Sony KDL46EX703U LED TV - £727.62 @ John Lewis - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HUKD app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit
291Expired

Sony KDL46EX703U LED TV - £727.62 @ John Lewis

churni Avatar
6y, 1m agoFound 6 years, 1 month ago
Before i say anything, let me state, this is not a duplicate as the price and method is different to what is currently posted.

At the moment, sony are doing VAT back schemes on this tv which is listed on the website at £854.95.

with sonys vat back, it comes down to £727.62.

*NOTE* VAT must be redeemed before 31st January 2011.

This is a fantastic price for a fantastic tv. i would snap it up if i had the money!!!

the tv is LED and is very thin. also, it comes with a 5 YEAR GUARANTEE

also it includes internet tv, bbc iplayer and lovefilm, etc.
Deal Tags:
More From John Lewis:
×
Get the Hottest Deals Daily
Stay informed. Once a day, we'll send you the deals our members voted as the best.
Failed
churni Avatar
6y, 1m agoFound 6 years, 1 month ago
Options

All Comments

(18) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
1 Like #1
To be precise, this is an LCD TV with LED edge lighting. The advantage of LED edge lighting is that the display can be made much thinner but there are some disadvantages in picture quality compared to full array LED backlighting. For a more detailed explanation see here: http://hometheater.about.com/od/televisions/qt/ledlcdtvfacts.htm
1 Like #2
sorry but full array LED backlighting is still an LCD with LED's at the back but the technology is better with localised dimming while losing the advantage of the 'extra thin' aspect. but to stop being pedantic about the technology, the price of the tv is very low which makes it, in my eyes, i very good deal.

i do not doubt that you are right about the technological aspect of the tv. but this is hotukdeals, not avforums :)
#3
anyone know what u would end up paying for this with partnership discount of 12%?
would it be £854.95 - 12% £752.36 less vat £639.51?? not sure on t&cs

comparing this with the panny john l doing for £629 is this worth that bit more??

Edited By: the badger on Oct 30, 2010 22:08: added comment
#4
Good deal, heat added
#5
indeed a good price for 46" branded TV
#6
Does it have anynet + ?
#7
indianajon
To be precise, this is an LCD TV with LED edge lighting. The advantage of LED edge lighting is that the display can be made much thinner but there are some disadvantages in picture quality compared to full array LED backlighting. For a more detailed explanation see here: http://hometheater.about.com/od/televisions/qt/ledlcdtvfacts.htm

Unfortunately its not quite as clear cut with the current range of LED backlit panels. Theoretically there may be "disadvantages" when compared to a full array LED panel, but in practice it is mixed bag. Therefore you may find certain edge lit sets have the edge (pun intended) over certain full array sets. As always the best advice is to try and demo sets (preferably at a retailer who will allow you to play with the settings, inputs and environment) within your budget before taking the plunge.

Voted hot btw, as its a good price. However, IMO these will only come down as the XMAS 3D push comes into full swing.
#8
i know it has bbc iplayer. whats anynet+?
#9
I've got the 40" version ordered from play.com for £675 (my bro works for play so got discount). I did alot of research before i made my decision, this came out tops for what i wanted it for (fast response time for gaming and the use of USB to watch movies). This is a cracking price for the 46"!!! Superb TV from the essential SONY range. Heat added!

Edited By: Lakes74 on Oct 31, 2010 13:00: added more info
#10
Mentos
indianajon
To be precise, this is an LCD TV with LED edge lighting. The advantage of LED edge lighting is that the display can be made much thinner but there are some disadvantages in picture quality compared to full array LED backlighting. For a more detailed explanation see here: [url=" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://hometheater.about.com/od/televisions/qt/ledlcdtvfacts.htm
Unfortunately its not quite as clear cut with the current range of LED backlit panels. Theoretically there may be "disadvantages" when compared to a full array LED panel, but in practice it is mixed bag. Therefore you may find certain edge lit sets have the edge (pun intended) over certain full array sets. As always the best advice is to try and demo sets (preferably at a retailer who will allow you to play with the settings, inputs and environment) within your budget before taking the plunge.Voted hot btw, as its a good price. However, IMO these will only come down as the XMAS 3D push comes into full swing.

So what technology is employed by edge mounted LEDs to give them an advanatage over a full matrix which (being full matrix) offers more even lighting? Don't forget, edge mounted lighting means the light has to be diffused to produce even a hint of evenness and we know the disadvantages in employing this method. Also, don't forget that a full matrix also has the advantage of performing localised dimming - obviously, edge mounted lighting cannot achieve this especially since there is diffusion of light.

I cannot see why edge mounted LED has the edge with the exception of lower prices and thinner displays (yes, for some this is paramount).
#11
I would suggest you re-read my post, I was not commenting on the theoretical advantages of one over the other. I was referring to the real world implimentations.

Being full matrix does not automatically offer you more even lighting as you suggest. The end result is entirely in the implimentation and it is the difficulties in getting the implimentation correct at lower price points which has led manufacturers down the edge lit route.

While using fibre optic arrays/light plates to disperse light accross a panel has its disadvantages, it produces more graduated changes in backlight intensity accross the screen, then a full array screen which doesn't have the required density or quality of LED's or a well engineered dispersion layer. This is only accentuated if one then tries to employ local dimming on such a set.

I am not arguing that an edge lit set will be better then the better full array sets. I'm saying that being full array does not automatically make the panel better then all edge lit displays. Hence the use of the word "certain" This is particularly true at this price point

BTW you could impliment localised dimming with edge lit technology, you just couldn't do it to the same resolution and granuality as the best full array sets (don't forget the granuality of localised dimming on full array sets is dependant on the density of LED's and number of discretely controllable zones. Which ofcourse varies from one implimentation to the next).



Edited By: Mentos on Oct 31, 2010 14:00: edit
#12
Look - its a cracking telly and I'm gutted I bought mine two weeks ago as the promotion requires the TV be bought after 28/10/2010.

I can promise you that the debate about edge vs backlit will be irrelevant as the picture quality and contrast ratio are superb. However, it is a very thin telly so you can't get great speakers in the chassis. The sound is adequate but nothing to write home about.

I am totally impressed by the upscaling quality on SD broadcast, never mind the mind blowing HD capabilities. At this price it is an absolute steal.

If you have the cash (and now you need £150 less than I did) get it!
#13
Mentos
I would suggest you re-read my post, I was not commenting on the theoretical advantages of one over the other. I was referring to the real world implimentations.Being full matrix does not automatically offer you more even lighting as you suggest. The end result is entirely in the implimentation and it is the difficulties in getting the implimentation correct at lower price points which has led manufacturers down the edge lit route.While using fibre optic arrays/light plates to disperse light accross a panel has its disadvantages, it produces more graduated changes in backlight intensity accross the screen, then a full array screen which doesn't have the required density or quality of LED's or a well engineered dispersion layer. This is only accentuated if one then tries to employ local dimming on such a set.I am not arguing that an edge lit set will be better then the better full array sets. I'm saying that being full array does not automatically make the panel better then all edge lit displays. Hence the use of the word "certain" This is particularly true at this price pointBTW you could impliment localised dimming with edge lit technology, you just couldn't do it to the same resolution and granuality as the best full array sets (don't forget the granuality of localised dimming on full array sets is dependant on the density of LED's and number of discretely controllable zones. Which ofcourse varies from one implimentation to the next).

Ah, "certain" models but still, I don't believe localised dimming is possible from edge lit displays despite Samsung's and Sony's claims on some of their 2010 models. The dimming applies to various areas of the screen and relies on certain scenes (a la the dreaded dynamic contrast ratios which sends many consumers' pulses racing with their high figures). However, there is no industry standard to define the minimum area that is dimmed to be classed as "local" dimming. A manufacturer could cheekily claim local dimming by dimming all the lights!

An interesting discussion here : http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1273055#post19117046
An article on the "so called edge lit local dimming" : http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&ie=UTF-%208&sl=it&tl=en&u=http://www.dday.it/redazione/968/La-nuova-%20generazione-di-local-%20dimming.html&prev=_t&rurl=translate.google.com&twu=1
#14
ElliottC
Mentos
I would suggest you re-read my post, I was not commenting on the theoretical advantages of one over the other. I was referring to the real world implimentations.Being full matrix does not automatically offer you more even lighting as you suggest. The end result is entirely in the implimentation and it is the difficulties in getting the implimentation correct at lower price points which has led manufacturers down the edge lit route.While using fibre optic arrays/light plates to disperse light accross a panel has its disadvantages, it produces more graduated changes in backlight intensity accross the screen, then a full array screen which doesn't have the required density or quality of LED's or a well engineered dispersion layer. This is only accentuated if one then tries to employ local dimming on such a set.I am not arguing that an edge lit set will be better then the better full array sets. I'm saying that being full array does not automatically make the panel better then all edge lit displays. Hence the use of the word "certain" This is particularly true at this price pointBTW you could impliment localised dimming with edge lit technology, you just couldn't do it to the same resolution and granuality as the best full array sets (don't forget the granuality of localised dimming on full array sets is dependant on the density of LED's and number of discretely controllable zones. Which ofcourse varies from one implimentation to the next).
Ah, "certain" models but still, I don't believe localised dimming is possible from edge lit displays despite Samsung's and Sony's claims on some of their 2010 models. The dimming applies to various areas of the screen and relies on certain scenes (a la the dreaded dynamic contrast ratios which sends many consumers' pulses racing with their high figures). However, there is no industry standard to define the minimum area that is dimmed to be classed as "local" dimming. A manufacturer could cheekily claim local dimming by dimming all the lights!An interesting discussion here : http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1273055#post19117046An article on the "so called edge lit local dimming" : http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&ie=UTF-%208&sl=it&tl=en&u=http://www.dday.it/redazione/968/La-nuova-%20generazione-di-local-%20dimming.html&prev=_t&rurl=translate.google.com&twu=1

I haven't had a chance to extensively audition the 2010 models from those manufacturers outside a brightly lit showroom. Therefore I can't say how well their local dimming works in real world situations. However, theres nothing inherent in edge lit technology which precludes local dimming. It's just done in a different way to full array sets and obviously can't be done to the same granualarity.

You have to remember that both technologies have some significant differences and the requirements of local dimming are not quite the same. A full array backlit display using a diffusion layer requires smaller dimming zones in order to be acceptable, as if it doesn't the negative effects such as "halo effect" will be worse then no dimming at all. On the other hand an edge lit display with a reflective panel may be able to get away with larger dimming zones as while there will be backlight irregularities the local dimming itself won't always be so off putting its not worth using.

The biggest problems with both is how well the technology is implimented. You can get serious (not acceptable to the end user) irregularities on either because of the diffusion layer or reflective panel being poorly designed or having too loose a tolerance for imperfections.

The perfect set would be a RGB (or tri-luminous as Sony call it) full array backlit panel, with a well engineered diffusion layer and panel structure over all (usually means it can't be super thin). But they ain't cheap, and as you move down the price bracket you'll find the type of backlight technology used doesn't automatically tell you which set is better. Edge lit sets could have two dimming zones and claim local dimming. But by the same token, full array sets could have a handfull of LED's. I know which I'd prefer in that case.
#15
Great Tv, but the 40" is far superior in terms of picture quality. Just take a look at the prices.
#16
Gozman
Great Tv, but the 40" is far superior in terms of picture quality. Just take a look at the prices.


lcd picture quality will be superior the smaller the screen ... better to have plasma for bigger screens gas travels faster liquid slower
#17
Zameen
Gozman
Great Tv, but the 40" is far superior in terms of picture quality. Just take a look at the prices.


lcd picture quality will be superior the smaller the screen ... better to have plasma for bigger screens gas travels faster liquid slower


????

Given the appropriate viewing distance the size of the screen is irrelevant. What you do find is certain models use a different panel type for the larger displays due to cost and availability, therefore in some cases there will be a difference in picture quality/performance. It's not a universal trait which allows you to make a sweeping statement about all displays.

Really not sure what you are referring to about the speed at which liquids/gas travel. The liquid crystals in a LCD display simply change polarisation when voltage is applied.
#18
Unfortunately, now expired - the price at John Lewis has now gone up to £949
Argh, I wanted to see the real thing before I ordered... but now price has gone up :(

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Top of Page
Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!