Time Out Pad / Naughty Step - £1.99 Instore @ Home Bargains - HotUKDeals
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the link takes you to kiddicare so you can see what its like :)
£24.99 at http://www.babyandco.com

Time Out Pad Description
Helps parents make the most of the naughty step technique.

To help children learn when their behaviour isn't acceptable, many parents use the 'naughty step' or 'time out' technique, making the child sit quietly (usually on the bottom step of the stairs) for a few minutes to calm down and reflect on their actions. Time outs are a great way for the parents to stay calm too!

Simple to use pressure pad with built-in time
Visual countdown and audio function
Child 'tamper proof' controls
Timer allows different time-out durations for different ages (1 - 5 minutes)
Alarm alerts parent should the child leave the pad.
Suitable for children from 2 years upwards
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5y, 8m agoFound 5 years, 8 months ago
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#1
can you buy this online?
#2
not from homebargains no :(
32 Likes #3
Seriously, even at £1.99 this is the biggest waste of space and money! No wonder your child is on the naughty step, if you cant even be arsed to manage the time they're on the naughty step!... all this does is leave the child more neglected and waiting for a light to change colour with no concept of adjusting behavior. Bet most kids see this as a game.

LAZY GADGET FOR LAZY PARENTS!!!




Edited By: ourdevonfamily on Apr 03, 2011 20:31: ...
#4
blimey what ever next oO
#5
good deal if you want one though!
2 Likes #6
.....More "neglected" and waiting.....

Thats it, Go sit on the naughty step!!

ourdevonfamily
Seriously, even at £1.99 this is the biggest waste of space and money! No wonder your child is on the naughty step, if you cant even be arsed to manage the time they're on the naughty step!... all this does is leave the child more negleted and waiting for a light to change colour with no concept of adjusting behavior. Bet most kids see this as a game.

LAZY GADGET FOR LAZY PARENTS!!!


#7
Ooops... but you're ok, I never get off it!... stupid 'Time Out Pad' is stuck on a red light!! I hope it changes soon, i need a wee and might electrocute myself sat here!


laldude
.....More "neglected" and waiting.....

Thats it, Go sit on the naughty step!!

ourdevonfamily
Seriously, even at £1.99 this is the biggest waste of space and money! No wonder your child is on the naughty step, if you cant even be arsed to manage the time they're on the naughty step!... all this does is leave the child more negleted and waiting for a light to change colour with no concept of adjusting behavior. Bet most kids see this as a game.

LAZY GADGET FOR LAZY PARENTS!!!


#8
Good price reduction, but yeah, you would have to be a seriously crap parent if you couldn't even be bothered to time it yourself.
[mod] 10 Likes #9
Personally - I think this is a good deal. Price wise - for starters it's a bargain. Also, the 'naughty step' is an effective way of teaching toddlers that their behaviour is not acceptable. If a gadget can assist in this (for £2) I don't see a problem. I especially like that it has an 'Alarm alerts parent should the child leave the pad' - that is very handy - as one of the points of the 'naughty step' is that you do neglect your child for a few minutes. It aint gonna do any harm for them to be sitting still and reflecting for a few minutes about their actions / behaviour - on the contrary - it is a proven technique to improve behaviour.

Meanwhile - I'm off to post in a few TV threads that televisions are ruining the art of conversation.
1 Like #10
heat from me, used to use the timer on the oven this is better and portable too taking it out with you to visit friends reminds the child that they still have to be good, and you prob would not even have to use it
2 Likes #11
andywedge
Personally - I think this is a good deal. Price wise - for starters it's a bargain. Also, the 'naughty step' is an effective way of teaching toddlers that their behaviour is not acceptable. If a gadget can assist in this (for £2) I don't see a problem. I especially like that it has an 'Alarm alerts parent should the child leave the pad' - that is very handy - as one of the points of the 'naughty step' is that you do neglect your child for a few minutes. It aint gonna do any harm for them to be sitting still and reflecting for a few minutes about their actions / behaviour - on the contrary - it is a proven technique to improve behaviour.

Meanwhile - I'm off to post in a few TV threads that televisions are ruining the art of conversation.
sorry andy but i have to agree with ourdevonfamily. Naughty steps and time-outs are only for lazy, selfish parents who can't give their children the time and love they need.
2 Likes #12
andywedge
Personally - I think this is a good deal. Price wise - for starters it's a bargain. Also, the 'naughty step' is an effective way of teaching toddlers that their behaviour is not acceptable. If a gadget can assist in this (for £2) I don't see a problem. I especially like that it has an 'Alarm alerts parent should the child leave the pad' - that is very handy - as one of the points of the 'naughty step' is that you do neglect your child for a few minutes. It aint gonna do any harm for them to be sitting still and reflecting for a few minutes about their actions / behaviour - on the contrary - it is a proven technique to improve behaviour.

Meanwhile - I'm off to post in a few TV threads that televisions are ruining the art of conversation.


not feeling the need to write my entire post in bold, but you are missing the point entirely.

The naughty step should be managed by the parent, so the child understands who is applying the discipline to them and learns to understand who sets the rules.

With items like this its no wonder children take no notice of their parents.
3 Likes #13
andywedge
Personally - I think this is a good deal. Price wise - for starters it's a bargain. Also, the 'naughty step' is an effective way of teaching toddlers that their behaviour is not acceptable. If a gadget can assist in this (for £2) I don't see a problem. I especially like that it has an 'Alarm alerts parent should the child leave the pad' - that is very handy - as one of the points of the 'naughty step' is that you do neglect your child for a few minutes. It aint gonna do any harm for them to be sitting still and reflecting for a few minutes about their actions / behaviour - on the contrary - it is a proven technique to improve behaviour.

Meanwhile - I'm off to post in a few TV threads that televisions are ruining the art of conversation.

The naughty step is not a technique used regularly by trained child care professionals as it fails to address long term goals of child developing belonging and attachment with family, teaches that time-out is a negative punishment rather then a positive life skill, invites power struggles, fails to teach problem solving or co-operation skills, can incite anger, frustration, and resentment, ignores the childs feelings that led to misbehaviour, is a barrier to parent-child communication, fails to teach internal controls and self-discipline, fails to teach conflict resolution and thinking skills, gives negative attention to misbehaviour which may increase misbehaviour, label’s child with unhealthy self esteem. “The naughty child goes to the naughty step” & increases original and repeat behaviours because child’s underlying needs not addressed.

It is pointless to send a young child onto the naughty step to reflect on what they did wrong as children, generally, do not have reflective skills until age 7.

The naughty step was a concept popularised by Supernanny (not a real superhero BTW) for the benefit of mass tv audiences, not the benefit of the child. This pad just re-inforces the behaviour of the lazy parent.

Good article from the times on parenting and use of naughty step
http://women.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/women/families/article7128742.ece







Edited By: blowbrown on Apr 03, 2011 21:28: adding link
5 Likes #14
Well it beats what happened to me as a child - a beating !
1 Like #15
I never needed the naughty step, if my boy was naughty i sat him down and talked to him, explaining why it was naughty to do what ever he did wrong, He has his moments but never really naughty.
my friends little boy is just 2 years old and whenever he is naughty he holds his hands up in the air and says ok i going now! and goes straight to the bottom step on the stairs and counts to 2 on his fingers lol
good deal if you need this
#16
blowbrown
andywedge
Personally - I think this is a good deal. Price wise - for starters it's a bargain. Also, the 'naughty step' is an effective way of teaching toddlers that their behaviour is not acceptable. If a gadget can assist in this (for £2) I don't see a problem. I especially like that it has an 'Alarm alerts parent should the child leave the pad' - that is very handy - as one of the points of the 'naughty step' is that you do neglect your child for a few minutes. It aint gonna do any harm for them to be sitting still and reflecting for a few minutes about their actions / behaviour - on the contrary - it is a proven technique to improve behaviour.

Meanwhile - I'm off to post in a few TV threads that televisions are ruining the art of conversation.

The naughty step is not a technique used regularly by trained child care professionals as it fails to address long term goals of child developing belonging and attachment with family, teaches that time-out is a negative punishment rather then a positive life skill, invites power struggles, fails to teach problem solving or co-operation skills, can incite anger, frustration, and resentment, ignores the childs feelings that led to misbehaviour, is a barrier to parent-child communication, fails to teach internal controls and self-discipline, fails to teach conflict resolution and thinking skills, gives negative attention to misbehaviour which may increase misbehaviour, label’s child with unhealthy self esteem. “The naughty child goes to the naughty step” & increases original and repeat behaviours because child’s underlying needs not addressed.

It is pointless to send a young child onto the naughty step to reflect on what they did wrong as children, generally, do not have reflective skills until age 7.

The naughty step was a concept popularised by Supernanny (not a real superhero BTW) for the benefit of mass tv audiences, not the benefit of the child. This pad just re-inforces the behaviour of the lazy parent.

The 'naughty step' is not a used technique no, but 'time out' is. This has been used in 2 schools and nurserys I have worked in also in my daughters pre school and now primary school. I am definately in favour of it having used it myself. We have done time out with our daughter since she was 2 years old and it transformed her behaviour. She is 4 now and in the past 6 months we've only used time out around two times so for us the results are proven.
However I find this 'time out pad' absolutely pointless and defeating the object of time out all together. The parent is not in control what so ever by using this, children will see this as a game. It is very lazy parenting in my opinion
#17
johnmcglinchey
Well it beats what happened to me as a child - a beating !


so true! i didnt even have to be bad to get one!
#18
johnmcglinchey
Well it beats what happened to me as a child - a beating !

You mean the good old days. Someone once said to me that they used to get beaten as a child and it never did them any harm. The irony is that they were on parole having just served a lengthy sentence for armed robbery.....
4 Likes #19
I can't believe how rude you are all being about the product or people who choose to buy it!

I purchased it when it was £10 at Amazon a while ago. We have two boys aged two and three. We use the time-out step for the alarm facility and also to let the 'better behaving' son know that his brother is still having time-out and that he cannot play with him until the green light appears.

If you don't like it - don't buy it! Do not berate other people for being 'lazy' for buying it. Trust me with two toddlers, a teenager and a full time job I don't have time to be 'lazy.'
1 Like #20
is it waterproof? we could leave it outside in the garden for when they are naught, just till we get home from work oO

or maybe give it to their teacher, after all it's their job to bring up our children anyway.
#21
sarahh112
I can't believe how rude you are all being about the product or people who choose to buy it!

I purchased it when it was £10 at Amazon a while ago. We have two boys aged two and three. We use the time-out step for the alarm facility and also to let the 'better behaving' son know that his brother is still having time-out and that he cannot play with him until the green light appears.

If you don't like it - don't buy it! Do not berate other people for being 'lazy' for buying it. Trust me with two toddlers, a teenager and a full time job I don't have time to be 'lazy.'


its not rude to debate...

have you tried telling their older brother they can't play with them whilst on the naughty step, instead of him looking for a green light ?

that way they will know you are in charge, rather than the traffic lights
2 Likes #22
hunter82
blowbrown
andywedge
Personally - I think this is a good deal. Price wise - for starters it's a bargain. Also, the 'naughty step' is an effective way of teaching toddlers that their behaviour is not acceptable. If a gadget can assist in this (for £2) I don't see a problem. I especially like that it has an 'Alarm alerts parent should the child leave the pad' - that is very handy - as one of the points of the 'naughty step' is that you do neglect your child for a few minutes. It aint gonna do any harm for them to be sitting still and reflecting for a few minutes about their actions / behaviour - on the contrary - it is a proven technique to improve behaviour.

Meanwhile - I'm off to post in a few TV threads that televisions are ruining the art of conversation.

The naughty step is not a technique used regularly by trained child care professionals as it fails to address long term goals of child developing belonging and attachment with family, teaches that time-out is a negative punishment rather then a positive life skill, invites power struggles, fails to teach problem solving or co-operation skills, can incite anger, frustration, and resentment, ignores the childs feelings that led to misbehaviour, is a barrier to parent-child communication, fails to teach internal controls and self-discipline, fails to teach conflict resolution and thinking skills, gives negative attention to misbehaviour which may increase misbehaviour, label’s child with unhealthy self esteem. “The naughty child goes to the naughty step” & increases original and repeat behaviours because child’s underlying needs not addressed.

It is pointless to send a young child onto the naughty step to reflect on what they did wrong as children, generally, do not have reflective skills until age 7.

The naughty step was a concept popularised by Supernanny (not a real superhero BTW) for the benefit of mass tv audiences, not the benefit of the child. This pad just re-inforces the behaviour of the lazy parent.

The 'naughty step' is not a used technique no, but 'time out' is. This has been used in 2 schools and nurserys I have worked in also in my daughters pre school and now primary school. I am definately in favour of it having used it myself. We have done time out with our daughter since she was 2 years old and it transformed her behaviour. She is 4 now and in the past 6 months we've only used time out around two times so for us the results are proven.
However I find this 'time out pad' absolutely pointless and defeating the object of time out all together. The parent is not in control what so ever by using this, children will see this as a game. It is very lazy parenting in my opinion

Time out has a place, but not as a punishment. It is useful to give a child (or a parent) time to calm down when things get fraught, but is no replacement to talking things through, and should only ever be used for very short periods of time. Nurseries, particularly private ones, are mostly interested in addressing the presenting behaviour of a child rather than the long term emotional developmental needs. As parent's we have to suport our children to develop healthy attachments, not pre-school or nursery. We have to look beyond the behaviour to the cause.
#23
Ahh! I got this recently from Amazon when it was half price, can't believe that it is only £1.99 in Home Bargains now. Wish I had waited now!
[mod]#24
As with every way of discipling a child / toddler what works for A doesn't work for B and so on. Of course, as parents, our own personal opinion is always right isn't it? (Of course it's not). Nonetheless, the naughty step/time out is an effective way of teaching a child right from wrong for many. Decent and balanced article here

blowbrown - where do you get your info that children don't have reflective skills until the age of 7? I understand that reflective skills start to develop at the age of 3.
#25
[/quote]
The 'naughty step' is not a used technique no, but 'time out' is. This has been used in 2 schools and nurserys I have worked in also in my daughters pre school and now primary school. I am definately in favour of it having used it myself. We have done time out with our daughter since she was 2 years old and it transformed her behaviour. She is 4 now and in the past 6 months we've only used time out around two times so for us the results are proven.
However I find this 'time out pad' absolutely pointless and defeating the object of time out all together. The parent is not in control what so ever by using this, children will see this as a game. It is very lazy parenting in my opinion[/quote]
Time out has a place, but not as a punishment. It is useful to give a child (or a parent) time to calm down when things get fraught, but is no replacement to talking things through, and should only ever be used for very short periods of time. Nurseries, particularly private ones, are mostly interested in addressing the presenting behaviour of a child rather than the long term emotional developmental needs. As parent's we have to suport our children to develop healthy attachments, not pre-school or nursery. We have to look beyond the behaviour to the cause.[/quote]I never said it was to be used as a punishment at all hence the fact I, and many others use the term 'time out'. It is exactly that, time away from the situation to think about thier behaviour which is also beneficial for the parents as well. At the end of this time you then discuss their behaviour
4 Likes #26
Is this product aimed at people who live in bungalows and don't have steps to put naughty kids on X)
2 Likes #27
checkley73
sarahh112
I can't believe how rude you are all being about the product or people who choose to buy it!

I purchased it when it was £10 at Amazon a while ago. We have two boys aged two and three. We use the time-out step for the alarm facility and also to let the 'better behaving' son know that his brother is still having time-out and that he cannot play with him until the green light appears.

If you don't like it - don't buy it! Do not berate other people for being 'lazy' for buying it. Trust me with two toddlers, a teenager and a full time job I don't have time to be 'lazy.'


its not rude to debate...

have you tried telling their older brother they can't play with them whilst on the naughty step, instead of him looking for a green light ?

that way they will know you are in charge, rather than the traffic lights


So calling it a 'lazy gadget for lazy parents' is part of a logical and well thought out debate - I must have missed that lesson at school.

We have found that the traffic light system works very well for us especially when it is the elder son that is misbehaving and we tell our two year old that he cannot play with the eldest until the light goes green.

Trust me - I am in charge not the children, the teenager, the husband or the traffic lights ;-)

And in response to the person who posted about being a 'seriously crap parent if you couldn't even be bothered to time it yourself' - we find having a visual stimulus works well - they are only two and three after all. This product was never designed to alieviate the need to use a watch or count to five.
1 Like #28
andywedge
As with every way of discipling a child / toddler what works for A doesn't work for B and so on. Of course, as parents, our own personal opinion is always right isn't it? (Of course it's not). Nonetheless, the naughty step/time out is an effective way of teaching a child right from wrong for many. Decent and balanced article here


blowbrown - where do you get your info that children don't have reflective skills until the age of 7? I understand that reflective skills start to develop at the age of 3.

Andy I was referring to a child's ability understand rules in a wider sense (thus reflect on what they have done wrong or what they can do differently). In the pre-operational stage of development from 2 to 7 years.(Piaget), being egocentric they can only focus on one aspect of a situation at any one time. They develop a respect for rules, but can't take anything else (i.e motives) into account. It is not until the concrete operations stage from 7 to 11ish years that a child can think logically and become less egocentric (i.e. can see things from others point of view.) In this stage they develop 'operational' thought i.e. can start to imagine what if something was to happen then it was reversed. Without this ability, childen cannot reflect with any meaning.

The link you posted was interesting and balanced (towards not using the naughty step :D )

Edited By: blowbrown on Apr 03, 2011 22:47
#29
hunter82

The 'naughty step' is not a used technique no, but 'time out' is. This has been used in 2 schools and nurserys I have worked in also in my daughters pre school and now primary school. I am definately in favour of it having used it myself. We have done time out with our daughter since she was 2 years old and it transformed her behaviour. She is 4 now and in the past 6 months we've only used time out around two times so for us the results are proven.
However I find this 'time out pad' absolutely pointless and defeating the object of time out all together. The parent is not in control what so ever by using this, children will see this as a game. It is very lazy parenting in my opinion[/quote]
Time out has a place, but not as a punishment. It is useful to give a child (or a parent) time to calm down when things get fraught, but is no replacement to talking things through, and should only ever be used for very short periods of time. Nurseries, particularly private ones, are mostly interested in addressing the presenting behaviour of a child rather than the long term emotional developmental needs. As parent's we have to suport our children to develop healthy attachments, not pre-school or nursery. We have to look beyond the behaviour to the cause.[/quote]I never said it was to be used as a punishment at all hence the fact I, and many others use the term 'time out'. It is exactly that, time away from the situation to think about thier behaviour which is also beneficial for the parents as well. At the end of this time you then discuss their behaviour[/quote]
So we agree then X)
1 Like #30
The naughty step is for clueless Jo frost wannabe's... Learn to parent, thanks.
5 Likes #31
A lazy parent wouldnt disapline their child in the first place! I think if used right this can be a good thing. I worked in a nursery for 7 years and we used time out. It gave the child a chance to calm down and to help them understand they couldnt do whatever it was they were doing. I dont think time out is lazy at all it takes more work to keep a child on time out than to ignore their behavior! And I thought this was a site for posting deals not for slagging other peoples parenting skills! The price is good
1 Like #32
trueblonde
A lazy parent wouldnt disapline their child in the first place! I think if used right this can be a good thing. I worked in a nursery for 7 years and we used time out. It gave the child a chance to calm down and to help them understand they couldnt do whatever it was they were doing. I dont think time out is lazy at all it takes more work to keep a child on time out than to ignore their behavior! And I thought this was a site for posting deals not for slagging other peoples parenting skills! The price is good

+1
1 Like #33
Naughty step lol, if i played up i used to get a wallop round the back of the head......... worked a treat!!;) i hate all this yank sh*te!!


Edited By: OldEnglish on Apr 04, 2011 10:42
#34
FINALLY!!!

Been needing to get the misses one of these for a while. She often needs to sit on the naughty step
1 Like #35
just get an old sock, and put 199 one pence piece's in a sock, then beat the child with it when they misbehave.

add/remove money from the sock depending on the severity of the naughtiness.

plus, if you need change to pick up your paper, simply remove it from the sock.
#36
lastjunkie
just get an old sock, and put 199 one pence piece's in a sock, then beat the child with it when they misbehave.

add/remove money from the sock depending on the severity of the naughtiness.

plus, if you need change to pick up your paper, simply remove it from the sock.


love it
1 Like #37
Pointless crap.

Nothing wrong with a good slap. They won't do it again after that.
Pathetic that everyone tip toes around kids nowadays.
#38
You can't accuse people of being bad parents just because they use a naughty step. Every child is different, I use the naughty step with my 2 youngest and it modifies their behavior much better than a telling off or a smack, but don't with my eldest as she finds it very upsetting and shameful which isn't really what we want to get from it - explaining what she's done wrong works best with her! 'Horses for courses' innit? You know what's best for your kids, not some dork on a forum, magazine, book or journal.

Edited By: makkax1 on Apr 04, 2011 11:16
1 Like #39
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#30Reply to this commentReport this commentLike this commentIgnore this user Report CommentVinegarTits - Apr 04, 2011 02:29
The naughty step is for clueless Jo frost wannabe's... Learn to parent, thanks.
Such an insightful response with so much to educate everyone on here who need to "Learn to parent" in your opinion!!

As previously stated in a few posts, what is the problem in using this as a way to calm the (guilty as charged) child in question with a few minutes time out, then once expired you have a much more receptive listener to which you explain the error of their ways. I really don't see the logic in stating this is "Lazy Parenting" how can disciplining your child without resorting to a smack or screaming at them be classed as Lazy? Surely it's much easier to just ignore the behaviour or just whallop them until they stop?!

Anyway rant over - good deal and heat added :D
#40
nicmall - Apr 04, 2011 11:16
Pointless crap.

Nothing wrong with a good slap. They won't do it again after that.
Pathetic that everyone tip toes around kids nowadays.
Agee with you i never needed a naughty step when i was a kid if i had ever behaved the way the kids do now never mind a naughty step i would have been looking for a good dentist!! oO

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