The Curry Secret: How to Cook Real Indian Restaurant Meals at Home (Paperback) £3.96 @ Amazon - HotUKDeals
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The Secrets revealed!

Good reviews too,

Free delivered as well,

Have a nice curry night!

Description
The recipes behind the Indian restaurant curry are an extremely closely guarded secret. In the pages of The Curry Secret Indian restaurateur Kris Dhillon breaks with tradition and reveals all so that anyone can recreate those unique and authentic flavours in their own kitchen....

Not just hot, but spicy too! ;)
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#1
british indian restaurants? cream, sugar, food colouring and a bit of curry powder. thats the secret
#2
I have this book. Very good recipies - just like a real Indian meal/take-away. But you need to follow them to the letter. Worth it though...
#3
Does it have starters in as well ?
banned#4
crazymacaque;7503330
british indian restaurants? cream, sugar, food colouring and a bit of curry powder. thats the secret

then get this book and make a PROPER one!

the book is excellent :thumbsup:
#5
crazymacaque
british indian restaurants? cream, sugar, food colouring and a bit of curry powder. thats the secret


I agree!

I think a good curry needs fresh ingredients like fresh green chillies, curry leaves, coriender, some home made masala and the most important thing is: time!

Then you can easily beat that corner takeaway or popular restaurant in the town!;-)
banned#6
Jaspr;7503393
Does it have starters in as well ?

review from amazon:-

After dipping into several books on how to cook the ideal curry, I found this book actually serves up a 'curry house' curry. All other books were good for the curry sundries, but when it came to the actual main course, the flavour was disappointing. This book however, offers the complete meal: starters, main and sundries, all of which taste similar to what you would find in your local. This is an excellent read and easy to follow, even for a kitchen liability like me.
#7
Ordered.
Excellent.
I've been looking for something like this. Thanks :-)
#8
csiman
then get this book and make a PROPER one!

the book is excellent :thumbsup:


yeah I should give it a go, just sceptical because the vast majority of indian restaurants in this country are so poor. Really only a handful of decent ones out of many I have been to (Drummond st in london is good)
1 Like #9
crazymacaque
british indian restaurants? cream, sugar, food colouring and a bit of curry powder. thats the secret


You missed out salt : enough to keep the M25 clear of snow. :thumbsup:

Hot deal though :thumbsup:
#10
I live in a relitively small town, yet we have over 20 indian takeaways. Only one of these will I use, and even they have off days. How the others survive is beyond me!

Will order this, thanks.
#11
I have a dog-eared old paperback of this book and if you want a British Indian Restaurant style curry (rather than authentic Asian cuisine) then it is very good.
banned#12
WORD OF WARNING

When making the curry gravy / stock, then open all your windows and seal off your kitchen. The smell is really really pungent and lasts for days if you dont have ventilation. You will also need a blender to get the suace perfectly smooth.

tbh, I only use the book for the stock, then freeze it in bulk and then use that with whatever ingredients I fancy on the day .The 3 essential ones are the three Cs (ground Coriander, chilli, cumin).

I found the gravy recipe a little difficult to read as its not well presented. Here it is in my easier to understand format.

the perfect curry sauce:-

CURRY SAUCE RECIPE – For approximately 8-12 servings

Prep & cooking time – 1hr 30m
2lb (900g) cooking onions
2oz (50g) green ginger
2oz (50g) garlic
2.75 pt (1L 570ml) water
1tsp salt
1 tin (9oz/225g) tomatoes
8tblsp veg oil
1tsp tomato puree
1tsp turmeric
1tsp paprika

Stage 1
1. Peel & rinse onions, ginger & garlic.
2. Slice onions and roughly chop ginger & garlic
3. Blend ginger & garlic with 0.5pt (275ml) water
4. Put blended ginger & garlic, the onions and remainder of water into large pan
5. Add the salt and bring to the boil, then simmer on low with lid on for 40-45 minutes
6. Leave to cool

Stage 2
1. Once cooled, pour half the mixture into a blender and blend until absolutely smooth
2. Pour blended mixture into a clean pan or bowl and repeat step 1 with the other half of the mixture
3. Freezing recommended at this stage (divide into 4-5 portions of 400ml to make servings for 2-3 people with each portion)

Stage 3
1. Blend tomatoes until smooth
2. In a clean saucepan, put oil, tom puree, turmeric & paprika
3. Add blended tomatoes and bring to the boil
4. Turn down the heat and simmer for 10 minutes stirring occasionally
5. Now add the onion mixture and return to simmer
6. Skim off froth that forms and keep simmering for another 20 minutes, removing froth and stirring occasionally
7. Use immediately or cool & refrigerate for up to 4 days.
banned 2 Likes #13
then an example of a curry using the prepared gravy:-

CHICKEN DHANSAK

6 tblsp veg oil
275ml of curry sauce as above
2 cups lentil dal (see imprtant note below)
450g chicken
0.5tsp salt
0.5tsp chilli powder
1 green chilli finely chopped
1.5tsp garam masala
1tsp ground cumin
2tblsp lemon juice
1tblsp chopped green coriander

1. heat oil in large deep fry pan
2. add curry sauce and lentils and bring to the boil
3. Whilst boiling, add chicken, salt, chilli powder and ground chilli
4. stir well and cook on high for 5 mins
5. turn down to summer for another 5 mins
skim off excess oil and stir in garam masal, cumin & lemon juice
6. serve sprinked with coriander

Do NOT make the mistake I made of using lentils. You have to use lentil Dal (google is your friend).
#14
Had this for years. It really does allow you to produce 'authentic' UK style curries. Recommended!
banned#15
kapust;7503655
Sounds interesting

:thinking::thinking::thinking::thinking:
#16
I also have an old dog-eared copy of this book and I agree that it will give you the nearest thing to a takeaway from your own kitchen. But it still is no substitute for me. At the price I would definitely recommend it, and it is fun making up the initial sauce. The comments about the smell and needing a blender are true, but the texture of the meat after being cooked slowly from raw in the first sauce is fantastic, a lot better than frying the beejeezus out of it right at the start which is where most home-made curries go wrong.
#17
csiman

Stage 1
......

Stage 2
3. Freezing recommended at this stage (divide into 4-5 portions of 400ml to make servings for 2-3 people with each portion)

Stage 3
1. Blend tomatoes until smooth
......


I'm confused, you freeze it at stage 2 .... but then what is stage 3 for?
#18
BigAde
You missed out salt : [SIZE="4"]enough to keep the M25 clear of snow[/SIZE]. :thumbsup:

Hot deal though :thumbsup:


:w00t::p lol. very true..
#19
I heard that most indian chefs stopped using ghee about 20 years ago.
#20
Excellent book this, I have had it for almost 20 years.
Follow the recipes for a while then use the sauce
for your own experiments, works a treat.
#21
crazymacaque;7503330
british indian restaurants? cream, sugar, food colouring and a bit of curry powder. thats the secret

hotnspicy;7503461
I agree!
I think a good curry needs fresh ingredients like fresh green chillies, curry leaves, coriender, some home made masala and the most important thing is: time!
Then you can easily beat that corner takeaway or popular restaurant in the town!;-)


Odd that so many people have been try for years then!
With my work, I have spent MANY a long hour in British Indian Restaurants (BIR) behind the scenes, and I am none the wiser either. It is a very secretive business!

I think you may be relating to a glut of recent "Indian" restaurants that are indeed very poor, back in the late 60's to late 70's there was a smaller number, and the standard was very different, many of us would love to recreate the BIR style, but it is like trying to turn lead into Gold! If you weren't around back then, not many places are the same now, so you won't have quite the same refernce point, and probably think curry is like you buy in Asda or like you find in the rare 1 star Michelin places!

Many of the recent Indian or regional restaurants are in a very different vein, and so far haven't found one I like - you get a style of food that is more akin to domestic Indian food, which is NOT the same sort of thing at all compared to British Indian Restaurant food, which happens to be what I grew up to expect, and is now so rare. The people doing this all came from Sylhet in Bangladesh, but even though many still do, the standard has fallen steadily over the years as the old chefs go and are replaced by younger ones with different backgrounds :-( New places like the Lasan in Birmingham (as won the Gordon Ramsey F-Word final) has some shades of the old style, but SO much of the new, so even those places don't meet the expectations

The domestic style of food from the Indian sub continent isn't to my taste, or to many other Europeans either, although I must admit some of the basic cooking techniques I learned from a South Asian Indian friend - things like Chapati, Pooris and cooking of rice helped me a lot. Can't stand the food she cooks though! Most recipe books are based on this sort of food. Celebrity chefs always make me laugh when they cook "Indian" food too... nothign like either BIR OR the Domestic food!

As I posted on another thread recently... this site:
http://cr0.co.uk/curry/index.php is full of info for those interested in BIR food.
#22
Casey2901;7504442
I heard that most indian chefs stopped using ghee about 20 years ago.


True enough, again people confuse domestic food styles with British Indian Restaurant (BIR) styles

TO be honest, I never knew them to use it back then either. Far too expensive!
The most likely place it was found was just to put on Nans and on Chapatis!
#23
northers;7503892
The comments about the smell and needing a blender are true


The first place I ever saw a (BIG!) stick-blender was in an Indian Restaurant Kitchen many years ago, before the Celeb chefs had been heard of and made them trendy! Thankfully for domestic use you can get a basic one dirt cheap now in Asda or Tesco!
banned 1 Like #24
welshblob;7504012
I'm confused, you freeze it at stage 2 .... but then what is stage 3 for?

you can freeze after stage 3 for later use but it is recommended to freeze after that second stage. Then defrost and do stage 3 when you are ready to cook the full curry.
#25
Alright if your into takeaway curries but there no way close to an authentic curry,my dads from pakistan and he takes up to 3-4 hrs to cook a curry leave it over night and it tastes even better.
#26
barbelith2000ad
Alright if your into takeaway curries but there no way close to an authentic curry,my dads from pakistan and he takes up to 3-4 hrs to cook a curry leave it over night and it tastes even better.


Had goat cooking for 5 hours on Sunday - made an awesome biryani.
#27
crazymacaque
Had goat cooking for 5 hours on Sunday - made an awesome biryani.


If you don't mind me asking where did you get the goat meat. I can never find any genuine goat around Leeds/Bradford area.

Any feedback appreciated
#28
Theres nothing like a good home made curry from scratch.
This book will come in very handy for parties. Just ordered my copy.

Top Post
Heat Added.
#29
i much prefer the curry house curry's to authentic ones.. much more sauce!!
#30
Had this for a few years and it is great. It takes an age to make the base sauce, but they really do taste authentic. Well, authentic British curry, not authentic Indian!
#31
Just ordered - thanks :thumbsup:
#32
I have this book and brought it for £1.99 in the works:thumbsup:
#33
northerngeezer
If you don't mind me asking where did you get the goat meat. I can never find any genuine goat around Leeds/Bradford area.

Any feedback appreciated


I don't live in your area, but most afro-caribbean shops have frozen goat meat, which is actually really just as good as fresh goat meat. Even helps tenderise it when its been frozen. I know 3 afro-caribbean shops (Edinburgh and Glasgow) and they all sell goat meat.
#34
Just bought this, cheers.

I just love Amazons iPhone app and 1 Click Purchase
#35
Thanks for the comments and heat!

I am glad my post reached the HOT page! (first time ever):)

For the members who need more inspiration to cook at home, I found 'Cooking at Home' @ www.curry2night.co.u/recipe.aspx is good and funny enough!;-)

Cheers!
#36
Goat i'm not too sure,we use sheep/mutton any halal asian butchers will sell it and i'd guess they'd sell goat too?
#37
thanks heat added and book ordered! I only know how to cook the one curry :)
#38
barbelith2000ad
Goat i'm not too sure,we use sheep/mutton any halal asian butchers will sell it and i'd guess they'd sell goat too?


In India goat is often referred to as mutton, but over here is obviously sheep. I've not found it so much in halal asian butchers - not sure if this is to do with the fact that goat is difficult to source in the first place, so getting a halal source of goat would be even more difficult.
banned#39
barbelith2000ad;7505770
Alright if your into takeaway curries but there no way close to an authentic curry,my dads from pakistan and he takes up to 3-4 hrs to cook a curry leave it over night and it tastes even better.

have you tried this book then or just guessing?

It does actually take 2 hours just to make the curry gravy which is why you make it in bulk. Then a further hour to cook a curry using it.
#40
federalex
i much prefer the curry house curry's to authentic ones.. much more sauce!!


I thought I was the only one that felt the same.

Authentic Indian curry is great, but I really do like BIR curry.
Much in the same way as much as I like Authentic Chinese, I'm much happier having salty MSG induced takeaway.

It's not like I do it very often so I'm more than happy to take the hit........

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