SOLDERING SET FOR THE ELECTRONICS HOBBYIST £6.89 delivered @ Amazon - HotUKDeals
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SOLDERING SET FOR THE ELECTRONICS HOBBYIST £6.89 delivered @ Amazon

£6.89 @ Amazon
Items Fulfilled by Amazon. are allowed on HUKD # Electronic 30W (230V) soldering iron # Insulated soldering stand with cleaning sponge # Solder # Desoldering pump # Blister packed
MikeT Avatar
[mod] 6y, 10m agoFound 6 years, 10 months ago
Items Fulfilled by Amazon. are allowed on HUKD

# Electronic 30W (230V) soldering iron
# Insulated soldering stand with cleaning sponge
# Solder
# Desoldering pump
# Blister packed
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[mod]#1
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41Lzko7-TTL._AA300_.jpg
#2
isnt this a pretty much normal price?
#3
Cheapest equivalent set on auction site was £7.79 with over 2,200 sold.

90p saving, HOT!
3 Likes #4
Nice little set but it is a bit to over powered. 30W is OK for soldering wires together and large things like switches but is far to hot for soldering delicate things like transistors.

If you think you are going to want to get into a bit of electronic kit building then an adjustable iron is the way to go. I used to use a 17W iron for detailed work and a 25W for larger things but it became a bit of a pain having to swap irons so an adjustable one makes life so much easier.
1 Like #5
Good find - I purchased this exact set from Satcure for a fair bit more. Has helped me repair a few Thompson Sky HD boxes for friends and family :thumbsup:
#6
Going_Digital
Nice little set but it is a bit to over powered. 30W is OK for soldering wires together and large things like switches but is far to hot for soldering delicate things like transistors.

If you think you are going to want to get into a bit of electronic kit building then an adjustable iron is the way to go. I used to use a 17W iron for detailed work and a 25W for larger things but it became a bit of a pain having to swap irons so an adjustable one makes life so much easier.


Great advice! Thanks for that...
#7
Going_Digital
Nice little set but it is a bit to over powered. 30W is OK for soldering wires together and large things like switches but is far to hot for soldering delicate things like transistors.

If you think you are going to want to get into a bit of electronic kit building then an adjustable iron is the way to go. I used to use a 17W iron for detailed work and a 25W for larger things but it became a bit of a pain having to swap irons so an adjustable one makes life so much easier.


Thx for the Info bud, rep added.
#8
Good find. Just what I've been after for that odd job around the house!
suspended#9
as you guys seem to know about soldering irons, can you recommend one for soldering together a very fine silver chain, my bracelet has broken, its too fine to mend in the usual way and the only way i can think is by soldering it, but any advice, nice advice please would be welcomed, thanks
#10
temperature adjustable soldering irons are about £15 on ebay, i highly suggest getting one rather than one of these
#11
gdwelsh
Cheapest equivalent set on auction site was £7.79 with over 2,200 sold.

90p saving, HOT!


If that's the definition of hot, then I guess.

I bet you could find a trillion things that are 90p cheaper somewhere than anywhere else.

This isn't hot. Until it's turned on. :whistling:.
#12
jasmin49
as you guys seem to know about soldering irons, can you recommend one for soldering together a very fine silver chain, my bracelet has broken, its too fine to mend in the usual way and the only way i can think is by soldering it, but any advice, nice advice please would be welcomed, thanks


I don't know much about jewellery but I would imagine that you would need to use a silver solder rather than the the tin alloy solders used in electronics. Silver solder probably needs quite a high temperature. Seeing as how it is just a one off I think you are probably better going to a small independent jeweller to get it repaired otherwise you are going to have to buy an iron and some silver solder that probably won't get used again.
#13
avarty
temperature adjustable soldering irons are about £15 on ebay, i highly suggest getting one rather than one of these



Thanks will take a look!
#14
Thanks. :D
#15
you can get nice electric ones now for soldiering delicate things, they work a treat
#16
jasmin49
as you guys seem to know about soldering irons, can you recommend one for soldering together a very fine silver chain, my bracelet has broken, its too fine to mend in the usual way and the only way i can think is by soldering it, but any advice, nice advice please would be welcomed, thanks


Simple advice: Don't try it yourself

In addition to Going_Digitals post:

There's an real art to soldering that takes a fair amount of practice to learn. if you haven't tried it before, you'll make a complete monkeys breakfast of it - and in this case, make a mess of your chain.
Best bet is to take it to a good independent jeweller (not the High Street chains), and have them do it. It'll cost you a bit more than doing it yourself, but they'll do a good job. Chances are you wont be able to see the join :thumbsup:
#17
Its not so much the wattage/heat that damages transistors/integrated-circuits, its the leakage current. Cheap soldering irons leak current through the tip, the ones suitable for soldering modern components or working on modding consoles etc tend to cost a bit more (look for Antex etc). This will still be fine for general electric work, just be careful if attempting electronics work with it!

To solder silver - don't use standard solder, use a solder with a high silver content, as said above its probably best getting a jeweller to do it if you haven't got experience in it.

This deal is still pretty good though, considering it has a stand and a desolder pump included.
suspended#18
thanks for all the advice, its not an expensive bracelet, its more sentimental value, and youre right its going to look awful if i try to do it myself so i will phone round some independant jewellers and see if they will fix it. Glad I asked as you guys always come up with good advice.
#19
I'd suggest a cordless one. I bought a Draper butane powered soldering iron for around a tenner and havent looked back. These are all good when youm have to do something and its on a bench but if you have to solder something in your car or in a tight space you have to trail a cumbersome lead behind you. The butane ones come on like a ciggy lighter and heat up quickly.
#20
I bought one of these kits a few years ago, it all looks the same except they've changed some colours of the items. Last thing I went to solder I gave up as it took ages just to do a single LED, I went and bought an 25w antex one off ebay and it was x10 as good.

The stand, solder and pump are useful though.
2 Likes #21
jah128
Its not so much the wattage/heat that damages transistors/integrated-circuits, its the leakage current.


Heat will damage a semiconductor junction quite easily!

There's a whole load of confusion in this thread so let's just clear a few things up:

Standard electronic solder melts at just below 200 degrees celsius so an iron needs to be a little hotter than that, around 350 degrees is about right.

The wattage of the iron does not define the tip temperature.

Larger wattage irons are able to get hotter quicker. When using the iron the tip cools as it touches metal or heats solder, so larger wattage irons are able to get hot again quicker. Small irons are only useful for soldering really fine stuff; if you try and use them on large contacts, heavy gauge wire etc they will cool so rapidly the solder will stop flowing.

Budget irons don't have temperature control. They just get hot. That's it. So generally they run a bit too hot when they are just sitting idle. If you want to do a lot of soldering you need a temperature controlled iron. If you are just doing the odd bits and pieces a budget iron will be fine but it's actually easier to mess things up with a cheap iron because it may be too hot, particularly for electronic components.

As with all craft skills practice is important. So have a play soldering scraps of wire etc before moving on to something important.

The technique for soldering an electronic joint is a simple sequence. Where people go wrong is that they dab both the iron and the solder on and off the joint at the wrong time and make a right mess of it. So the sequence is:

1. Ensure the items to be soldered are clean. Scrape oxidisation off metal surfaces to expose shiny metal.
2. Bring iron to the joint and keep it there so that surfaces are hot enough to allow a smooth flow of solder
3. Bring solder to the joint and allow it to flow
4. Remove solder from joint
5. Remove iron from joint.

On a small component this whole sequence may just be a couple of seconds, and on a larger joint it may be 5-10 seconds, but it’s always the same sequence:
Iron on
Solder on
Solder off
Iron off

Don’t put solder on the hot iron and then bring the iron, with a dollop of solder on it, to the joint. That smoke you see is the flux burning off. By the time the solder gets to the joint there will be no flux left to make a clean joint.

As for protecting sensitive components use a heatsink: get a pair or long nose pliers and wrap an elastic band round the handles so they stay clamped shut. Then clip pliers on to the transistor leg, or whatever, between the joint and the component. When you solder the joint a significant amount of the heat transfers to the pliers thereby protecting the component from excessive heat.

And finally…. It looks like a good deal to me if you want a kit to do the occasional bit of soldering work. Thanks OP!
#22
Going_Digital
Nice little set but it is a bit to over powered. 30W is OK for soldering wires together and large things like switches but is far to hot for soldering delicate things like transistors.

If you think you are going to want to get into a bit of electronic kit building then an adjustable iron is the way to go. I used to use a 17W iron for detailed work and a 25W for larger things but it became a bit of a pain having to swap irons so an adjustable one makes life so much easier.


Quite agree - 15W is plenty.
Have always used Antex irons - try the K582470 kit (includes 18W iron, stand, sponge, and some solder) or a C15 (15W). Only about 10 quid more but tried and tested!

http://cpc.farnell.com/1/1/30377-antex-soldering-kit-k582470-antex.html

Looking after your tip helps it's life too - regular wiping and tinning, especially as you turn off!
#23
far too much wattage for beginner electronics hobbyist which is unfortunately the target audience !

if you're going to buy this, get a decent ANTEX UK soldering iron 15-18w :thumbsup:
#24
i want a cheap soldering iron to fix a DT project (with flashing LEDs) i did in high school (yes its old, but one of the few pieces i proud of)...its just some wires i need to solder back on- namely the battery wire...should i look elsewhere then?
#25
bigsky

The technique for soldering an electronic joint is a simple sequence. Where people go wrong is that they dab both the iron and the solder on and off the joint at the wrong time and make a right mess of it. So the sequence is:

1. Ensure the items to be soldered are clean. Scrape oxidisation off metal surfaces to expose shiny metal.
2. Bring iron to the joint and keep it there so that surfaces are hot enough to allow a smooth flow of solder
3. Bring solder to the joint and allow it to flow
4. Remove solder from joint
5. Remove iron from joint.

On a small component this whole sequence may just be a couple of seconds, and on a larger joint it may be 5-10 seconds, but it’s always the same sequence:
Iron on
Solder on
Solder off
Iron off

Don’t put solder on the hot iron and then bring the iron, with a dollop of solder on it, to the joint. That smoke you see is the flux burning off. By the time the solder gets to the joint there will be no flux left to make a clean joint.

As for protecting sensitive components use a heatsink: get a pair or long nose pliers and wrap an elastic band round the handles so they stay clamped shut. Then clip pliers on to the transistor leg, or whatever, between the joint and the component. When you solder the joint a significant amount of the heat transfers to the pliers thereby protecting the component from excessive heat.

And finally…. It looks like a good deal to me if you want a kit to do the occasional bit of soldering work. Thanks OP!


Some good advice about how to solder, don't ever try to use the iron to put the solder on but you must keep the tip tinned. The tip of the iron must have a tiny coating of solder on it for the solder to flow properly when the solder is introduced to the joint.

The wattage of the iron does relate to the heat as the iron continually consumes that wattage of power and converts it to heat. As a result you will quickly destroy something like an LED if you hold the iron in place for to long.
#26
bigsky
Heat will damage a semiconductor junction quite easily!

There's a whole load of confusion in this thread so let's just clear a few things up:

Standard electronic solder melts at just below 200 degrees celsius so an iron needs to be a little hotter than that, around 350 degrees is about right.

The wattage of the iron does not define the tip temperature.

Larger wattage irons are able to get hotter quicker. When using the iron the tip cools as it touches metal or heats solder, so larger wattage irons are able to get hot again quicker. Small irons are only useful for soldering really fine stuff; if you try and use them on large contacts, heavy gauge wire etc they will cool so rapidly the solder will stop flowing.

Budget irons don't have temperature control. They just get hot. That's it. So generally they run a bit too hot when they are just sitting idle. If you want to do a lot of soldering you need a temperature controlled iron. If you are just doing the odd bits and pieces a budget iron will be fine but it's actually easier to mess things up with a cheap iron because it may be too hot, particularly for electronic components.

As with all craft skills practice is important. So have a play soldering scraps of wire etc before moving on to something important.

The technique for soldering an electronic joint is a simple sequence. Where people go wrong is that they dab both the iron and the solder on and off the joint at the wrong time and make a right mess of it. So the sequence is:

1. Ensure the items to be soldered are clean. Scrape oxidisation off metal surfaces to expose shiny metal.
2. Bring iron to the joint and keep it there so that surfaces are hot enough to allow a smooth flow of solder
3. Bring solder to the joint and allow it to flow
4. Remove solder from joint
5. Remove iron from joint.

On a small component this whole sequence may just be a couple of seconds, and on a larger joint it may be 5-10 seconds, but it’s always the same sequence:
Iron on
Solder on
Solder off
Iron off

Don’t put solder on the hot iron and then bring the iron, with a dollop of solder on it, to the joint. That smoke you see is the flux burning off. By the time the solder gets to the joint there will be no flux left to make a clean joint.

As for protecting sensitive components use a heatsink: get a pair or long nose pliers and wrap an elastic band round the handles so they stay clamped shut. Then clip pliers on to the transistor leg, or whatever, between the joint and the component. When you solder the joint a significant amount of the heat transfers to the pliers thereby protecting the component from excessive heat.

And finally…. It looks like a good deal to me if you want a kit to do the occasional bit of soldering work. Thanks OP!


thanks for that - have some rep :thumbsup:
#27
bingowings85
far too much wattage for beginner electronics hobbyist which is unfortunately the target audience !

if you're going to buy this, get a decent ANTEX UK soldering iron 15-18w :thumbsup:


Agreed, if a fixed wattage iron is to be used then a lower wattage would be better for electronics use and ANTEX make some of the best irons. I used an ANTEX 17W as my main iron for many years, excellent iron, until I decided to upgrade to a temperature controlled version.

The Iron here would be good desoldering and things like soldering joins on your car wiring as the constant supply of heat is needed due to the heat dissipation of the items you are trying to solder. An iron that is underpowered will do more damage than good as you would be holding the iron on the component for far to long starting to melt the surrounding plastic or wire insulation without getting enough heat into the joint to make the solder flow properly. You need a good high powered soldering iron in this situation so you can heat the joint quickly and flow your solder in a few seconds. It is better to rapidly heat the spot you want to join than to get the whole switch/wire etc heated up with an underpowered iron.

When you want to solder things like LED's, Transistors, IC's you ideally need a low powered iron that is not going to put excess heat into the component causing damage.

That is why a variable temperature controlled iron is a good move as you can use it for both situations.

One thing that people also miss out is choosing the right tip, I imagine that this iron cones with a honking great big tip, 4-5mm, again ideal for joining cables but far to big for delicate soldering. I use either a 2.5mm screwdriver shape tip or a pointed tip for soldering on a PCB.
#28
Going_Digital
... the iron continually consumes that wattage of power and converts it to heat.


Eh? :roll:
#29
Oh well we are on the subject of tips for soldering, here is one to share with you.

Don't be tempted to tin wires that are to be used in a compression fitting, for example wires that will be inserted into a screw terminal or have a crimp fitted bullet or spade connector fitted to the wire as solder will actually migrate under the pressure acting as a lubricant so the connection will come undone.
#30
bigsky
Eh? :roll:


A 20Watt Iron will consume 20W of electricity and convert that to heat and a 30W iron will consume 30W and convert that into heat continually. The extra wattage has to go somewhere and it is extra heat.

There is no temperature control so the iron will just get hotter.
#31
Going_Digital
A 20Watt Iron will consume 20W of electricity and convert that to heat and a 30W iron will consume 30W and convert that into heat continually. The extra wattage has to go somewhere and it is extra heat.

There is no temperature control so the iron will just get hotter.


What, forever?

LOL. :-D

I don't think you know what you are talking about.
#32
bigsky
What, forever?

LOL. :-D

I don't think you know what you are talking about.


Hmm

Yes just like an electric heater it just throws out heat continuously non stop, the room gets hotter and hotter. A 1KW heater will not make a room as hot as a 2KW heater.

Try it for yourself if like, measure the temperature of the tip of a 20W iron vs a 30W iron, the metal parts on the 30W iron will be hotter as the heat dissipated to the air will be less.
#33
bigsky
What, forever?

LOL. :-D

I don't think you know what you are talking about.


Just so it's clear a higher wattage iron does not necessarily mean a hotter iron. Irons without thermostatic control are thermally balanced - at the designed operational temperature they radiate as much heat as they generate and therefore reach a stable temperature. Therefore a large wattage iron with a big surface area could run cooler than a small wattage iron with very little surface area.

The power is needed to cope with the thermal demands on the iron when you start soldering, as I explained earlier.
#34
Going_Digital
A 1KW heater will not make a room as hot as a 2KW heater.


Now I know for sure that you don't know what you are talking about.
#35
bigsky
Just so it's clear a higher wattage iron does not necessarily mean a hotter iron. Irons without thermostatic control are thermally balanced - at the designed operational temperature they radiate as much heat as they generate and therefore reach a stable temperature. Therefore a large wattage iron with a big surface area could run cooler than a small wattage iron with very little surface area.

The power is needed to cope with the thermal demands on the iron when you start soldering, as I explained earlier.


LOL, you think that much thought and effort goes into a £5 soldering iron ?
#36
Going_Digital
LOL, you think that much thought and effort goes into a £5 soldering iron ?


For anyone with a basic grasp of thermodynamics it is not much effort at all! :p
#37
bigsky;8662196
Heat will damage a semiconductor junction quite easily....


Yes, it will, but a cheap iron can easily destroy a semiconductor device before heat is even an issue through leakage current - that is the point I was getting at. The main reason an Antex (etc) iron is more expensive is due the construction, with much better electrical insulation between the element and the tip - this prevents the leakage current which can destroy semiconductor devices (particularly CMOS...)
#38
Going_Digital
I don't know much about jewellery but I would imagine that you would need to use a silver solder rather than the the tin alloy solders used in electronics. Silver solder probably needs quite a high temperature. Seeing as how it is just a one off I think you are probably better going to a small independent jeweller to get it repaired otherwise you are going to have to buy an iron and some silver solder that probably won't get used again.


I used to knock up high end interconnects with silver solder. The tube here contains a fair amount, a regular 17w soldering iron should suffice :

http://www.maplin.co.uk/Module.aspx?ModuleNo=34965&C=SO&U=strat15
#39
gizmouk
Simple advice: Don't try it yourself

In addition to Going_Digitals post:

There's an real art to soldering that takes a fair amount of practice to learn. if you haven't tried it before, you'll make a complete monkeys breakfast of it - and in this case, make a mess of your chain.
Best bet is to take it to a good independent jeweller (not the High Street chains), and have them do it. It'll cost you a bit more than doing it yourself, but they'll do a good job. Chances are you wont be able to see the join :thumbsup:


Soldering is really easy. Just make sure you heat up the two parts sufficiently and then push the solder onto it. Bingo. Just don't do it when its too cold or put too much on.
#40
Total newbie to soldering, I need to replace my AC power jack on my Dell Inspiron laptop, would this piece of kit do?

If not anyone got any ideas where I can get it repaired cheap on the high street? I keep getting quotes between £50-60 :(

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