Toshiba Regza 32AV615DB 32-inch Widescreen HD Ready LCD TV with Freeview - £279.99 Delivered @ Amazon - HotUKDeals
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Toshiba Regza 32AV615DB 32-inch Widescreen HD Ready LCD TV with Freeview - £279.99 Delivered @ Amazon

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Thanks to matt10!
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7y, 4m agoFound 7 years, 4 months ago
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#2
Is it just me, but when I view these LCD tv's in the shop the picture always looks a bit crinkly with ditortion around peoples faces and things in close up, could it be the signal used by the shops or is it just that is what LCD's are like? I am looking to buy my first Flat panel LCD tv but my old widescreen bush always looks a crisper picture than these new ones in the shop?! It is a dilemma for me!
#3
Just checked Play.com

They are selling this for £329.99 delivered http://www.play.com/Electronics/Electronics/4-/9481062/-/Product.html?searchstring=32AV615DB&searchsource=0

and you get a Toshiba SD-390 Upscaling DVD Player worth £49.99 for free http://www.play.com/Electronics/Electronics/4-/9545413/Toshiba-SD-390-Upscaling-DVD-Player/Product.html

Interesting! :thumbsup:
#4
boonergooner
Is it just me, but when I view these LCD tv's in the shop the picture always looks a bit crinkly with ditortion around peoples faces and things in close up, could it be the signal used by the shops or is it just that is what LCD's are like? I am looking to buy my first Flat panel LCD tv but my old widescreen bush always looks a crisper picture than these new ones in the shop?! It is a dilemma for me!


Couple of possibilities:
1. Most TVs ship in a demo mode that puts every setting on 11, to catch your eye. At more reasonable settings you get flesh coloured skin again and it's not lit up like a floodlight.
2. You're standing inches away from the screen in the shop, not 10 feet away like you would at home.
3. You're used to the lower resolution and blurriness of your CRT - the imprecision of CRT displays softens out the rough edges of the image and makes it appear less blocky.
#5
bobbyzero
Couple of possibilities:
1. Most TVs ship in a demo mode that puts every setting on 11, to catch your eye. At more reasonable settings you get flesh coloured skin again and it's not lit up like a floodlight.
2. You're standing inches away from the screen in the shop, not 10 feet away like you would at home.
3. You're used to the lower resolution and blurriness of your CRT - the imprecision of CRT displays softens out the rough edges of the image and makes it appear less blocky.


Thanks for that, so this tv will be a definite improvement to what i've got? I didn't went to change my telly just to save space and be trendy?!
#6
boonergooner
Thanks for that, so this tv will be a definite improvement to what i've got? I didn't went to change my telly just to save space and be trendy?!


The picture quality may not be as good as your older CRT, the real benefit with LCDs is their slim build and their ability to display HD content, subject to using HD equipment of course.
#7
Inactive
The picture quality may not be as good as your older CRT, the real benefit with LCDs is their slim build and their ability to display HD content, subject to using HD equipment of course.


Ahh, I have no plans to be viewing any HD for the foreseeable future, just normal sky channels and DVD. How much would I need to spend to get one with similar picture quality to my older CRT? Or can't you?
3 Likes #8
boonergooner
Ahh, I have no plans to be viewing any HD for the foreseeable future, just normal sky channels and DVD. How much would I need to spend to get one with similar picture quality to my older CRT? Or can't you?


The actual reason why a standard definition feed looks poor on an LCD screen is that the PAL resolution of 720 x 576 cannot be mapped directly to a higher resolution LCD screen. Upscaling is used (this term is incorrectly described as smoothening the pictures by others but more of this later). A picture is upscaled by extrapolating the pixels using simple trigonometry. So for a picture that needs to fit on a screen that has twice the resolution, the jaggedness of the edges become twice as enhanced.

In order for a PAL feed to be displayed on a screen with higher resolution, then upscaling is combined with pre and post processing (this is incorrectly described as upscaling by others). Pre and post processing use edge detection algorithms (such as Bresenham's line and circle algorithms) to sharpen and enhance the picture. You will need an LCD TV that performs such processing in order to watch PAL feeds that can match the standards of CRT screens. This does add at least £100 to the cost of the TV and budget models almost certainly do not possess pre and post processing.

Another option is to use a computer connected to the LCD screen since it is possible to use software such as ffdShow to process the picture given by a computer's TV tuner.
#9
I bought this tv 2 weeks ago off amazon when it was £300 and i've got to say,what a buy!

The picture quality is superb after about 5 minutes adjustment and the sound quality is also very good but i use a surround sound system so dont use that.

Anyways,all in all,if you're looking for a good 32' LCD HDTV,this is the one.Just wish i'b bought it 2 weeks later for £20 less
#10
Toshiba. Wonderful TVs.

We've had a 32" LCD for two years, and absolutely satisfied.

And just looked up the receipt. Two years ago, we paid £670 for that Toshiba 32" and thought we had a bargain! And that was just two years ago!
#13
Is this 720p?
#14
ElliottC
The actual reason why a standard definition feed looks poor on an LCD screen is that the PAL resolution of 720 x 576 cannot be mapped directly to a higher resolution LCD screen. Upscaling is used (this term is incorrectly described as smoothening the pictures by others but more of this later). A picture is upscaled by extrapolating the pixels using simple trigonometry. So for a picture that needs to fit on a screen that has twice the resolution, the jaggedness of the edges become twice as enhanced.


This is what confuses me. The site says "1366 X 768 pixels screen resolution" so doesn't that mean that scaling is also used with 720 and 1080 HD sources?
#15
Abvance
Is this 720p?


720p and 1080i (not Full HD 1080p)
#16
ElliottC
The actual reason why a standard definition feed looks poor on an LCD screen is that the PAL resolution of 720 x 576 cannot be mapped directly to a higher resolution LCD screen. Upscaling is used (this term is incorrectly described as smoothening the pictures by others but more of this later). A picture is upscaled by extrapolating the pixels using simple trigonometry. So for a picture that needs to fit on a screen that has twice the resolution, the jaggedness of the edges become twice as enhanced.

In order for a PAL feed to be displayed on a screen with higher resolution, then upscaling is combined with pre and post processing (this is incorrectly described as upscaling by others). Pre and post processing use edge detection algorithms (such as Bresenham's line and circle algorithms) to sharpen and enhance the picture. You will need an LCD TV that performs such processing in order to watch PAL feeds that can match the standards of CRT screens. This does add at least £100 to the cost of the TV and budget models almost certainly do not possess pre and post processing.

Another option is to use a computer connected to the LCD screen since it is possible to use software such as ffdShow to process the picture given by a computer's TV tuner.


Great post repped! just wondering does my 32v4000 Sony have pre and post processing as it's not mentioned in lcd tv descriptions. Also how come my nastry brand 5 year old 720p plasma still display better quality SD picture than my lcd tv?
#17
Due to the nature of plasma screens, they often imitate the quality of CRT screens. This is mainly due to how they produce a picture and also the fact that the outer layer of the screen is glass. A TFT shows a picture in a much different way than a plasma and its outer layer is matte so there is no chance for the colours it shows to bleed together slightly. A little like printing a picture on your printer on gloss and then ordinary paper. The glossy print looks more appealing than the standard paper print as the ink bleeds ever so slightly on the gloss paper and fuses the strict dots of colour together.

Also, in reply to one of the original posts, apart from the well explained description as to why the pictures can look crispy on in store display tv's, it can often be down to the input source. Find a big tv with a cruddy picture in a store and then look rou d the back. More often than not the feed is coming from a coaxial arial cable. This is because a lot of stores still have this set up from when they used to sell CRT tv's and haven't bothered upgrading their multi display system to scart or hdmi. I bet if you find a tv with a good picture, the feed is coming from a hdmi source and cable. More likely than not, if you got the tv with the cruddy picture home and hooked it up with a scart cable from your DVD player it would look way better than in the store.

But do keep in mind, any TFT screen will not be forgiving and show any and all picture defects on the source be it a DVD or freeview box. Also, different DVDs have been made using poor transfers and this can also help a picure look poor. I watched an episode of quantum leaptonigh on my crttv and even then I could see lots of compression artefacts. Most likely because the transfer for the DVD was taken from a broadcast version and not from the original film print.

This is why you get people harpng on about certain films looking great on blu ray. Some films have been transferred fromthe source material and just look fabulous. Ie. Pixar films. Watch wall e on HD tv running from a blu ray player. It's immense!

So keep in mind it's all to do with the source, the player, the connection AND the tv when it comes to picture quality non just the tv. It amuses me how muddled things are when it comes o flat screen tv's and HD. Although it's not suprising as it's a business and there is a
lot of stuff for shops to hide behind when it comes to making you buy one. If only people knew it's not as straight forward as Reading "HD ready" plastered across a screen In a shop. Talk about selling ice to Eskimos!
#18
its £289.99 now? can anyone still get it for 279?
#19
Price still £279.99
#20
matlane
This is what confuses me. The site says "1366 X 768 pixels screen resolution" so doesn't that mean that scaling is also used with 720 and 1080 HD sources?


There is a good reason for the 1366 x 768 resolution. This equates to the binary equivalent of 1 million - that is 1 megapixel (1024 x 1024). Manufacturing the panels is easier by having an exact 1 megapixel matrix.

Now 720p sources will be displayed with black bars at the top and bottom since the 720 vertical pixels will not entirely fill the vertical display. Some TVs will have a stretch mode to completely fill the vertical display but this will distort the aspect ratio ever so slightly which will be barely noticeable. Since the definition is very high and the transformation from 720 to 768 pixels is a small transformation, there is very little requirement for processing of the picture.

Displaying a 1080 source requires reducing the picture to fit onto 720 pixels (or 768 if the TV supports the option to stretch a 720p picture to 768 vertical resolution). Obviously, this type of reduction results in loss of pixels. Again trignonometric calculations are used to perform the reduction.
#21
kobirulali
Great post repped! just wondering does my 32v4000 Sony have pre and post processing as it's not mentioned in lcd tv descriptions. Also how come my nastry brand 5 year old 720p plasma still display better quality SD picture than my lcd tv?


One thing to bear in mind is the technology involved. LCD TVs use a backlight that is constantly on. In order to show blacks, the pixels involved are covered to block out the backlight. Of course, blocking light inevitably leads to some seepage of light and therefore, we do not have true blacks. Plasma displays can individually switch off pixels, henceforth their contrast is superior to those of LCD TVs. Note that Organic LED (NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH LED TVs) addresses these issues but OLED TVs are very expensive and only available in small sizes (despite their lower manufacturing costs).

Processing of the image is normally specified by some namby pamby name by the manufacturers (they call them Motion Enhancement, Pixel Perfection or some other weird name). The naming is meaningless to the consumer because most consumers do not know what it is but will think "ooh, fancy sounding name - it must be good". The fact is that the naming does NOT specify HOW the picture is processed or how good the processing is. Only by looking at standard definition feeds can one decide how good the processing is (as you have pointed out with the comparison between your flat screen TVs).

Some manufacturers do not advertise processing in their main specifications at all because they prefer to underline the HD qualities of the TV.
#22
Guessing you don't get the free stand with this one?? Really want the TV, need a cheap stand to go with it, anyone seen one that looks ok? :thinking:
[mod]#23


have some heat :thumbsup:
#24
I have a Tosh 42" 1080p had it for about 4 month's now and well pleased with the brand and the tv well worth the buy at this price :) have some heat.
#26
Had an eye on this TV for couple of weeks, i have a feeling price will be back over £300 soon, then back down again for bank holiday at end of August.

Ordered yesterday from Dixons, with 3% cashback from TopCashBack.

:-D
#27
Gone up again by a tenner, hope it comes down tomorrow as I was on the brink of ordering !
#28
Anyone know if there is any difference to the one from play with the stand?

Is this one got a gloss black finish?
#29
mercurystar999

Is this one got a gloss black finish?


Yes, very much like the Samsung LCD. If you go into a big Asda they actually stock this model (for £385.00)

:thumbsup:

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