TP-Link 5-Port 10/100 Unmanaged Mini Desktop Switch - £5.79 @ Amazon - HotUKDeals
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Not the best switch in the world, But a good price and will do the job.

TL-SF1005D 5-port 10/100Mbps Fast Ethernet Switch provides 5 10/100Mbps Auto-Negotiation RJ45 ports. All ports support Auto MDI/MDIX function, eliminating the need for crossover cables or Uplink ports. The Switch is Plug-and-Play and each port can be used as general ports or Uplink ports and can be simply plugged into a server, a hub or a switch, using straight cable or crossover cable.The TP-LINK TL-SF1005D 5-port 10/100M Fast Ethernet Switch provides you with a low-cost, easy-to-use, high-performance, seamless and standard upgrade to improve your old network to a 100Mbps network. It will boost your network performance up to full duplex data transfer. Its wire-speed switching that forwards packets can be as fast as the speed that your network delivers those packets to them.
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#1
Looking at the specs elswehere it seems this has reasonably intelligent power managment - which means it shouldnt be too expensive to run - some cheap switches are so expensive to run that they actually don't work out cheap at all. Given all of that then if 5ports without gigabit is all you need this is incredibly good value.

http://www.tp-link.com/en/products/prodetail.aspx?id=844&mid=0103030403

Incidentally the (also power saving) gigabit version is only £12.99 as well

http://www.amazon.co.uk/TP-Link-Gigabit-Unmanaged-Desktop-TL-SG1005D/dp/B000N99BBC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1305575756&sr=1-1
#2
Hot if you don't need gigabit.
#3
i've got this and have no problems what so ever with it, got my powerline adapter hooked upto it then have my PC and 360 connected
#4
cheap and furious! :)
4 Likes #5
Personally I wouldn't buy a new switch without Gigabit. The Gigabit version is £13.

This is very cheap though so if you really can't afford the £7.20 it's a good idea.
2 Likes #6
Been this price for ages and ages - very nice switch - small and neat and does it's job.

I have this as a hub for my AV equipment in the lounge (media player, Blu-ray and TV); as none of that can support gigabit it's ideal. I have an ethernet cable from the lounge to my 10/100 adsl router in my office but this would work well with powerline adapters too.

alasrati
Personally I wouldn't buy a new switch without Gigabit. The Gigabit version is £13.

This is very cheap though so if you really can't afford the £7.20 it's a good idea.


In many situations a gigabit switch is wasted. As I've said none of my AV equipment can make use of gigabit; similarly if folks are connecting this to a powerline adapter even the 200mbs versions won't make use of it (they have 10/100 etherrnet connections).

I was going to use the gigabit version to link my ReadyNAS (office) to laptop (lounge) at gigabit speeds but decided that would be a waste of money as I'd need two the ReadyNAS can only manage around 18MBs speeds and I can get 12MBs over 10/100 anyway.



Edited By: wombat6025 on May 16, 2011 22:39
#7
only comes with a euro 2 pin plug!
#8
Use with a shaver plug - about 50p in Tescos
1 Like #9
It actually come with a UK plug, there was a batch a while ago that shipped with eu plugs, however the current ones are uk plugs.
#10
what does this thing do ?
#11
Yeah, I'm a little unsure about the point of these? Are they just a hub of ethernet points so that you can connect multiple devices in a room through ethernet even though there is only one cable in the room form the router?
1 Like #12
Bomster
Yeah, I'm a little unsure about the point of these? Are they just a hub of ethernet points so that you can connect multiple devices in a room through ethernet even though there is only one cable in the room form the router?


Essentially yeah, although Switches and Hubs are different. basically, hubs copy the info coming in on one port, to every port on the device, including the incoming port blindly, and a switch asks each device attatched to it who it is, and only essentially connects the source and destination ports, making the connection a little more intelligent than a blind copy.
#13
So I could use this to copy data from PC > Mac or PC > PC?

And also I could use it to split the 1 Ethernet Network Port I have in my office into 3 for: PC, PS3 and TV?
1 Like #14
skweezer
It actually come with a UK plug, there was a batch a while ago that shipped with eu plugs, however the current ones are uk plugs.


You are correct - I bought mine from Amazon a week ago and it had a UK plug.

azocarbo
So I could use this to copy data from PC > Mac or PC > PC?

And also I could use it to split the 1 Ethernet Network Port I have in my office into 3 for: PC, PS3 and TV?


Yes.

Edited By: wombat6025 on May 17, 2011 02:51
#15
I bought 2 gigabit ones a while back and they had EU plugs so its a gamble with that, i think even if your devices cant use gigabit you would still be best to get one as more and more stuff is moving over to it and most people already have the infrastructure in there homes without even knowing, its a minimum of CAT5E cabling. If you buy these down the line you will be buying the gigabit ones and with them being cheap you would be best to get those.
#16
Cat 5 is capable of gigabit just fine
most Cat 3 will work fine as well
as they are over designed

I hard wired my whole house in 1999 with cat 5
and i get 850mbit just fine in udp tests



Edited By: Shonk on May 17, 2011 03:15
#17
wombat6025
Been this price for ages and ages - very nice switch - small and neat and does it's job.

I have this as a hub for my AV equipment in the lounge (media player, Blu-ray and TV); as none of that can support gigabit it's ideal. I have an ethernet cable from the lounge to my 10/100 adsl router in my office but this would work well with powerline adapters too.

alasrati
Personally I wouldn't buy a new switch without Gigabit. The Gigabit version is £13.

This is very cheap though so if you really can't afford the £7.20 it's a good idea.


In many situations a gigabit switch is wasted. As I've said none of my AV equipment can make use of gigabit; similarly if folks are connecting this to a powerline adapter even the 200mbs versions won't make use of it (they have 10/100 etherrnet connections).

I was going to use the gigabit version to link my ReadyNAS (office) to laptop (lounge) at gigabit speeds but decided that would be a waste of money as I'd need two the ReadyNAS can only manage around 18MBs speeds and I can get 12MBs over 10/100 anyway.




wrong re: homeplug av @ 200mpbs, they use duplex so are 'up to' 200mpbs....also newer homeplug av plugs are now using gigabit, though rated at 500mpbs

but if only for internet then for the short term only the chosen few and companies will benefit with gigabit.

been using netgear powerline and homeplug av for years - gave up on wireless for anything heavy duty



Edited By: royals on May 17, 2011 03:38: e
#18
royals
wrong re: homeplug av @ 200mpbs, they use duplex so are 'up to' 200mpbs....also newer homeplug av plugs are now using gigabit, though rated at 500mpbs

but if only for internet then for the short term only the chosen few and companies will benefit with gigabit.

been using netgear powerline and homeplug av for years - gave up on wireless for anything heavy duty



Thanks for the correction re. homeplug - must admit I didn't know 500mbps plugs were available; I'd heard that it was rare to get close to 200mbs in practice which is why I ran a cat 6 cable.
#19
Bought one of these for the office last week. It was surprising very small in size, however it is the cheapest I could source, even cheaper than what you can get on Buy it Now on ebay.
#20
Shonk
Cat 5 is capable of gigabit just fine
most Cat 3 will work fine as well
as they are over designed

For cat5 it depends on the number of cable pairs whether it can get to gbit speeds, cat3 is mainly 10baset with the possibility of 100baset. Nothing I've ever seen said it's capable of gbit.
Lately the defining reason is often the quality of the copper - with a load of cheap crap from china meaning even cat5e cables are stuck at 10/100.
#21
wombat6025
royals
wrong re: homeplug av @ 200mpbs, they use duplex so are 'up to' 200mpbs....also newer homeplug av plugs are now using gigabit, though rated at 500mpbs

but if only for internet then for the short term only the chosen few and companies will benefit with gigabit.

been using netgear powerline and homeplug av for years - gave up on wireless for anything heavy duty



Thanks for the correction re. homeplug - must admit I didn't know 500mbps plugs were available; I'd heard that it was rare to get close to 200mbs in practice which is why I ran a cat 6 cable.


Belkin do a 1Gb homeplug, although reading the reviews - they haven't done a particularly good job of it :o/
Give it a year and gigabit homeplugs will be mainstream.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Belkin-Powerline-1000Mbps-Streaming-F5D4076uk/dp/B00267Q3SI
#22
alasrati
Personally I wouldn't buy a new switch without Gigabit. The Gigabit version is £13.
Agreed. And fast ethernet switches have been on clearance around 5 pounds for at least a year, so I don't see the deal. I got one for 6 pounds with two 10 meter cables not long ago.
#23
Shonk
Cat 5 is capable of gigabit just fine

No, you need Cat 5e for gigabit. Gigabit has a few other restrictions, for example you can only connect two short and one long cable (with the long cable supposedly installed in the building, and the short ones being patch cables).

If you only use one short patch cable, you can probably get away with Cat 5, and maybe even with Cat 3. But I see no reason to experiment there, because Cat 5e patch cables are not expensive any more.
#24
Sorry if I seem a bit dim but I still don't quite understand what this is. Does it speed up internet usage somehow?
#25
nice price
2 Likes #26
Carnivac
Sorry if I seem a bit dim but I still don't quite understand what this is. Does it speed up internet usage somehow?


Won't speed up your internet, but will allow you to share an internet connection among computers, and/or to interconnect computers locally. There is probably a four-port switch built in to your internet router, and if you don't need more than 4 connections you probably don't need this.

However, by connecting this to a port on your router you gain an additional 4 connections, and it can be useful if you have (for example) one cable from your router to (say) upstairs, where you could connect this and run shorter cables to kids bedrooms etc rather than running multiple long cable runs.
#27
MrPuddington

No, you need Cat 5e for gigabit.


No. IEEE 802.3ab is the standard for gigabit over copper, and specifies category 5, 5e, or 6 cabling as suitable.
#28
xenny
MrPuddington

No, you need Cat 5e for gigabit.


No. IEEE 802.3ab is the standard for gigabit over copper, and specifies category 5, 5e, or 6 cabling as suitable.


You're correct you can get gigabit speeds over Cat5 cable; if you're buying new get cat5e or Cat6. Since not all Cat5 cables will support gigabit you may have to replace those cables but if you're on a shoestring budget or replacing a cable would be a lot of effort you can wait to see how your Cat5 perform.
#29
Got one of these in the living room - powering an xbox, ps3, telly and WD Live. No need for gigabit in that scenario. Think I've maxed out my homeplugs at 40Mbs anyway when I last did network testing which is fine for any of the living room applications.
#30
I doubt you can even get cable thats cat 5 anymore
Im just stating that cat5e isnt required
i have had gigabit running on cat5 around my house since 2000
its just fine
infact its far better quality than alot of cat6 stuff you buy these days

what do you think isp's ran gigabit over before cat5e came out
cat5!!!

MrPuddington
Shonk
Cat 5 is capable of gigabit just fine

No, you need Cat 5e for gigabit. Gigabit has a few other restrictions, for example you can only connect two short and one long cable (with the long cable supposedly installed in the building, and the short ones being patch cables).

If you only use one short patch cable, you can probably get away with Cat 5, and maybe even with Cat 3. But I see no reason to experiment there, because Cat 5e patch cables are not expensive any more.
#31
Each of the four pairs in a Cat 5 cable has differing precise number of twists per metre based on prime numbers to minimize crosstalk between the pairs. On average there are 6 twists per 5 centimetres. The pairs are made from 24 gauge (AWG) copper wires within the cables.[citation needed] Although, cable assemblies containing 4 pairs are common, Category 5[2] is not limited to 4 pairs. Backbone applications involve using up to 100 pairs.[3] This use of balanced lines helps preserve a high signal-to-noise ratio despite interference from both external sources and crosstalk from other pairs. Category 5 cabling is most commonly used for faster Ethernet networks, such as 100BASE-TX and 1000BASE-T.

10BASE-T and 100BASE-TX Ethernet connections require two cable pairs. 1000BASE-T Ethernet connections require four cable pairs.
#32
1000BASE-T
1000BASE-T capable network interface card made by Intel, which connects to the computer via PCI-X

1000BASE-T (also known as IEEE 802.3ab) is a standard for gigabit Ethernet over copper wiring.

Each 1000BASE-T network segment can be a maximum length of 100 meters (328 feet), and must use Category 5 cable or better. Category 5e cable or Category 6 cable may also be used.

Autonegotiation is a requirement for using 1000BASE-T[7] according to Section 28D.5 Extensions required for Clause40 (1000BASE-T).[8] At least the clock source has to be negotiated, as one has to be master and the other slave.

In a departure from both 10BASE-T and 100BASE-TX, 1000BASE-T uses all four cable pairs for simultaneous transmission in both directions through the use of echo cancellation and a 5-level pulse amplitude modulation (PAM-5) technique. The symbol rate is identical to that of 100BASE-TX (125 Mbaud) and the noise immunity of the 5-level signaling is also identical to that of the 3-level signaling in 100BASE-TX, since 1000BASE-T uses 4-dimensional trellis coded modulation (TCM) to achieve a 6 dB coding gain across the 4 pairs.

If two gigabit devices are connected through a cable with two pairs only, negotiation takes place on two pairs only, so the devices successfully choose 'gigabit' as the highest common denominator (HCD), but the link never comes up. Most gigabit physical devices have a specific register to diagnose this behaviour. Some drivers offer an "[email protected]" option where this situation leads to a slower yet functional connection.[9]

The data is transmitted over four copper pairs, eight bits at a time. First, eight bits of data are expanded into four 3-bit symbols through a non-trivial scrambling procedure based on a linear feedback shift register; this is similar to what is done in 100BASE-T2, but uses different parameters. The 3-bit symbols are then mapped to voltage levels which vary continuously during transmission. One example mapping is as follows:
#33
Shonk - You've been reading the specification book again. Haven't you! Naughty boy! ;)

P.S. All my cabling is Belkin CAT6.
#34
blacklion1725
Carnivac
Sorry if I seem a bit dim but I still don't quite understand what this is. Does it speed up internet usage somehow?


Won't speed up your internet, but will allow you to share an internet connection among computers, and/or to interconnect computers locally. There is probably a four-port switch built in to your internet router, and if you don't need more than 4 connections you probably don't need this.

However, by connecting this to a port on your router you gain an additional 4 connections, and it can be useful if you have (for example) one cable from your router to (say) upstairs, where you could connect this and run shorter cables to kids bedrooms etc rather than running multiple long cable runs.



Ah ok thanks for the reply. I don't think I do need it then. I already run my PS3 and laptop from the same router without any trouble. I don't have much else that uses internet.
#35
Gonk, did you copy and paste all that from Wikipedia to try and mask the fact you said Cat3 would run gigabit too?
#36
oh look...

Category 3 cable, commonly known as Cat 3, is an unshielded twisted pair (UTP) cable designed to reliably carry data up to 10 Mbit/s, with a possible bandwidth of 16 MHz. It is part of a family of copper cabling standards defined jointly by the Electronic Industries Alliance and the Telecommunications Industry Association.

Category 3 was a popular cabling format among computer network administrators in the early 1990s, but fell out of popularity in favor of the very similar, but higher performing, Category 5 cable standard. Since the early 2000s most new structured cable installations are built with Cat 5e or Cat 6 cable.

Cat 3 is currently still in use in two-line telephone systems. It may be used for 10BASE-T Ethernet, token ring, or ATM25 networks. The seldom used 100BASE-T4 standard, which achieves speeds of 100 Mbit/s by using all 4 pairs of wires, allowed older Cat 3 based infrastructures to achieve a much higher bandwidth
#37
Maybe just a sole mistake where I'm concerned, but I received the Gigabit TL-SG1005D version! :D

Anyone else?
#38
Luck you ^
Received mine today, got the SF1005D, the one i ordered.

Just plugged in and works a treat. So im happy. :)
#39
Has anyone who bought one of these checked how power efficient they actually are? I'm currently running an old 8-port 10/100 switch and it's working fine, but according to my power meter it's costing around 20p per day to run. If these are suitably efficient it may be worth switching to.
#40
wibbleboy
Has anyone who bought one of these checked how power efficient they actually are? I'm currently running an old 8-port 10/100 switch and it's working fine, but according to my power meter it's costing around 20p per day to run. If these are suitably efficient it may be worth switching to.

On the box it says 'saves power up to 60%'.

Their website says 70%!
http://www.tp-link.com/en/products/prodetail.aspx?mid=0103030403&id=844

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