts not the quantity. If it's rubbish in the first place this may not help.
It would be interesting to get some feedback from people who have used this to let us know if it does make a improvement to their reception.
I've used a similar product before for a digital signal, and they do work. You just have to be realistic about what it can do with what's already a poor signal. I had a few channels that would jump in and out occasionally, and a booster *just* made it tolerable. I went from losing the signal every 10 seconds to slight hiccups every few minutes. People have had success with getting channels they couldn't receive at all before, but I wouldn't count on it working consistently.
3 Likes #7
I've been through a number of boosters like this and they were all quite poor. You're boosting an already bad signal, along with the errors and noise in the stream.

You need to put a 'masthead amplifier' close to the aerial and ensure you have good quality coax. High quality coax makes a huge difference alone.

Loads of good reading at: http://www.aerialsandtv.com/loftaerials.html#AmplifiersAndSplitters
#8
Lol @ TV ariel. 1999 called they want their technology back.
#9
nomnomnomnom
I've been through a number of boosters like this and they were all quite poor. You're boosting an already bad signal, along with the errors and noise in the stream.
You need to put a 'masthead amplifier' close to the aerial and ensure you have good quality coax. High quality coax makes a huge difference alone.
Loads of good reading at: http://www.aerialsandtv.com/loftaerials.html#AmplifiersAndSplitters

I've got a booster like this and it does the job for me, but it doesn't work for everybody. The £5 Argos amplifier might be good enough for a lot of people and it's easy to fit and try out. For a masthead amplifier there's several reasonably priced ones at Screwfix and Amazon, but you will need a power socket close to the mast, so you are probably going to be fiddling about in the loft. For 5 quid the booster is worth trying first.
1 Like #10
Mandroid578
Lol @ TV ariel. 1999 called they want their technology back.

If your broadband speeds are crap because you don't live in a big town you're still going to need an aerial.
Blame BT, not lack of tech awareness.

BTW - Lol @ 2016 technology - apparently still can't auto-correct "TV ariel" to "TV aerial"! :p
1 Like #11
Spod
nomnomnomnom
I've been through a number of boosters like this and they were all quite poor. You're boosting an already bad signal, along with the errors and noise in the stream.
You need to put a 'masthead amplifier' close to the aerial and ensure you have good quality coax. High quality coax makes a huge difference alone.
Loads of good reading at: http://www.aerialsandtv.com/loftaerials.html#AmplifiersAndSplitters
I've got a booster like this and it does the job for me, but it doesn't work for everybody. The £5 Argos amplifier might be good enough for a lot of people and it's easy to fit and try out. For a masthead amplifier there's several reasonably priced ones at Screwfix and Amazon, but you will need a power socket close to the mast, so you are probably going to be fiddling about in the loft. For 5 quid the booster is worth trying first.

I don't disagree with what you're saying, but it's highly situational with digital. I've just not had much success myself. Even the devices react differently to poor signals, so it's very hard to make a solid recommendation to anyone (other than a mast head, which will always solve the issue if you can get the signal in the first place). But for 5 quid, it's worth a shot. You can also return easily to Argos if it doesn't work!

On the power front though: Not quite. You can get mastheads you can power through the coax cable. See the link I posted above for an example in one of the images. It means even with no power in the loft, it's trivial to install one :3


Edited By: nomnomnomnom on Aug 24, 2016 12:42
#12
I've got a plug in booster from Amazon and it makes the difference between being able to receive HD channels or not in a bedroom. Worth a try.
#13
Ever since we got our new TV years back the Freeview HD channels have been awkward. Often the screen will go blank for a moment then work, then blank for a moment again. The signal strength icon seems to suggest the signal is OK. Could this be due to insufficient signal strength (comparable to bandwith?) not carrying the full HD info. The picture never goes grainy/pixelated or anything, just there or nothing.
1 Like #14
Good spot OP.

Much prefer analogue than digital as this new 21st century technology is so intermittent in quality despite spending £320 on an aerial and master head booster it's still run bush, whereas analogue was spot on most of the time.

B
5 Likes #15
Meathotukdeals
Ever since we got our new TV years back the Freeview HD channels have been awkward. Often the screen will go blank for a moment then work, then blank for a moment again. The signal strength icon seems to suggest the signal is OK. Could this be due to insufficient signal strength (comparable to bandwith?) not carrying the full HD info. The picture never goes grainy/pixelated or anything, just there or nothing.

It's really difficult to say, as different devices act very differently. Some will 'break up' the image, some will black screen, some will tell you there is a signal problem, some will say 'no lock'...it's just impossible to say. Signal indicators rarely mean anything on their own, as you don't really know what value / formula it is using to say the signal is fine.

If you have a high end PC tuner, you can normally examine the transport stream and see what the issue is exactly. These are expensive though and not really a way to troubleshoot.

You can buy a signal meter from ebay for a few quid, but these are normally 'all or nothing' devices, and little drop outs rarely get picked up on them.

It's interesting that you mention it was a few years ago, as this could coincide with the 4G turn on, depending on your area: https://ukfree.tv/maps/4g
4G has caused some issues for TV signals: http://www.techradar.com/news/phone-and-communications/mobile-phones/4g-could-ruin-your-tv-here-s-what-will-save-it-1199804

By far the cheapest way, and least hassle is to renew the equipment. Namely the TV aerial and the coax cable.

The correct coax is really important. If you have older stuff installed, it will have issues with the latest signals. See this for a breakdown and explanation: http://www.satcure.co.uk/tech/cable.htm

Any decent aerial will do. Screwfix and the usual places will have an offer on no doubt.

If you want to 'split' the cable to go to more than one device, you should absolutely invest in a 'mast head' amplifier where your aerial is installed.

Finally, make sure your entire cable run uses F-connectors: http://www.screwfix.com/c/electrical-lighting/lead-connectors/cat830560
EVERY end of the cable should have an F-connector on it, which you can then plug into the correct coupling plug, if one is needed. For example:
On each end of the cable: http://www.screwfix.com/p/f-connector-for-sky-cable-pack-of-10/98173
Need to join 2 together: http://www.screwfix.com/p/labgear-f-plug-to-f-plugs-pack-of-10/95730
Need to use it on a TV with only a 'pin' connector, use these on the end: http://www.screwfix.com/p/labgear-f-to-coax-plugs-pack-of-10/39772
A lot of recent equipment just accepts the F-connector directly. All satellite equipment should by default.

Making a cable is very easy. See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zNqJcmslwyM
You don't need to buy any equipment if you have some pliers around. Although some copper grease is good to put on the cable where the thread will screw onto to make your life easier :3

There are other options, like compression connectors, but you really don't need them for the home.

Hope that helps a bit.

Edited By: nomnomnomnom on Aug 24, 2016 14:13: more info
#16
Sky Digiboxes and the Sky Plus Boxes have built in aerial amplifiers and if you use a magic eye you can get a boosted TV Signal in another room
#17
Cold because this isn't likely to improve anything. Why would what is in this box work better than what is inside your TV?

The problem is not just the 'size' of the signal but also the size of the noise and boosters boost both and add some more noise of their own. If not well designed they can also be badly affected by other strong radio signals.

I have a 'signal booster'. It is in the loft where it minimizes loss in the antenna cable and provides enough output to split and feed cables to two rooms.
#18
my Tv & YouView box are at the other end of the room to the aerial socket which is a bit of a pain. Its a shame there's nothing to send the signal over the power sockets or other wireless device.
#19
nomnomnomnom
Meathotukdeals
Ever since we got our new TV years back the Freeview HD channels have been awkward. Often the screen will go blank for a moment then work, then blank for a moment again. The signal strength icon seems to suggest the signal is OK. Could this be due to insufficient signal strength (comparable to bandwith?) not carrying the full HD info. The picture never goes grainy/pixelated or anything, just there or nothing.
It's really difficult to say, as different devices act very differently. Some will 'break up' the image, some will black screen, some will tell you there is a signal problem, some will say 'no lock'...it's just impossible to say. Signal indicators rarely mean anything on their own, as you don't really know what value / formula it is using to say the signal is fine.
If you have a high end PC tuner, you can normally examine the transport stream and see what the issue is exactly. These are expensive though and not really a way to troubleshoot.
You can buy a signal meter from ebay for a few quid, but these are normally 'all or nothing' devices, and little drop outs rarely get picked up on them.
It's interesting that you mention it was a few years ago, as this could coincide with the 4G turn on, depending on your area: https://ukfree.tv/maps/4g
4G has caused some issues for TV signals: http://www.techradar.com/news/phone-and-communications/mobile-phones/4g-could-ruin-your-tv-here-s-what-will-save-it-1199804
By far the cheapest way, and least hassle is to renew the equipment. Namely the TV aerial and the coax cable.
The correct coax is really important. If you have older stuff installed, it will have issues with the latest signals. See this for a breakdown and explanation: http://www.satcure.co.uk/tech/cable.htm
Any decent aerial will do. Screwfix and the usual places will have an offer on no doubt.
If you want to 'split' the cable to go to more than one device, you should absolutely invest in a 'mast head' amplifier where your aerial is installed.
Finally, make sure your entire cable run uses F-connectors: http://www.screwfix.com/c/electrical-lighting/lead-connectors/cat830560
EVERY end of the cable should have an F-connector on it, which you can then plug into the correct coupling plug, if one is needed. For example:
On each end of the cable: http://www.screwfix.com/p/f-connector-for-sky-cable-pack-of-10/98173
Need to join 2 together: http://www.screwfix.com/p/labgear-f-plug-to-f-plugs-pack-of-10/95730
Need to use it on a TV with only a 'pin' connector, use these on the end: http://www.screwfix.com/p/labgear-f-to-coax-plugs-pack-of-10/39772
A lot of recent equipment just accepts the F-connector directly. All satellite equipment should by default.
Making a cable is very easy. See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zNqJcmslwyM
You don't need to buy any equipment if you have some pliers around. Although some copper grease is good to put on the cable where the thread will screw onto to make your life easier :3
There are other options, like compression connectors, but you really don't need them for the home.
Hope that helps a bit.

Zounds! Thanks for all this info! Really thanks for taking the time. Turns out (I didn't know they were called F-connectors) I have experience with these from my old free to air Eurosport days. Just going to bookmark your post as I'll have to keep returning to it as I get through the links. Thanks again.

Afterthought. Can this be true? A guy who fitted aerials as his job said our tv could be like this because the signal could be too strong?


Edited By: Meathotukdeals on Aug 24, 2016 18:37: question
#20
Solly92
Cold because this isn't likely to improve anything. Why would what is in this box work better than what is inside your TV?

Solly92
I have a 'signal booster'. It is in the loft where it minimizes loss in the antenna cable and provides enough output to split and feed cables to two rooms.

So you use a signal booster, but can't understand why a booster would work better than what is inside your TV?

It's essentially the same thing, except you are amplifying the signal at the aerial rather than at the TV socket! The only difference is the potential of noise generated within the co-ax cable between the aerial and the TV, which would be amplified by the Argos booster.

Solly92
The problem is not just the 'size' of the signal but also the size of the noise and boosters boost both and add some more noise of their own. If not well designed they can also be badly affected by other strong radio signals.

A digital tuner has a critical "threshold". If the signal is below this level, the tuner will not "see" it. So an amplifier might help if you can boost the signal above that threshold. Yes, you are also boosting the noise, which might reduce the effect of the amplification if the noise is bad, but if your co-ax cable is good and there isn't excessive radio interference it might just be good enough. Of course, it is most likely to work if you were close to the threshold anyway. And if you can get above the threshold the picture should be perfect. It's not like an analogue signal where noise makes the picture fuzzy.

Yes, putting a booster by the aerial is a better solution, but it doesn't mean that this won't work for anybody. I've found these sorts of boxes to be very effective where I live and at 5 quid it's worth a try if you've got signal problems - especially as you can return it if it doesn't work.
1 Like #21
cheers op and other contributors above, lots of useful information :)
#22
Meathotukdeals

Afterthought. Can this be true? A guy who fitted aerials as his job said our tv could be like this because the signal could be too strong?

Yes, he's absolutely right....but it's only normally an issue for people who are close to the transmitter and use high gain aerials. Have a look online and find out the distance to yours. There is no 'range' where you can simply say that you'll have a strong signal though, as there are too many factors involved (transmit power, your aerial, cables, device, weather and so on), but if you find you're within a couple of KM and show the symptoms (check the link below) then it's worth testing for.

Here is some more info on it: https://ukfree.tv/article/1107051892/Freeview_signals_too_much_of_a_good_thing_is_bad_f
Funnily enough, that link has this exact booster in it and warns people of the lack of results with boosters like that :3

The short version is that your signal strength should be about 75%, with the quality as high as possible.

It's easy to test, just grab a 'adjustable attenuator' like this: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Aerial-Coaxial-Cable-Variable-Attenuator/dp/B007A0S8L6

Loads of places will sell one, that's just the first I found through a quick search that has good reviews. Get a variable one, not a fixed one. That way you can adjust it and see if it improves or not.



Edited By: nomnomnomnom on Aug 24, 2016 23:09
#23
Spod
So you use a signal booster, but can't understand why a booster would work better than what is inside your TV?

It works better because it is in the loft. Cables do not generate noise they attenuate the signal (lose about 1/2 the signal in 100ft of cable). The smaller signal makes the noise from the amplifier more significant and having more signal than noise is what is important not how big the signal is.
#24
nomnomnomnom
Meathotukdeals

Afterthought. Can this be true? A guy who fitted aerials as his job said our tv could be like this because the signal could be too strong?
Yes, he's absolutely right....but it's only normally an issue for people who are close to the transmitter and use high gain aerials. Have a look online and find out the distance to yours. There is no 'range' where you can simply say that you'll have a strong signal though, as there are too many factors involved (transmit power, your aerial, cables, device, weather and so on), but if you find you're within a couple of KM and show the symptoms (check the link below) then it's worth testing for.
Here is some more info on it: https://ukfree.tv/article/1107051892/Freeview_signals_too_much_of_a_good_thing_is_bad_f
Funnily enough, that link has this exact booster in it and warns people of the lack of results with boosters like that :3
The short version is that your signal strength should be about 75%, with the quality as high as possible.
It's easy to test, just grab a 'adjustable attenuator' like this: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Aerial-Coaxial-Cable-Variable-Attenuator/dp/B007A0S8L6
Loads of places will sell one, that's just the first I found through a quick search that has good reviews. Get a variable one, not a fixed one. That way you can adjust it and see if it improves or not.

Bit boozy again! Thanks again. Now that brought back memories! I bought one variable and I think one fixed 10db . I can't remember what happened with the 10db - likely not much as I'd have remembered if it acted. The variable one did nothing either - but it was cheap.

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