USB Wrist Blood Pressure Monitor @ Maplin only £14.99 was £29.99 - HotUKDeals
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USB Wrist Blood Pressure Monitor


Measures systolic, diastolic and heart pulse at home or on your travels
Data transfer to PC by USB cable
CD-ROM with software for data management
Stores up to 3 different people results, for up to 30 measurements each
Calculation of average of all stored values of each memory zone
Large, easy to read LCD display
Battery powered
Simple, automatic operation

This fully automatic USB wrist blood pressure monitor is both easy to use and ideally suited for daily measurements. Transfer measurements to a laptop or PC. It is ideal for users, who want to monitor and record their blood pressure on a regular basis. This wrist monitor makes is compact and portable, making ideal for home, office or travel.
Note: Please read important health warning before purchasing or using this product.
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steveilevi Avatar
8y, 9m agoFound 8 years, 9 months ago
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#1
Go to a lloyds Pharmacy and buy one for £9.99 it doesn`t have the USB but stores previous readings (normally £29.99)
#2
These have come up at £9.99 in Lidl and Aldi in the past. I think i've even seen them at £6.99.
Voting cold.
#3
I have normally seen in clinics, that BP is measured around the upper arm & the pulse around the wrist. How accurate is the measurement of BP at wrist? Could some one let me know pls.
#4
Wrist monitors are not recommended for SERIOUS use. You Doctor wouldn't use one on you, they always use the upper arm type. I have used wrist monitors in the past and discovered that their readings are not accurate, using such in the longer term is potentially dangerous.:w00t:
Go to Lloyds chemist, purchase their upper arm monitors for £9.99 (ensure you get the correct arm cuff, medium/large) and read the instructions. ;-)
Don't stop there though, make an oppointment with your local Doctor/nurse for a blood pressure check and take your newly acquired monitor with you. Ensure that the monitor registers the same reading as taken by the surgery monitor, and adhere to any advise offered. :thumbsup:

Wrist monitors, you're fired.....
#5
I'm a student nurse and your blood pressure can be taken Upper or lower arm, upper or lower leg... but upper arms ARE slightly more accurate
#6
Hillzat43;1575316
Wrist monitors are not recommended for SERIOUS use. You Doctor wouldn't use one on you, they always use the upper arm type. I have used wrist monitors in the past and discovered that their readings are not accurate, using such in the longer term is potentially dangerous.:w00t:
Go to Lloyds chemist, purchase their upper arm monitors for £9.99 (ensure you get the correct arm cuff, medium/large) and read the instructions. ;-)
Don't stop there though, make an oppointment with your local Doctor/nurse for a blood pressure check and take your newly acquired monitor with you. Ensure that the monitor registers the same reading as taken by the surgery monitor, and adhere to any advise offered. :thumbsup:

Wrist monitors, you're fired.....


Who says the blood pressure monitors that doctors use are accurate? I compared the result from my £9.99 Lidl wrist monitor with a doctor's monitor - there was a difference of about 16 (?points) to the upper reading. Went to another doctor and the readings between the two monitors was identical.
'Doctor one' was using a bp monitor that read from a dial, 'doctor two' took a reading from a mercury manometer.
Juries out on bp monitors whether belonging to a doctor or a mere serf.
#7
Lloyds are arm monitors, these wrist monitors are not accurate, the main problem is it gives different results in the same person, so you cannot monitor any rises/falls accurately. I would not buy or use even if given for free. Arm monitors are much more reliable (notice not using the term accurate); they give consistent results for each person, so ups/downs can be judged effectively. There is no such thing as an accurate monitor. Accuracy is relative; the main requirement is the monitor gives reasonable accuracy but consistency is key. It is this that enable ups/downs to be judged. Each monitor/person monitoring will give different results. So don't be fooled by the word accuracy, it is really not that important.

I am a pharmacist and a patient, know exactly what I am taking about and would not want anyone to become ill by using wrist monitors; if you have a high blood pressure problem, you must use the arm one, or go to the same GP each time for monitoring, insisting on two readings - they will not mind. The nurse reading must be rechecked if high/low - always. Go for the Lloyds arm monitors, they are also cheaper - I have one.
pg

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