Toshiba Chromebook 13.3" Celeron 3955U 1.4GHz, 2GB, 16GB SSD @ Amazon - £199.99 - HotUKDeals
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The newish top-rated Toshiba Chromebook has dropped to sub-£200 now, and previously went hot over £200 just a month ago.

Fab machine for Internet, Office, Music and the best cloud experience available. Sensible 13 inch size as opposed to the tiny ones that are often posted. Build quality also great on mine - plastic but very sturdy unlike Acer netbooks.

Chromebooks aren't for everyone, just like anything else, but this is probably the best price/performance/size Chromebook on the market today.

Blurb:
The 13.3" (33.8cm) Toshiba Chromebook was designed for play, productivity and portability; it's a fast and user-friendly device using the Chrome OS and has full connectivity, a sleek lightweight design and up to 9 hours battery life. With Wi-Fi connectivity and 100GB of free Cloud storage*, you can access your content, files and folders and even store files locally to access when you're not connected to a Wi-Fi network. Once connected, you can seamlessly synchronise your files and data, which makes it ideal for everyone from business professionals to students.

With the flexibility to move seamlessly from editing documents to browsing or playing apps either online or offline, the Chromebook is ideal for modern ways of working, people who already use the cloud and those looking for a light, fashionable and affordable device. Software and security upgrades are free and automatic too, so there's no need to worry about updating your Chromebook.
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#1
http://charts.camelcamelcamel.com/uk/B00HRUSWHY/amazon.png?force=1&zero=0&w=725&h=440&desired=false&legend=1&ilt=1&tp=6m&fo=0&lang=en
#2
Can u pay poker on these
#3
JCLARSSON
Can u pay poker on these

If it's just one of the gambling websites then yeah that'd work, but if it's a piece of software you download then I doubt it as they normally only work with Windows/Mac OS.
#4
does have a slot for sd cards or usb ports etc
#5
No poker apart from browser based ones. Not pokerstars
#6
tracyrenno
does have a slot for sd cards or usb ports etc

Yeah it has a multi-card reader that lets you plug all the popular types in, plus 2 USB 3.0 ports.

Edited By: josephmccowie on Jul 28, 2014 11:02
#7
Also has HDMI out for connecting an additional monitor/HDTV.
#8
Tempting.

Out of interest, what's the trackpad like on yours?

I was trying one out in a shop recently, and I found the slightly bumpy surface very odd, certainly coming from a Macbook. There was also a distinct rattle / looseness to the trackpad, though that could have been down to being an abused display model.
1 Like #9
Kanedaaaaaa
Tempting.

Out of interest, what's the trackpad like on yours?

I was trying one out in a shop recently, and I found the slightly bumpy surface very odd, certainly coming from a Macbook. There was also a distinct rattle / looseness to the trackpad, though that could have been down to being an abused display model.

I actually have a late-2013 MacBook Pro too so I can compare them directly. The textured surface is definitely different coming from the MacBook but after using both for a while I get on fine with both. Obviously since my MBP was £1.5k and the Chromebook just £200 the trackpad isn't as nice to use - it's comparatively small and it hasn't got that lovely smooth glass thing going on. It's also a little 'looser' when clicked, it doesn't have that rock-solidness that the MBP has but we need to keep the price different in perspective here - compared to other £200 laptops the trackpad is actually really good. It's just that coming from an MBP's trackpad you're always going to be disappointed no matter what you use. I certainly wouldn't say it rattled, so that may be a result of shop use.

It does still have plenty of gesture support which is wonderful as I have set up the gestures on the Chromebook to match those on the MBP, and I don't have any significant problems with it, it works fine it just isn't as magic as the one on the MBP.
#10
josephmccowie
Kanedaaaaaa
Tempting.

Out of interest, what's the trackpad like on yours?

I was trying one out in a shop recently, and I found the slightly bumpy surface very odd, certainly coming from a Macbook. There was also a distinct rattle / looseness to the trackpad, though that could have been down to being an abused display model.

I actually have a late-2013 MacBook Pro too so I can compare them directly. The textured surface is definitely different coming from the MacBook but after using both for a while I get on fine with both. Obviously since my MBP was £1.5k and the Chromebook just £200 the trackpad isn't as nice to use - it's comparatively small and it hasn't got that lovely smooth glass thing going on. It's also a little 'looser' when clicked, it doesn't have that rock-solidness that the MBP has but we need to keep the price different in perspective here - compared to other £200 laptops the trackpad is actually really good. It's just that coming from an MBP's trackpad you're always going to be disappointed no matter what you use. I certainly wouldn't say it rattled, so that may be a result of shop use.

It does still have plenty of gesture support which is wonderful as I have set up the gestures on the Chromebook to match those on the MBP, and I don't have any significant problems with it, it works fine it just isn't as magic as the one on the MBP.

Thanks for that, it's good to hear some first hand experience comparing the two. How do you find tap to click? Is it reliable and responsive?

I've only tried a few Chromebooks, but it does seem like no matter what you choose, there has to be a concession to the price somewhere. Build quality, keyboard, screen, trackpad and processor - I've yet to find one that ticks all the boxes, but four out of five will probably do me.

Edited By: Kanedaaaaaa on Jul 28, 2014 13:30
#11
Kanedaaaaaa
josephmccowie
Kanedaaaaaa
Tempting.

Out of interest, what's the trackpad like on yours?

I was trying one out in a shop recently, and I found the slightly bumpy surface very odd, certainly coming from a Macbook. There was also a distinct rattle / looseness to the trackpad, though that could have been down to being an abused display model.

I actually have a late-2013 MacBook Pro too so I can compare them directly. The textured surface is definitely different coming from the MacBook but after using both for a while I get on fine with both. Obviously since my MBP was £1.5k and the Chromebook just £200 the trackpad isn't as nice to use - it's comparatively small and it hasn't got that lovely smooth glass thing going on. It's also a little 'looser' when clicked, it doesn't have that rock-solidness that the MBP has but we need to keep the price different in perspective here - compared to other £200 laptops the trackpad is actually really good. It's just that coming from an MBP's trackpad you're always going to be disappointed no matter what you use. I certainly wouldn't say it rattled, so that may be a result of shop use.

It does still have plenty of gesture support which is wonderful as I have set up the gestures on the Chromebook to match those on the MBP, and I don't have any significant problems with it, it works fine it just isn't as magic as the one on the MBP.

Thanks for that, it's good to hear some first hand experience comparing the two. How do you find tap to click? Is it reliable and responsive?

I've only tried a few Chromebooks, but it does seem like no matter what you choose, there has to be a concession to the price somewhere. Build quality, keyboard, screen, trackpad and processor - I've yet to find one that ticks all the boxes, but four out of five will probably do me.

I usually disable tap-to-click when I'm working normally, as I prefer this setting on the MacBook and I like to have things the same on both or I get confused X)

I do sometimes use tap-to-click at night when I want to be as quiet as possible and as far as I can tell it works fine but you should try to find a non-wrecked one in a shop to make your own mind up.
#12
josephmccowie
Kanedaaaaaa
josephmccowie
Kanedaaaaaa
Tempting.

Out of interest, what's the trackpad like on yours?

I was trying one out in a shop recently, and I found the slightly bumpy surface very odd, certainly coming from a Macbook. There was also a distinct rattle / looseness to the trackpad, though that could have been down to being an abused display model.

I actually have a late-2013 MacBook Pro too so I can compare them directly. The textured surface is definitely different coming from the MacBook but after using both for a while I get on fine with both. Obviously since my MBP was £1.5k and the Chromebook just £200 the trackpad isn't as nice to use - it's comparatively small and it hasn't got that lovely smooth glass thing going on. It's also a little 'looser' when clicked, it doesn't have that rock-solidness that the MBP has but we need to keep the price different in perspective here - compared to other £200 laptops the trackpad is actually really good. It's just that coming from an MBP's trackpad you're always going to be disappointed no matter what you use. I certainly wouldn't say it rattled, so that may be a result of shop use.

It does still have plenty of gesture support which is wonderful as I have set up the gestures on the Chromebook to match those on the MBP, and I don't have any significant problems with it, it works fine it just isn't as magic as the one on the MBP.

Thanks for that, it's good to hear some first hand experience comparing the two. How do you find tap to click? Is it reliable and responsive?

I've only tried a few Chromebooks, but it does seem like no matter what you choose, there has to be a concession to the price somewhere. Build quality, keyboard, screen, trackpad and processor - I've yet to find one that ticks all the boxes, but four out of five will probably do me.

I usually disable tap-to-click when I'm working normally, as I prefer this setting on the MacBook and I like to have things the same on both or I get confused X)

I do sometimes use tap-to-click at night when I want to be as quiet as possible and as far as I can tell it works fine but you should try to find a non-wrecked one in a shop to make your own mind up.

Ah right, I'm the opposite, I always use tap-to-click, but a lot will depend on whether my thumbs hit the trackpad whilst typing. It's happened with a couple of previous laptops, and that's when I disable it.

I'll continue my hunt for a better display unit. Thanks for your help.
#13
I have a Samsung Chromebook, and it really fits a niche where you need a proper browser to edit webpages or blog posts via a portable machine that you can't achieve with a tablet. Its ideal for travelling, and you can easily fit a wireless mouse if you don't like the trackpad - I find mine idea apart from the right click concept needs a bit of getting used to - as does the backspace "key". Its ideal to quickly get on the internet and look at email etc, and runs two of my "must-have" apps - Evernote and Roboform, as well as Google Play Music. Its also ideal as a device to backup SD cards when you are on holiday to avoid the risks of the card failing / getting lost.
#14
Has this dropped because Asus has brought their one out, the C300MA...
1 Like #15
Chromebooks are awesome. They work for the tasks that so many people use everyday, which is web browsing and social media. You can't Skype though which could be a big problem for some people but you can use Google Hangouts, which in some ways is better than Skype, you just have to convince the other parties you normally Skype to setup and use it. The best thing about Chromebooks is the quick bootup which is around 8 seconds and the fact they just work. Printing using a USB cable isn't going to work, so you'll need Google's cloud printing and hope your printer supports it.

Pros:

Very quick, simple, can be used offline which is quite Michael Caine as not a lot of people know that. You might get Linux working, so can be made in to a cheap quick Linux laptop.

Cons:

No Skype, Not compatible with many printers, can't run any Windows software at all.

If you've got Windows 8 and Google Chrome installed then you can try out the Chrome OS experience by going to the top right icon that looks like three horizontal lines and selecting "Relaunch Chrome in Windows 8 mode" then you can try out the Chromebook experience for nothing to see if you like it.

Edited By: fishmaster on Jul 28, 2014 18:14
#16
This is a great piece of kit got one when they launched. The remote desktop app is brilliant too. Great especially considering the price and that you get ms office online etc now
1 Like #17
praevalens
This is a great piece of kit got one when they launched. The remote desktop app is brilliant too. Great especially considering the price and that you get ms office online etc now

Yes, this is the link to MS Office online >

https://office.com/start/default.aspx

This is the link to Chrome Remote Desktop >

https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/chrome-remote-desktop/gbchcmhmhahfdphkhkmpfmihenigjmpp?hl=en

I should get paid for this :)

Edited By: fishmaster on Jul 28, 2014 18:17
1 Like #18
I don't have a lot of time for Google and I certainly don't think it's the best Cloud experience out there - just my personal opinion, I get on very, very well with OneDrive.

However, I have heated this deal.....

My wife and both my daughters use Chromebooks and I have given advice to elderly friends to the effect that they have also purchased Chromebooks. They do offer an extremely simple browsing experience and do so without the risk of viruses or other nasties.

I think Microsoft have missed the boat a little bit on this aspect of personal computing and have long thought that they should have introduced a similar "Windows Lite" that would run on low spec devices such as this, to bring affordable, simple, safe computing to a wider audience.

I would get one of these CB's myself, if I didn't have a perfectly good Ultrabook which is better featured and slightly quicker than one of these.

For the price, these are a bargain.

Edited By: scrumpypaul on Jul 28, 2014 18:33
#19
Wasnt a good experience whenever I used one
1 Like #20
Thanks
#21
fishmaster
Chromebooks are awesome. They work for the tasks that so many people use everyday, which is web browsing and social media. You can't Skype though which could be a big problem for some people but you can use Google Hangouts, which in some ways is better than Skype, you just have to convince the other parties you normally Skype to setup and use it. The best thing about Chromebooks is the quick bootup which is around 8 seconds and the fact they just work. Printing using a USB cable isn't going to work, so you'll need Google's cloud printing and hope your printer supports it.

Pros:

Very quick, simple, can be used offline which is quite Michael Caine as not a lot of people know that. You might get Linux working, so can be made in to a cheap quick Linux laptop.

Cons:

No Skype, Not compatible with many printers, can't run any Windows software at all.

If you've got Windows 8 and Google Chrome installed then you can try out the Chrome OS experience by going to the top right icon that looks like three horizontal lines and selecting "Relaunch Chrome in Windows 8 mode" then you can try out the Chromebook experience for nothing to see if you like it.

You could get any printer working fine if you have a computer in the house running Linux/Windows/Mac OS that stays on most of the time, or you could do what I've done and buy a Raspberry Pi and use that to make the printer available to the Chromebook 24/7, even remotely. Plus it's tiny and just sits behind the printer.
1 Like #22
using hp chromebook 14 inch works great for me.
#23
can you upgrade this at all RAM HDD?
2 Likes #24
barkinglama
can you upgrade this at all RAM HDD?
You don't need to.
3 Likes #25
I have a Acer Chromebook and it hands down the best experience I have had with a computer/laptop. And I have used Macbooks and Windows for years.

It's such a great, speedy, fluid operating system and works perfectly.

Anyone that joins the Chromebook community is in for a treat.
2 Likes #26
Another bonus is that these devices are silent, and in this hot weather you'll appreciate the fact they don't have a fan blowing hot air around the room.
2 Likes #27
I now use a chromebook and don't think I'll ever use anything else ever again. Has internet. Internet and internet. Bloody brilliant for the price. Also have the moto g so I'm all kitted out with the latest tech for £300. Love google. Heat from me
#28
funkimon
barkinglama
can you upgrade this at all RAM HDD?
You don't need to.

But can you?
1 Like #29
How does this compare to the HP Chromebook 14?
1 Like #30
coming from Macbook/Windows/Linux/Chromebook user.
since getting chromebook i have rarely used the other platforms. does most of the stuff that most people use it for. also streamed movies with hdmi lead as well. used windows in between for fixing android phones. used Mac for some other stuff, and linux for few things. But mostly been using the chromebook and works very well for most stuff
switches and starts quicker than any other laptop and if in a hurry its the fastest and easiest to use and is the most used by me
#31
josephmccowie
fishmaster
Chromebooks are awesome. They work for the tasks that so many people use everyday, which is web browsing and social media. You can't Skype though which could be a big problem for some people but you can use Google Hangouts, which in some ways is better than Skype, you just have to convince the other parties you normally Skype to setup and use it. The best thing about Chromebooks is the quick bootup which is around 8 seconds and the fact they just work. Printing using a USB cable isn't going to work, so you'll need Google's cloud printing and hope your printer supports it.

Pros:

Very quick, simple, can be used offline which is quite Michael Caine as not a lot of people know that. You might get Linux working, so can be made in to a cheap quick Linux laptop.

Cons:

No Skype, Not compatible with many printers, can't run any Windows software at all.

If you've got Windows 8 and Google Chrome installed then you can try out the Chrome OS experience by going to the top right icon that looks like three horizontal lines and selecting "Relaunch Chrome in Windows 8 mode" then you can try out the Chromebook experience for nothing to see if you like it.

You could get any printer working fine if you have a computer in the house running Linux/Windows/Mac OS that stays on most of the time, or you could do what I've done and buy a Raspberry Pi and use that to make the printer available to the Chromebook 24/7, even remotely. Plus it's tiny and just sits behind the printer.

Good suggestions, although my comments were made as general comments of which the general consumer would need to be aware of and not have the technical savvy to get around the issue using your suggestions or may not even want to go to those lengths.
#32
The free 100gb cloud storage was not available on the toshiba chromebooks.
#33
barkinglama
funkimon
barkinglama
can you upgrade this at all RAM HDD?
You don't need to.

But can you?

No. I use a small usb drive this one (which sticks out a little) and a 128gb SD card which sits flush. An adequate solution for me, though I no doubt others will want more. I was going to go for a macbook air, but at £200 the chromebook is a bargain.
#34
lilacjumper
The free 100gb cloud storage was not available on the toshiba chromebooks.
Yes it was/is. I have it.
#35
lilacjumper
The free 100gb cloud storage was not available on the toshiba chromebooks.

It is now :) (if it ever wasn't)

Edited By: josephmccowie on Jul 28, 2014 20:31
#36
eatmorefish
barkinglama
funkimon
barkinglama
can you upgrade this at all RAM HDD?
You don't need to.

But can you?

No. I use a small usb drive this one (which sticks out a little) and a 128gb SD card which sits flush. An adequate solution for me, though I no doubt others will want more. I was going to go for a macbook air, but at £200 the chromebook is a bargain.

Pity would need 250GB myself
#37
eatmorefish
lilacjumper
The free 100gb cloud storage was not available on the toshiba chromebooks.
Yes it was/is. I have it.

me too
#38
fishmaster
josephmccowie
fishmaster
Chromebooks are awesome. They work for the tasks that so many people use everyday, which is web browsing and social media. You can't Skype though which could be a big problem for some people but you can use Google Hangouts, which in some ways is better than Skype, you just have to convince the other parties you normally Skype to setup and use it. The best thing about Chromebooks is the quick bootup which is around 8 seconds and the fact they just work. Printing using a USB cable isn't going to work, so you'll need Google's cloud printing and hope your printer supports it.

Pros:

Very quick, simple, can be used offline which is quite Michael Caine as not a lot of people know that. You might get Linux working, so can be made in to a cheap quick Linux laptop.

Cons:

No Skype, Not compatible with many printers, can't run any Windows software at all.

If you've got Windows 8 and Google Chrome installed then you can try out the Chrome OS experience by going to the top right icon that looks like three horizontal lines and selecting "Relaunch Chrome in Windows 8 mode" then you can try out the Chromebook experience for nothing to see if you like it.

You could get any printer working fine if you have a computer in the house running Linux/Windows/Mac OS that stays on most of the time, or you could do what I've done and buy a Raspberry Pi and use that to make the printer available to the Chromebook 24/7, even remotely. Plus it's tiny and just sits behind the printer.

Good suggestions, although my comments were made as general comments of which the general consumer would need to be aware of and not have the technical savvy to get around the issue using your suggestions or may not even want to go to those lengths.

Yeah - I get you. My comment was worded a bit like I was criticising what you said but you're absolutely right, granddad isn't going to go to those lengths X)
#39
Shame you cant install itunes on these, need a decent smallish laptop
#40
How does the screen compare to the HP 11 Chromebook?

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