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Solar PV Installation - £6,495.00 @ cleanerairsolutions

KelvynKelvyn

supply, design and install a 1.40kWp Solar PV electricity generation system onto the roof of your house from £6495 Inc VAT (subject to full site survey and dependant on location) for the months of June and July (2010).


I've been looking into this and prices I've been quoted elsewhere was around £8-£9k, with the new feed in tarriff i'm very tempted, anyone else seen a better deal for me?

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All Comments (25)

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1
    TarquinLeRoi
    all that tech and money that will probably end up each day generating just about enough energy to boil a cup of tea.

    and they're damn ugly
    sagemagoo
    TarquinLeRoi
    all that tech and money that will probably end up each day generating just about enough energy to boil a cup of tea.

    and they're damn ugly


    Baby steps - we'll get there one day.......
    BigAde
    Isn't the payback period for these PV cells something like 10-20 years?
    nbuuifx
    As you say with the new tarrif where they pay double for electric you send back it could be worth it.

    1.4kw seems a bit low though - I think the average house uses 15kw per day so you would need more than 10 hours of direct sunlight giving maximum output just to cover your own use.

    I guess though if in the day you are using barely any whilst at work and the electric company is buying it off you at the premium rate, then you buy it back at half the premium rate you would still end up better off.

    Not voted yet as I'm not sure on the value - will wait to see what other info people bring
    Jefft
    nbuuifx;8945270
    As you say with the new tarrif where they pay double for electric you send back it could be worth it.

    1.4kw seems a bit low though - I think the average house uses 15kw per day so you would need more than 10 hours of direct sunlight giving maximum output just to cover your own use.

    I guess though if in the day you are using barely any whilst at work and the electric company is buying it off you at the premium rate, then you buy it back at half the premium rate you would still end up better off.

    Not voted yet as I'm not sure on the value - will wait to see what other info people bring

    1.4kW is low the usual household installation is 2-2.4kW.
    I am not sure why you think the electricity company will pay you double for exported electricity. I suggest you do a search on "Feed in Tariff" for the facts.
    DADOF7
    its not if it makes money its if its cheaper than others...
    voted hot.:thumbsup:
    mas99
    Waaaay too much.

    If you want it on the cheap then look at someone like ashadegreener - they install on your roof for free and let you have the electric while they take the FiT.

    Other wise check out navitron.org.uk for MCS approved equipment and suppliers at sensible prices.

    In general you are better putting the money into insulation and improving your house efficiency rather than PV.

    To go PV you either need to already have a very efficient house or to expect to make a profit from the FiT.
    Krinkle
    sagemagoo
    Baby steps - we'll get there one day.......


    ...these have been around for years now though and don't seem to have progressed one jot. They're still butt ugly on your roof, still very low powered and still very expensive...it'll take you years to make your initial outlay back. This technology is either being hampered by the 'other' energy suppliers behind the scenes or it doesn't work quite so well as the glossy brochures would have you believe!!!

    ...harnessing the power of the sun to supply you with FREE power...never going to happen until someone figures out a way to charge us for it...shame eh! :(
    tek-monkey
    nbuuifx
    1.4kw seems a bit low though - I think the average house uses 15kw per day so you would need more than 10 hours of direct sunlight giving maximum output just to cover your own use.


    I wish, mines more like 35kw :(
    pet2000
    I'm just starting to look into these solar panel schemes. So far my calculations show that they are complete rubbish and money making scams (for the supplier, not the user). Hope this one is different. Be careful before you part with your dough.
    Kelvyn
    I have been keeping track (via a npower energy meter) and average over the last three months at 5kWh a day, will look at a shadegreener - but how can they do it free? no such thing as a free meal ?

    EDIT- a shade greener don't cover my area.
    nearyj2003@yahoo
    This appears to be a purely commercial venture where the electricity is produced and immediately used and if there is an overcast day or in the early morning/evening there is very little power produced and then the payback and reliability is non-existent.
    Most systems in use around the world are made up of panels then a DC charge controller, storage batteries usually 12v deep cycle, and then a DC/AC inverter that is only limited in output by the amount of batteries used, this system allows for electicity to be produced and stored and then used as required and can be gradually added too over time but the payback takes years, on the system in the post with the type of weather in the UK you will never see it pay for itself
    ChristianS
    may look alright on a council estate...but then again someone will probably nick them :-D
    Hideous looking - no chance.
    nearyj2003@yahoo
    Krinkle
    ...these have been around for years now though and don't seem to have progressed one jot. They're still butt ugly on your roof, still very low powered and still very expensive...it'll take you years to make your initial outlay back. This technology is either being hampered by the 'other' energy suppliers behind the scenes or it doesn't work quite so well as the glossy brochures would have you believe!!!

    ...harnessing the power of the sun to supply you with FREE power...never going to happen until someone figures out a way to charge us for it...shame eh! :(


    Futher to your point above I was involved in this stuff years ago and then the biggest player and patent holder in the market was BP SOLAR (as in British petroleum) and from what I have seen the efficiency and design havn't changed as its not in their interests to supply free efficient power
    csiman
    pet2000;8945590
    I'm just starting to look into these solar panel schemes. So far my calculations show that they are complete rubbish and money making scams (for the supplier, not the user). Hope this one is different. Be careful before you part with your dough.

    +1

    20 years just to get your money back and thats excluding maintenance costs and what £6500 would have got you earning interest

    way too much at the moment for this tech.
    mas99
    Kelvyn
    I have been keeping track (via a npower energy meter) and average over the last three months at 5kWh a day, will look at a shadegreener - but [B]how can they do it free? no such thing as a free meal ?[/B]

    EDIT- a shade greener don't cover my area.


    Quite right, and I was sceptical when I first heard of them. You need to be in their area and have a good site.

    Basically the new FIT scheme is throwing money at solar - they take the money and you take the power. The fact that they can do that tells you everything about the pricing of so many of the solar installations. If you have the cash available then you are better to pay for your own and get both the power and the money.

    Its much the same reason why all these wind turbines are going up everywhere - the argument for them from a sensible green/efficiency point of view isn't great, but governmetn subsidies make them a sensible option from a financial point of view. I'd repeat my point about insulation (external is good) and efficiency if you actually want to be green and save money.
    dubnuts
    I was chatting with a tech guy from a company that prints the solar panel material. The sheets that are used to make the panels. They are printed like circuit boards and use some pretty nasty chemicals.

    He said that the printing uses a lot of energy, more than they can generate in the lifetime of the panel. So you have to factor that in to the equation if you're trying to be green!!

    He also said that they are busier than ever, go figure.
    Jefft
    pet2000;8945590
    I'm just starting to look into these solar panel schemes. So far my calculations show that they are complete rubbish and money making scams (for the supplier, not the user). Hope this one is different. Be careful before you part with your dough.

    I would be interested to see your calculations. Would you please post them?:thumbsup:
    Jefft
    dubnuts;8947225
    I was chatting with a tech guy from a company that prints the solar panel material. The sheets that are used to make the panels. They are printed like circuit boards and use some pretty nasty chemicals.

    He said that the printing uses a lot of energy, more than they can generate in the lifetime of the panel. So you have to factor that in to the equation if you're trying to be green!!

    .

    In a 20 year period a single 125W panel should produce 6300kW. Are you saying that the manufacture of a panel consumes 6300kW?
    Kelvyn
    Sorry just had a chuckel - Jefft - you are classed as a solar flare, and this is a solar pv post! :)

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