UE40C5100Q LED HD 1080p Digital Television, 40 Inch LED £699 & 5 Year Guarantee @ John Lewis - HotUKDeals
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UE40C5100Q LED TV + 5 Year Guarantee

This stunning Samsung UE40C5100Q LED TV combines a great picture with exceptionally slim design.

LED lights use much less energy than standard LCD and offer more precise control of colour, contrast and clarity. And as the LEDs are positioned on the side of the screen, it allows for a depth of less than 3cm.

There are 4 HDMI connections which will allow you to connect to HD sources such as blu-ray players, consoles, set-top boxes and camcorders. You can also connect digital devices via USB to display photos and video.

The UE40C5100Q is also DLNA (Digital Living Network Alliance) compatible. This enables you to access your photos, music and movies from a compatible device - such as your PC - across your home network. For instance, you could play your friends the latest MP3 track youve just downloaded, even though your computer is upstairs in the spare bedroom. With standard Freeview tuner.
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suspended#1
Not Freeview HD
#2
mikbak
Not Freeview HD


no freeview HD but its a good price, freeview HD costs £100 at argos
http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/5322408.htm
#3
If you are happy to live with the following go for it:

1. Because it is an LCD TV, when you are watching movies you are likely to be disappointed. Although the pictures are very sharp, movies appear as though they have been recorded for TV, like a soap-opera; a bit like camcorder recording I suppose is the best way to describe it. This is also partly due to how the blacks are crushed and it reduces the depth of field and you feel as though the characters are cardboard cut-outs.
2. For games, you will suffer motion blur.
3. You may suffer from 'coning'.
4. You will certainly suffer from backlight bleed/flashlighting.
5. You will certainly suffer from clouding/shadowing (a small ball sized cloud of grey on black screen or scene).
6. The blacks are deep but shades of black (black-grey-white) are less defined and you lose shadow details.

Haven't voted either way.
#4
tpol
If you are happy to live with the following go for it:

1. Because it is an LCD TV, when you are watching movies you are likely to be disappointed. Although the pictures are very sharp, movies appear as though they have been recorded for TV, like a soap-opera; a bit like camcorder recording I suppose is the best way to describe it. This is also partly due to how the blacks are crushed and it reduces the depth of field and you feel as though the characters are cardboard cut-outs.
2. For games, you will suffer motion blur.
3. You may suffer from 'coning'.
4. You will certainly suffer from backlight bleed/flashlighting.
5. You will certainly suffer from clouding/shadowing (a small ball sized cloud of grey on black screen or scene).
6. The blacks are deep but shades of black (black-grey-white) are less defined and you lose shadow details.

Haven't voted either way.


I reckon your being unrealistic. I don't feel like that with my le40f86. I've played games, watched HD&SD content and used it for slideshows.

I play FPS games in my PC so I know what to look for concerning motion blur.

LCD's have gotten pretty good at doing proper black with no bleeds, and almost there with detailed blacks.
#5
tpol
If you are happy to live with the following go for it:

1. Because it is an LCD TV, when you are watching movies you are likely to be disappointed. Although the pictures are very sharp, movies appear as though they have been recorded for TV, like a soap-opera; a bit like camcorder recording I suppose is the best way to describe it. This is also partly due to how the blacks are crushed and it reduces the depth of field and you feel as though the characters are cardboard cut-outs.
2. For games, you will suffer motion blur.
3. You may suffer from 'coning'.
4. You will certainly suffer from backlight bleed/flashlighting.
5. You will certainly suffer from clouding/shadowing (a small ball sized cloud of grey on black screen or scene).
6. The blacks are deep but shades of black (black-grey-white) are less defined and you lose shadow details.

Haven't voted either way.


I agree with Glix - I have the Samsung UEB407020 40" LED TV and don't recognise any of these "issues". So I'd say this is a hot deal - especially as I paid £1079 for mine 6 months ago.
#6
tpol
If you are happy to live with the following go for it:

1. Because it is an LCD TV, when you are watching movies you are likely to be disappointed. Although the pictures are very sharp, movies appear as though they have been recorded for TV, like a soap-opera; a bit like camcorder recording I suppose is the best way to describe it. This is also partly due to how the blacks are crushed and it reduces the depth of field and you feel as though the characters are cardboard cut-outs.
2. For games, you will suffer motion blur.
3. You may suffer from 'coning'.
4. You will certainly suffer from backlight bleed/flashlighting.
5. You will certainly suffer from clouding/shadowing (a small ball sized cloud of grey on black screen or scene).
6. The blacks are deep but shades of black (black-grey-white) are less defined and you lose shadow details.

Haven't voted either way.


Id agree with this, look at a decent Plasma. The G20 or S10 are excellent screens for the money.

Voted hot regardless, this is a good price for this particular panel.
#7
it should state its LED "Backlit" not full LED - but I guess one would know this based on the price
#8
Its look like good deal, forget about 'free view HD' Now a day's Sky hd box is very cheap. Thanks
#9
"The UE40C5100Q is also DLNA (Digital Living Network Alliance) compatible. This enables you to access your photos, music and movies from a compatible device - such as your PC - across your home network. For instance, you could play your friends the latest MP3 track youve just downloaded, even though your computer is upstairs in the spare bedroom. With standard Freeview tuner."

does anyone know how this work s in practise? does it have an ethernet port that i can use to connect my pc via homeplugs too?

Also - the USB connectivity - is that going to play all file formats?
#10
Guswold
I agree with Glix - I have the Samsung UEB407020 40" LED TV and don't recognise any of these "issues". So I'd say this is a hot deal - especially as I paid £1079 for mine 6 months ago.


+1

I have the same TV and have suffered none of these issues. I'm what you might like to call a TV geek so know what to look for.
#11
shine1290
Its look like good deal, forget about 'free view HD' Now a day's Sky hd box is very cheap. Thanks


lol you are of coarse joking?:,so you dont pay sky any subscription for your HD viewing:whistling: Rupert must love you:thumbsup:
#12
quizmaniac;8746382
lol you are of coarse joking?:,so you dont pay sky any subscription for your HD viewing:whistling: Rupert must love you:thumbsup:

I dont pay anything for my SKY HD pack...Free for 12months
1 Like #13
vik1
"The UE40C5100Q is also DLNA (Digital Living Network Alliance) compatible. This enables you to access your photos, music and movies from a compatible device - such as your PC - across your home network. For instance, you could play your friends the latest MP3 track youve just downloaded, even though your computer is upstairs in the spare bedroom. With standard Freeview tuner."

does anyone know how this work s in practise? does it have an ethernet port that i can use to connect my pc via homeplugs too?

Also - the USB connectivity - is that going to play all file formats?


I bought a Sony with this connection... yes they have an ethernet (CAT5) port, you run a server software on the PC, and if you have a decent PC spec, then any file format is transcoded on the fly...
I also have a USB port, but the formats are very limited - far better to plug a cable into the router !
1 Like #14
tpol
If you are happy to live with the following go for it:

1. Because it is an LCD TV, when you are watching movies you are likely to be disappointed. Although the pictures are very sharp, movies appear as though they have been recorded for TV, like a soap-opera; a bit like camcorder recording I suppose is the best way to describe it. This is also partly due to how the blacks are crushed and it reduces the depth of field and you feel as though the characters are cardboard cut-outs.
2. For games, you will suffer motion blur.
3. You may suffer from 'coning'.
4. You will certainly suffer from backlight bleed/flashlighting.
5. You will certainly suffer from clouding/shadowing (a small ball sized cloud of grey on black screen or scene).
6. The blacks are deep but shades of black (black-grey-white) are less defined and you lose shadow details.

Haven't voted either way.


2006 called, they'd like their comments back.
1 Like #15
tpol
If you are happy to live with the following go for it:

1. Because it is an LCD TV, when you are watching movies you are likely to be disappointed. Although the pictures are very sharp, movies appear as though they have been recorded for TV, like a soap-opera; a bit like camcorder recording I suppose is the best way to describe it. This is also partly due to how the blacks are crushed and it reduces the depth of field and you feel as though the characters are cardboard cut-outs.
2. For games, you will suffer motion blur.
3. You may suffer from 'coning'.
4. You will certainly suffer from backlight bleed/flashlighting.
5. You will certainly suffer from clouding/shadowing (a small ball sized cloud of grey on black screen or scene).
6. The blacks are deep but shades of black (black-grey-white) are less defined and you lose shadow details.

Haven't voted either way.


Some valid points, but certainly misleading too.

Not every panel will suffer from the points you make ( points 2-6 ) and point 1 is a new one on me based on how you have described it.

I've got an older, but still impressive, Samsung LE40A686 and have the professional calibration settings applied to each input (where possible of course). Not surprisingly, the only issues I have ever experienced that is annoying, is when any of the 100Hz processing is turned on - that is when it can look overly fluid and like it is "American" in its style.

Some panels are clearly going to suffer from issues if they are not built to high specifications, but not every LCD panel, as is insinuated.

Another point missed out on, is the fact that an LCD panel is far more suitable to use for PC input than a plasma panel. Hardly a killer, but I use mine for PC usage a lot and it was the reason I chose LCD over plasma.

It's well known that LCD/Plasma are more closely matched than ever before - and as always - users should try them out before making a purchase :thumbsup:
#16
Wicked Lester
2004 called, they'd like their comments back.


:p

That made my afternoon!
1 Like #17
thesilverfox
:p

That made my afternoon!


Lol, I thought I was doing him a bit of a disservice so changed it to 2006, just to be fair. ;-)
#18
Wicked Lester
Lol, I thought I was doing him a bit of a disservice so changed it to 2006, just to be fair. ;-)


Yeah, both panel types were not without their flaws until the last couple of years :) Still made me chuckle though.
#19
I have the Samsung UE40B7020 and have had no issues with it. I did feel there was a slight lag when playing Modern Warfare 2 but after switching it to Game mode it it was fine.

I paid around 900 bucks for mine including the 150 eco cashback Samsung were doing earlier in the year.

Voted hot.
#20
tpol
If you are happy to live with the following go for it:

1. Because it is an LCD TV, when you are watching movies you are likely to be disappointed. Although the pictures are very sharp, movies appear as though they have been recorded for TV, like a soap-opera; a bit like camcorder recording I suppose is the best way to describe it. This is also partly due to how the blacks are crushed and it reduces the depth of field and you feel as though the characters are cardboard cut-outs.
2. For games, you will suffer motion blur.
3. You may suffer from 'coning'.
4. You will certainly suffer from backlight bleed/flashlighting.
5. You will certainly suffer from clouding/shadowing (a small ball sized cloud of grey on black screen or scene).
6. The blacks are deep but shades of black (black-grey-white) are less defined and you lose shadow details.

Haven't voted either way.


1. Rubbish
2. Rubbish
3. Rubbish
4. Highly doubt this on a quality LED backlit set
5. No
6. Hmmmmm

In short when was the last time you actually looked at an LCD TV???
#21
tpol
If you are happy to live with the following go for it:

1. Because it is an LCD TV, when you are watching movies you are likely to be disappointed. Although the pictures are very sharp, movies appear as though they have been recorded for TV, like a soap-opera; a bit like camcorder recording I suppose is the best way to describe it. This is also partly due to how the blacks are crushed and it reduces the depth of field and you feel as though the characters are cardboard cut-outs.
2. For games, you will suffer motion blur.
3. You may suffer from 'coning'.
4. You will certainly suffer from backlight bleed/flashlighting.
5. You will certainly suffer from clouding/shadowing (a small ball sized cloud of grey on black screen or scene).
6. The blacks are deep but shades of black (black-grey-white) are less defined and you lose shadow details.

Haven't voted either way.


Seriously...

LCD is superior to Plasma. I have both and that is my honest opinion
#22
its a samsung, go get a proper tv, like a sony with freeview HD
#23
This is a derned good price and as for the 6 point dismissal...

You do know this is 2010? Just checking!:-D

Seriously I just had the pleasure of window shopping of several sets including top brand Plasmas and big brand LCDs (Sony and Pana) and there Sanyo LED backlit jobbies were noticeably superior to every other set in the shop. Excellent TV, excellent deal, voted HOT HOT HOT
#24
Shock
its a samsung, go get a proper tv, like a sony with freeview HD


Depends on what you want though...

Sony and Samsung are great competition to each other and probably depends on personal preference.

Freeview HD has some problems at the moment, the usual first generation teething issues, but if you don't have a 5.1 setup and can receive the signal then go ahead and get the newer sets for £300 more?
#25
anubisrich
Seriously...

LCD is superior to Plasma. I have both and that is my honest opinion


I've both too and would say plasma is the better tech. :p
#26
Rich44
1. Rubbish
2. Rubbish
3. Rubbish
4. Highly doubt this on a quality LED backlit set
5. No
6. Hmmmmm

In short when was the last time you actually looked at an LCD TV???


It's not the most fair comparison as they're two different TV's but he's right about uniformity, it's still a problem for a lot of LCD sets.

This is one of the top LED LG sets and it still suffers from it

http://www.hdtvtest.co.uk/image/hdtv/LG-42SL9000/panel-uniformity.jpg
#27
Rooster#1
I bought a Sony with this connection... yes they have an ethernet (CAT5) port, you run a server software on the PC, and if you have a decent PC spec, then any file format is transcoded on the fly...
I also have a USB port, but the formats are very limited - far better to plug a cable into the router !


wow - thats very cool - basically means that if you don't want to record (which I don't) you can stream music/films etc through your network. Thats very cool - will be getting meself one! (prob not this TV itself as looking for a cheaper bedroom set) but now will keep my eye out for one - had given up looking before as thought i'd need to get a revo to do everything that i wanted!

thanks - rep added
#28
Glix
I reckon your being unrealistic. I don't feel like that with my le40f86. I've played games, watched HD&SD content and used it for slideshows.

I play FPS games in my PC so I know what to look for concerning motion blur.

LCD's have gotten pretty good at doing proper black with no bleeds, and almost there with detailed blacks.


These panels were better overall than the current ultra-slim Samsung LCD panels with side-lit LED. There is clear lag, check the comparisons at AVForums. The main thing is if you are happy with, what does it matter.

Guswold
I agree with Glix - I have the Samsung UEB407020 40" LED TV and don't recognise any of these "issues". So I'd say this is a hot deal - especially as I paid £1079 for mine 6 months ago.


Go over to AVForums and have a look, might enlighten you.

SuperMassiveWill
+1

I have the same TV and have suffered none of these issues. I'm what you might like to call a TV geek so know what to look for.


Go over to AVForums and have a look, might enlighten you.

Wicked Lester
2006 called, they'd like their comments back.


Go over to AVForums and have a look, might enlighten you. Phil Hinton a respected AV journalist might enlighten your tiny mind.

thesilverfox
:p

That made my afternoon!


Go over to AVForums and have a look, might enlighten you. Phil Hinton a respected AV journalist might enlighten you.

Wicked Lester
Lol, I thought I was doing him a bit of a disservice so changed it to 2006, just to be fair. ;-)


Go over to AVForums and have a look, might enlighten you. Phil Hinton a respected AV journalist might enlighten your tiny mind.

Rich44
1. Rubbish (As someone who had THREE UE46B8000, I think I and hundred of others who agree with this would disagree with you. This is LCD issue, especially if side-lit LED, it is acknowledged by all AV experts, so take a chill-pill.)
2. Rubbish (see response above)
3. Rubbish (Hundreds suffered from coning and still do, educate yourself before making illiterate comments)
4. Highly doubt this on a quality LED backlit set (even Samsung acknowledge this)
5. No (It is such a common known problem, even Samsung acknowledge this, shows how much you are a know-nothing ignorant fanboy)
6. Hmmmmm

In short when was the last time you actually looked at an LCD TV???


Go over to AVForums and have a look, might enlighten you. Phil Hinton a respected AV journalist might enlighten your tiny mind.

anubisrich
Seriously...

LCD is superior to Plasma. I have both and that is my honest opinion


Ha, ha, ha. They both have their own qualities, to say LCD is superior to Plasma shows you lack the most basic brain cells.

kharma45
I've both too and would say plasma is the better tech. :p


It just goes to show how ignorant people can be. Just take a look over on AVForums and you will find many people who have suffered from one or more of the problems I have listed.

I owned THREE UE46B8000, each of them displayed two or more of the problems I have listed. Samsung Tech support acknowledged that these LCD panels that have LED side lighting will suffer these problems to a lesser or greater extent. Do you seriously think they would have replaced and refunded me without making a fuss if these issues were not real.

Live in your disillusional world if you wish, but anyone who has any knowledge and knows anything about AV will not touch a LCD TV with side-lit LED. The panels are too thin and cannot spread the light uniformly across the screen, thus causing clouding.
#29
Boxrick
Id agree with this, look at a decent Plasma. The G20 or S10 are excellent screens for the money.

Voted hot regardless, this is a good price for this particular panel.


At least someone who knows what they are talking about. Right now I wouldn't buy any TV. LCD TVs with side-lit LED are a no no. LCD TVs with full-backlit LED are an option, but have many issues and cannot match plasmas for the 'movie experience'. The only plasma I would consider is the Panasonic, but they have had too many problems with the MLL in their 2009 range; although the 2010 range is supposedly better in this respect, it is too early to take a risk.

I am looking forward to the 2011 range of Panasonics which will fully implement Pioneer Kuro technology in their panels. I would also hope by that time Sony, Samsung and Lucky Goldstar will have improved their LCD/LED offerings to remove a lot of the issues that are associated with them.

The real buzz will arrive when and/or if the manufacturers can perfect OLED technology for larger panels. There seem to have been very little progress in this area.
#30
I may not know what I am talking about :whistling: but I have left the cash in the bank for the last 5 years+ waiting, ot for tvs to get to as good a CRT nor to HD nor to LCD = Plasma or Plasma =LCD what I want is a TV that no one can find mayjor faults with and that within 6 months doesnt have its own forum complaining of the technical faults, until then I think my OLD passed down the family 28" panasonic freeview looks great and sounds good, will do me.

And OLED looks really really really good when you see one in real life even an 11" your hand will magically reack into you pocket and pull out your wallet!!! And yes you will be very happy but in truth the next step in TV isnt LED, OLED, or Plasma there are new technologies on the horizon that will blow these out of the water.

But aside from this rant I give HOT to this deal as it is a good set irespective of what people say. for the price what you get is good which I thought this forum was all about, guess i was wrong and its just a place for people to **** each other of and call each other stupid
#31
tpol

Go over to AVForums and have a look, might enlighten you.
.


Actually, I would suggest you do this too.

If you hang off every word that one single reviewer says, without forming your own opinions, then that's up to you. But I frequent AVForums regularly, thank you very much, and I am aware of what is often discussed about MANY panels, and plasma panels get their fair share of beatings too.

I take AVForums advice seriously, but I take my own experience as de facto. There are many panels that people rave about, and I don't like, for example - and vice-versa.

Let's not pretend to be an elitist know-it-all, eh? Saying people have a tiny mind because they don't agree with you is somewhat low, isn't it?

Much like 'sound' (golden ears and that lark - a farce), viewing quality and preference is subjective. You cannot say that someone is wrong for their opinion - it makes you sound like a total fanboy. I suspect that there is a good chance you could well be, but who am I to judge?

If you spout anecdotal evidence, good for you. But if multiple people here say they have the panel, and don't experience the "issues" you quote from a single thread on a single forum, I would be inclined to believe that you are in fact, incorrect. Not to mention you've probably never owned this panel or seen one - despite what you may choose to protest.

There are seemingly far too many of "your types" around here on HUKD. A little knowledge, is a very dangerous thing. Heaven forbid anyone takes your comments seriously.
#32
thesilverfox
Actually, I would suggest you do this too.

If you hang off every word that one single reviewer says, without forming your own opinions, then that's up to you. But I frequent AVForums regularly, thank you very much, and I am aware of what is often discussed about MANY panels, and plasma panels get their fair share of beatings too.

I take AVForums advice seriously, but I take my own experience as de facto. There are many panels that people rave about, and I don't like, for example - and vice-versa.

Let's not pretend to be an elitist know-it-all, eh? Saying people have a tiny mind because they don't agree with you is somewhat low, isn't it?

Much like 'sound' (golden ears and that lark - a farce), viewing quality and preference is subjective. You cannot say that someone is wrong for their opinion - it makes you sound like a total fanboy. I suspect that there is a good chance you could well be, but who am I to judge?

If you spout anecdotal evidence, good for you. But if multiple people here say they have the panel, and don't experience the "issues" you quote from a single thread on a single forum, I would be inclined to believe that you are in fact, incorrect. Not to mention you've probably never owned this panel or seen one - despite what you may choose to protest.

There are seemingly far too many of "your types" around here on HUKD. A little knowledge, is a very dangerous thing. Heaven forbid anyone takes your comments seriously.


I would have respect for anyone's opinion including yours. Unfortunately and in fact quite sadly you appear to have little knowledge. First of all the defects known as 'coning' and 'clouding' and 'edge-bleeds' are not opinions BUT facts and experience of many hundreds of people who have suffered it. It is defect common to all Samsung LCD TVs with edge-lit LED. Although some units suffer to a greater degree than others. When these issues are small most people do not notice them. THUS, the defects ARE FACTS NOT OPINIONS. In fact Samsung Tech accept these are inherent defects.

Now I am going to give you benefit of the doubt and assume you did not wish to call me a liar. Because if you did, you are much more low than I may have been making some statement.

Not that I have to justify myself to anyone, least of all you; for the benefit of the other readers of this thread, it is worthwhile to share my experience:
- I purchased my first Samsung UE46B8000 from Costco in October 2009, when Samsung had a £200 cashback offer. I was attracted to this TV because in store it certainly had the 'wow' factor. The colours were vibrant and sharp in HD and that was to be my main source.
- Having got it home, immediately (night viewing in moderate light) I noticed the 'clouding' on blacks or dark scenes; these manifested themselves in five or six places about the size of a baseball in a lighter shade of grey. There was also slight coning and some strong edge-bleed.
- I called Costco concierge service, who called Samsung tech on a conference call. Samsung accepted that there were these inherent defects and that they would send an engineer round to swap the panel. I waited for over three weeks with no sign of an engineer. In the end having got fed up waiting, I returned the TV to Costco for a replacement.
- Got the replacement home and again similar problems; the clouding was much worse. This time I didn't call Costco Concierge/Samsung Tech, but took it straight back to Costco for a replacement but they didn't have any in stock, so lugged it back home waited another three/four weeks to get a replacement.
- The third UE46B8000 from Costco, and this time there is no coning but the clouding is simply horrendous. So I call Costco concierge again. They call Samsung Tech, again the guy says, 'Yes there are these inherent defects, we will send an engineer to replace the panel'.
- Wait one week, no sign of an engineer. Call Costo, they call Samsung, who promise to send engineer.
- A few days later the engineer arrives, spends good 45 minutes looking at the panel and making lengthy notes. Tells me he is going to speak to the service engineer and then he will get back to me. Wait one week, call Costco, who call Samsung to escalate. This happens three times before I give up and return the TV for good this time.

Now some of you might think this is an isolated incident but it isn't; take a look at this thread http://www.avforums.com/forums/lcd-led-lcd-tvs/1073363-samsung-ue46b8000-part-2-a-17.html ; post 499 from user 'kinhell'. Luckily after three panels he had a good outcome. His experience and mine have been experienced by hundreds of users. Look also at post 509 from user 'mark8par'; there are numerous others.

Some people on this site have got their head stuck so far up their own lower posterior, they will dismiss real life experience, call people liars to satisfy their ego, dismiss accepted view on certain issues, dismiss known facts regarding defects as if they didn't exist.

I have never claimed that every single Samsung panel has shown these characteristics and/or defects, but there are hundreds of documented cases of problems.

In terms of the films looking cardboard like or soap like. When recently I was chatting to a sales rep at Best Buy, he was a bit surprised at my statement. It is only when we viewed the same film on a Sony LCD/LED, Samsung LCD/LED, a Panasonic plasma and a LG Plasma, he realised what I meant. He was shocked and a bit disheartened as he has a Samsung 7020 at home and thought he wouldn't be able to enjoy films without thinking he was watching Eastenders HD. The reason for this effect is simply because LCD/LED TV images are so sharp at the edges and crush the black shades, they remove the film-like effect.

Also in Best Buy, they have a 3D room set up (darkened environment), so I took the guy to have a look at the Samsung UE46C8500 that they have set up. Got him to put it on a dark screen and sure enough these 'new' generation of panels have the same 'clouding' effect; there were four grey balls in the dark areas of the screen. The LED edge-lighting simply struggles to maintain a uniform backlighting across the whole screen. So going super-thin has problems. I am sure the LCD screens with LED backlighting across the full screen (i.e. from the back) doesn't suffer these clouding problems (has others mind you but not coning or clouding one would surmise).

Going back to you 'thesilverfox', if you really frequented AV Forums as you say, you would have come across many having one or more of these problems; real-life experience from real life users; maybe you have seen them but ignoring them or indeed you are a fanboy and cannot accept the fact that LCD/LED TV do have their drawback.
#33
OMG, my eyes are now bleeding!

Shouldn't have read this, I only wanted to know if it was a 'hotukdeal'!
#34
paulynmarshall
OMG, my eyes are now bleeding!

Shouldn't have read this, I only wanted to know if it was a 'hotukdeal'!


My apologies to you paulynmarshall by making you suffer thus with my 'War and Peace' contribution.
#35
I love my Samsung 40" LED tv, excellent picture quality, buy with confidence! Bargain, I paid a grand!
#36
tpol


*snip*

Going back to you 'thesilverfox', if you really frequented AV Forums as you say, you would have come across many having one or more of these problems; real-life experience from real life users; maybe you have seen them but ignoring them or indeed you are a fanboy and cannot accept the fact that LCD/LED TV do have their drawback.


And hereing lies the kicker: I never pretended or alluded to being an expert with 'knowledge'.

I'm not calling you a liar - how could I possibly come to that conclusion? I am merely stating that in the wonderful world of the Internet and forums, people have occasionally been known to fabricate the truth, as it were. Ego or not - you can't believe everything that is written by the casual keyboard warrior.

But you did say, and I quote,

tpol
If you are happy to live with the following go for it:

1. [COLOR="Red"]Because it is an LCD TV[/COLOR], when you are watching movies you are likely to be disappointed. Although the pictures are very sharp, movies appear as though they have been recorded for TV, like a soap-opera; a bit like camcorder recording I suppose is the best way to describe it. This is also partly due to how the blacks are crushed and it reduces the depth of field and you feel as though the characters are cardboard cut-outs.
2. For games, [COLOR="Red"]you will suffer [/COLOR]motion blur.
3. You may suffer from 'coning'.
4. [COLOR="Red"]You will certainly suffer[/COLOR] from backlight bleed/flashlighting.
5. [COLOR="Red"]You will certainly suffer[/COLOR] from clouding/shadowing (a small ball sized cloud of grey on black screen or scene).
6. The blacks are deep but shades of black (black-grey-white) are less defined and you lose shadow details.

Haven't voted either way.


Please refer to my highlighted points, where you assert absolute assurance that these problems will be found, because of what you say in point number one - underlined and in red - "because it is an LCD TV".

As a result, I am finding it hard to believe that you would have purchased this panel without checking a review first and deciding not to bother with one in the first place. You suggest, or rather, proclaim you have knowledge, judging by the assurance of certainty you place on the defects of all LCD TV panels. This is why I feel your opinions carry a limited amount of credibility.

Perhaps you could have taken the approach of:

"I bought one of these without researching fully. I would advise that you don't get caught out and do your research first".

It sure beats preaching and making somewhat outlandish claims, doesn't it? As for Best Buy and many retail outlets, do you honestly trust their staff to set up and calibrate panels professionally? Hell, even Richer Sounds are meant to be half decent (apparently) and their equipment is in my experience at least, rarely set up correctly.

I doubt a single one of the larger retailers has implemented professional ISF calibration - it costs too much, and the average consumer couldn't give a monkey's.

If I had gone to purchase for example, a Kuro panel, based on how retailers have them set up, I'd never even consider one, despite the range being extremely highly regarded.

Please refer to my prior post, quoted:

thesilverfox

Some panels are clearly going to suffer from issues if they are not built to high specifications, but not every LCD panel, as is insinuated.

Another point missed out on, is the fact that an LCD panel is far more suitable to use for PC input than a plasma panel. Hardly a killer, but I use mine for PC usage a lot and it was the reason I chose LCD over plasma.

It's well known that LCD/Plasma are more closely matched than ever before - and as always - users should try them out before making a purchase :thumbsup:



I acknowledge clearly and fairly, that both panel types are not without fault - they are closely matched - one is generally not completely better than the other. If this makes me a fanboy, then God save us all for presenting even-sided arguments.

Note that I even suggest that people try out their desired purchase before taking the plunge? Why, yes! I did, didn't I?

Clearly, I am the biggest fanboy in this thread. Fact.

It would be prudent for you to read posts in full, in future. At least in my opinion. Whether you choose to do this, is of course totally up to you.
#37
@thesilverfox

Let me acknowledge a few things:
- I should have stated that my comments related particularly to LCD TV with edge-lit LED, as in the case of Samsung TVs and some Sony TVs.
- In regards to point 1 - it may well be an opinion or a matter of perception, but everyone I know who has an LCD panel or LCD/LED panel agrees with this. There are numerous example also of users of many forums bemoaning the same. I myself didn't understand it until I experienced it first hand over many hours/films. After a while it became very difficult to enjoy a film.
- I should have stated point 2 - motion blur is not evident to all, but certainly is a characteristic of LCD panels (whether back-lit with florescent tubes or LED).
- I should have stated points 3 & 4 related particularly to Samsung LCD TV with edge-lit LED. I maintain this is an inherent defect, to a greater or lesser extent, in ALL Samsungs, as acknowledged by Samsung. Whether everyone will notice this if the defect is quite small is another matter.

Herein lies the problem of buying a TV at any time. I read many review and they were all glowing. Having done my research, I was prepared to accept some of the disadvantages BUT not the known defects which didn't become evident until some months later. Take the Panasonic 2009 range of Plasma; the black level, MLL, IR issues didn't become evident until later part of 2009, but the G10 and V10s received glowing reviews. After my experience of the UE46B8000, I did my research before committing myself to the Panasonic TX-P50V10. All the forums suggested the MLL rise, the black level rise and the IR issues only affected the G10 panels and almost exclusively the US models. It is only after I had paid for and received the TV has the same issues that plagued the G10 appeared on the V10.

I do not believe that the Best Buy sets in the 3D Demo rooms were ISS calibrated, but on the opening day it was manned by reps from each of the manufacturers and thus the settings were pretty much optimum (without pro calibration). Bear in mind that these are NOT on the shop floor but specially set up rooms. However, that is irrelevant as the 'clouding' and 'coning' is a panel issue and not a settings issue. If it had been a settings issue, Samsung would have merely asked me to change my settings rather than accept returns and/or send out engineers.

If you care to read many of my other posts, I have acknowledged the virtues of LCD and Plasma. However, these Samsung LCD/LED have too many defects not inherent in other sets. If Panasonic did not shoot itself in the foot by implementing a coarse MLL rise in their 2009 range, there would have been no competition in terms of panel superiority.

P.S. You did accuse me of not owning a Samsung LCD/LED or even having seen one, thus I would say that counts as calling me a liar.

It is a little ironic that in days gone by, my CB radio handle was Silver Fox.
#38
tpol
@thesilverfox

Let me acknowledge a few things:
- I should have stated that my comments related particularly to LCD TV with edge-lit LED, as in the case of Samsung TVs and some Sony TVs.
- In regards to point 1 - it may well be an opinion or a matter of perception, but everyone I know who has an LCD panel or LCD/LED panel agrees with this. There are numerous example also of users of many forums bemoaning the same. I myself didn't understand it until I experienced it first hand over many hours/films. After a while it became very difficult to enjoy a film.
- I should have stated point 2 - motion blur is not evident to all, but certainly is a characteristic of LCD panels (whether back-lit with florescent tubes or LED).
- I should have stated points 3 & 4 related particularly to Samsung LCD TV with edge-lit LED. I maintain this is an inherent defect, to a greater or lesser extent, in ALL Samsungs, as acknowledged by Samsung. Whether everyone will notice this if the defect is quite small is another matter.

Herein lies the problem of buying a TV at any time. I read many review and they were all glowing. Having done my research, I was prepared to accept some of the disadvantages BUT not the known defects which didn't become evident until some months later. Take the Panasonic 2009 range of Plasma; the black level, MLL, IR issues didn't become evident until later part of 2009, but the G10 and V10s received glowing reviews. After my experience of the UE46B8000, I did my research before committing myself to the Panasonic TX-P50V10. All the forums suggested the MLL rise, the black level rise and the IR issues only affected the G10 panels and almost exclusively the US models. It is only after I had paid for and received the TV has the same issues that plagued the G10 appeared on the V10.

I do not believe that the Best Buy sets in the 3D Demo rooms were ISS calibrated, but on the opening day it was manned by reps from each of the manufacturers and thus the settings were pretty much optimum (without pro calibration). Bear in mind that these are NOT on the shop floor but specially set up rooms. However, that is irrelevant as the 'clouding' and 'coning' is a panel issue and not a settings issue. If it had been a settings issue, Samsung would have merely asked me to change my settings rather than accept returns and/or send out engineers.

If you care to read many of my other posts, I have acknowledged the virtues of LCD and Plasma. However, these Samsung LCD/LED have too many defects not inherent in other sets. If Panasonic did not shoot itself in the foot by implementing a coarse MLL rise in their 2009 range, there would have been no competition in terms of panel superiority.

P.S. You did accuse me of not owning a Samsung LCD/LED or even having seen one, thus I would say that counts as calling me a liar.

It is a little ironic that in days gone by, my CB radio handle was Silver Fox.


I suggested that you probably hadn't owned this particular panel. I didn't say outright or claim otherwise. I chose my wording quite carefully. I guess therefore, that I am ... wrong? Yes, I suppose so, judging by your detailed account :thumbsup:

If the reviews suggested a glowing opinion, yet issues surfaced later (some of which sound like they were present from the start for you), does that not make you question the reviewer(s)? Or that a batch has been manufactured badly? I know it would certainly make me feel the need to emphasise my point of trying out panels before buying them (expensive or otherwise).

As for amending your points, I think that all points, excluding number one, now represent a far more accurate depiction of what you were trying to get across - it really pays dividends to be 100% clear, else you WILL get the responses found in this thread and not just myself retorting.

Point one, however, is still a matter of opinion - it is not documented fact. For every complaint, can we also report on the number of satisfied consumers? (rhetorical and likely 'no') What about those that complain about plasma display panels?

You have to understand my reluctance to accept 'facts', when nobody ever quotes reliable sources with documented figures. There may well be a known issue with certain panels, but could anyone quote a percentage of defects from the entire number manufactured?

Unlikely. A bit like how I accept that there are known issues with Xbox 360 consoles (fortunately, not mine), but can anyone provide a realistic percentage? No, not at all - these are not documented in the public domain by Microsoft (it'd be damaging).

As for the sense of irony, I'm afraid not - I don't see it at all.
#39
@thesilverfox

I don't think I was standing up for plasmas or purporting plasmas to be some sort of panacea; if I remember correctly I did not mention plasmas in my first post. I was merely pointing out the shortcomings of this LCD/LED TV and others similar to it. Heaven forbid if people should be given information that makes them cautious before spending hundreds of pounds that they may regret.

Like all technologies plasmas gets a beating when it does not perform, I have mentioned the Panasonics, but don't forget the horrendous IR on LG plasma sets. So I am not driven by blind faith but have a rounded appreciation of all technologies. I stand by every word (amended) that I have stated in regards to the LCD/LED panels.
#40
thesilverfox
I suggested that you probably hadn't owned this particular panel. I didn't say outright or claim otherwise. I chose my wording quite carefully. I guess therefore, that I am ... wrong? Yes, I suppose so, judging by your detailed account :thumbsup:

[COLOR="DarkRed"]That is a question of semantics. The context would lead one to believe that you are doubting the truthfulness of the statement, despite how carefully worded your actual response is.[/COLOR]

If the reviews suggested a glowing opinion, yet issues surfaced later (some of which sound like they were present from the start for you), does that not make you question the reviewer(s)? Or that a batch has been manufactured badly? I know it would certainly make me feel the need to emphasise my point of trying out panels before buying them (expensive or otherwise).

[COLOR="DarkRed"]The problems with LCD with side-lit LED (not full backlighting) is not about a poorly manufactured batch, but the implementation of the technology in such a thin panel is such it is prone to such defects; in particular clouding but coning also. If you use this tech in these thin panels the defects will surface on most panels in a lesser or greater extent. This is exactly the same as Panasonic MLL implementation; where some people have notice the problems and not others. However, it is accepted by Panasonic (who call it a feature and not a defect) and independent tests have shown all panels are affected; the degree of issue is different.[/COLOR]

As for amending your points, I think that all points, excluding number one, now represent a far more accurate depiction of what you were trying to get across - it really pays dividends to be 100% clear, else you WILL get the responses found in this thread and not just myself retorting.

Point one, however, is still a matter of opinion - it is not documented fact. For every complaint, can we also report on the number of satisfied consumers? (rhetorical and likely 'no') What about those that complain about plasma display panels?

You have to understand my reluctance to accept 'facts', when nobody ever quotes reliable sources with documented figures. There may well be a known issue with certain panels, but could anyone quote a percentage of defects from the entire number manufactured?

Unlikely. A bit like how I accept that there are known issues with Xbox 360 consoles (fortunately, not mine), but can anyone provide a realistic percentage? No, not at all - these are not documented in the public domain by Microsoft (it'd be damaging).

As for the sense of irony, I'm afraid not - I don't see it at all.

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