Value Wireless 802.11n 300Mbps 4-Port DSL Broadband Router £21.87 @ Dabs - HotUKDeals
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Wireless 300M Broadband Router

Impressive Data Transmission Rate via IEEE802.11n

The GR-724W is a high speed broadband router that complies with wireless IEEE 802.11b/g/n standard. When operating in the wireless 802.11n mode, the GR-724W wireless data transmission rate can reach up to 300Mbps - a coverage 5 times better than a standard 802.11g/b broadband router. The GR-724W is also backward compatible with 802.11b/g devices so users don't need to replace all legacy 802.11b/g devices. The GR-724W is truly a high performance solution for your home and small business network.

Windows 7 compatible.
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dijital Avatar
5y, 11m agoFound 5 years, 11 months ago
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Comments/page:
#1
I need a Wireless Router to replace my USB modem.

What are these like?

I need something fast and reliable
#2
Good price for 300Mbps
#3
Will any wireless dongle work with this, as i havent got wireless on my pc.
1 Like #4
karl100100
Will any wireless dongle work with this, as i havent got wireless on my pc.

Yes in theory.

Keith
#5
Thx OP :)
#6
I have one ... It a good router ! I paid £14 for mine 18months ago from aria.
it is now
£18.21 inc. VAT....... if you live near aria and pick it up it up.
http://www.aria.co.uk/SuperSpecials/Other+products/GetNet+WLAN+802.11n+300mbps+4-Port+DSL+Router+?productId=38840

ONLY ONE LEFT THOUGH !
hope I help one person get a better deal :)
hope i helped one person out :)
#7
I like to specify (for those who don't know) that this router it's cable only!!! in other words not suttable for BT ADSL lines. It's good for virginmedia like modems.
Regards
#8
It quite clearly states DSL modem.
#9
dijital
It quite clearly states DSL modem.


Yeah, but I'm not sure it has one built-in. More here:

Manufacturer's Website
#10
nickbooth
dijital
It quite clearly states DSL modem.


Yeah, but I'm not sure it has one built-in. More here:

Manufacturer's Website


It's a cable router, check the manual, it shows the router as having a WAN ethernet port. Routers with a built in ADSL modem have an RJ11 connection for connection to a telephone line. Therefore this doesn't have a built in ADSL modem
#11
I would never buy a value router/modem the real buy a decent brand because the most important thing is good quality firmware and support
#12
REALLY odd that they're explicitly selling it as an ADSL router when the spec shows otherwise.

This deal could disappoint people if they bought it and should probably be pulled as it seems to be a mistake.
#13
MKultra
REALLY odd that they're explicitly selling it as an ADSL router when the spec shows otherwise.


Nowhere does it say that this is an ASDL modem.

Edited By: iambigred on Dec 20, 2010 12:03
#14
You should always try to match the brand of your wireless receiver dongle (if used) to that of your router to avoid signal transmission drop outs.

Just bought a wireless set-up to suit a laptop just bought. We have a phone point in the room that the desktop is in, so never needed wireless, until the missus wanted a laptop.

Just bought the Netgear WNA1100 ADSL N150 Router for £32.95 (it's £37.95, down from £49.99, and you can get a £5 code from the Currys/PC World Christmas brochure).

Bought the Netgear DGN1000 N150 Receiver dongle from PC World for £12.99 (it's £17.99 from £24.99, again, used the brochure to get another fiver off).

Why the big deal for shelling out on N300 spec? No one outside Japan has broadband speeds close to 300MBPS, and if you're on ADSL, you're unlikely to get more than 8MBPS. If you're streaming 1080P HD content from a networked drive, this still only needs 20MBPS.

If it's for range, I live in a 3 storey town house and although the Router is downstairs, my desktop is receiving 100% signal on 1st floor, and when the laptop is on the top floor i'm still getting 75% signal strength/speed.

My broadband is now faster through my wireless setup than through my ISP supplied ADSL modem.
#15
monkeyhanger75
You should always try to match the brand of your wireless receiver dongle (if used) to that of your router to avoid signal transmission drop outs.


That's interesting if that statement was true then laptops/netbooks/phones using their internal wifi hardware would experience problems. Tell me how I should add a wifi dongle to my Orange San Francisco to circumvent these made up problems?

The reason that Netgear for example want you to use a Netgear dongle is obvious. There can be problems with all wifi hardware, but as illustrated by my comment above, a lot of the time you can't change the wifi hardware and if there was a significant problem we'd all be smashing up our phones in frustration. The San Francisco is a good example actually the wifi does drop out but a software fix sorts it. The Tenda N150 wireless cable router/access point has problems with iphones using certain firmware, get the right firmware version and it's ok. So yes there can be problems, should you go out of your way to match wifi hardware by brand, no.

Edited By: fishmaster on Dec 20, 2010 13:41
#16
Fishmaster: The operative word is "try". If you need a dongle to go with your router, you should "try" and match. Obviously hoping for complete compatibility without issues for those with built in connectivity, but if not, hopefully the manufacturers should be on the ball with driver updates.

I only mentioned matching IF you need a dongle to go with the router. In your case your phone does not need a dongle, so no need to "try" and match.

Manufacturers products are more likely to be 100% compatible with products within their own range because they know their own stuff better than anyone else.

Please "try" not to be a smart @rse unless the post you're referring to is misleading when read properly and in context.
#17
monkeyhanger75
Fishmaster: The operative word is "try". If you need a dongle to go with your router, you should "try" and match. Obviously hoping for complete compatibility without issues for those with built in connectivity, but if not, hopefully the manufacturers should be on the ball with driver updates.

I only mentioned matching IF you need a dongle to go with the router. In your case your phone does not need a dongle, so no need to "try" and match.

Manufacturers products are more likely to be 100% compatible with products within their own range because they know their own stuff better than anyone else.

Please "try" not to be a smart @rse unless the post you're referring to is misleading when read properly and in context.


You're talking nonsense though, you don't need to try and match up brands, where's your evidence for this statement? For some reason dongles have to be matched according to you yet preinstalled wifi hardware doesn't. I've done over 1000 wifi installations for residential and business customers, so I've obviously been incredibly lucky not to have needed to match dongles by brand to their respective router. Therefore what I did today using a Tenda wireless N dongle with a BT homehub router should cause problems or maybe I should have found a BT branded dongle and that would have saved any future trouble, of course I would have had to know that the homehub is made by Thomson and then tried to find a Thomson branded wifi dongle.

I'm not trying to be a smartarse, I know what I'm talking about which you clearly don't.

Please explain why a wifi chipset connected via usb (a dongle) is somehow going to perform differently to a wifi chipset built in to hardware such as phones, so that warrants we match them by brand?

The premise of your post is based on the assumption that matching brands must be better because the manufacturer knows their hardware best, where in reality it's entirely possible to use different brands without trouble and that's what people do all the time. The assertion that people should try and match by brand was created by you based on your assumptions which in my experience are proven to be false.

Your statement has as much credibility as someone who only buys records that go to number 1 as they falsely assume them to be best, and believe me I've met people who have acted and think like that! lol


Edited By: fishmaster on Dec 20, 2010 14:49: .
#18
#19
Fishmaster: You are less likely to get bother by matching dongle (if needed) to router manufacturer. Didn't say or imply that you definitely would get incompatibilities if you didn't. It is possible to use different brands, but you are more likely to get incompatibilities if you do this, and no, i'm not saying you're massively more likely to get incompatibilities.

If there's a reason to mix and match e.g. down to price, say if you have a Belkin router, but can get a Cisco dongle 1/2 the price of the Belkin equivalent then go for it. It may (and probably will) work.

If you need a dongle and a router, and there is no strong reason not to mix and match then it will make incompatibilities less likely and may make the installation a lot easier if they're matched by manufacturer.

Routers can be really easy to set up when everything goes right, but they are a nightmare to sort out when all the components don't communicate with each other properly.

At no point did I say that a dongle would work better than built in networking receiver hardware on your laptop/phone etc. You are just as likely to get incompatibilities with an unmatched dongle as you are with built in receivers. Incompatibilities with routers/receivers used to be far more common than they are now. More manufacturers are now strictly adhering to the relevant wifi standards

The biggest point to my post was that N300 in the UK, even with a 50MBit cable connection is not neccessary unless you plan on using it in a huge building for the range benefits.

There are plenty of routers out there that keep dropping connections, and just to take a common sense approach would try to minimise potential hardware clashes as a potential cause.





Edited By: monkeyhanger75 on Dec 20, 2010 15:36: z
#20
monkeyhanger75
Fishmaster: You are less likely to get bother by matching dongle (if needed) to router manufacturer. Didn't say or imply that you definitely would get incompatibilities if you didn't. It is possible to use different brands, but you are more likely to get incompatibilities if you do this, and no, i'm not saying you're massively more likely to get incompatibilities.

If there's a reason to mix and match e.g. down to price, say if you have a Belkin router, but can get a Cisco dongle 1/2 the price of the Belkin equivalent then go for it. It may (and probably will) work.

If you need a dongle and a router, and there is no strong reason not to mix and match then it will make incompatibilities less likely and may make the installation a lot easier if they're matched by manufacturer.

Routers can be really easy to set up when everything goes right, but they are a nightmare to sort out when all the components don't communicate with each other properly.

At no point did I say that a dongle would work better than built in networking receiver hardware on your laptop/phone etc. You are just as likely to get incompatibilities with an unmatched dongle as you are with built in receivers. Incompatibilities with routers/receivers used to be far more common than they are now. More manufacturers are now strictly adhering to the relevant wifi standards

The biggest point to my post was that N300 in the UK, even with a 50MBit cable connection is not neccessary unless you plan on using it in a huge building for the range benefits.

There are plenty of routers out there that keep dropping connections, and just to take a common sense approach would try to minimise potential hardware clashes as a potential cause.


I've made my position clear on this, there's no reason to worry about matching the same dongle brand to a router and as I've demonstrated clearly with the homehub example you usually can't without unnecessary faffing about. Your'e saying there's no reason not to match and I'm saying there's no reason to go to the extra hassle of trying to match. You haven't demonstrated that using a matching brand is bound to be better than not using one, that's your assumption. I'm saying it generally doesn't matter and this is my experience as I've alluded to above. I do this for a living and my advice is not to concern yourself with matching. We won't get past this I think so anyone reading this thread knows my advice and yours and they can make their own minds up if they even want to consider our opinions that is.

Why the big deal for shelling out on N300 spec? No one outside Japan has broadband speeds close to 300MBPS, and if you're on ADSL, you're unlikely to get more than 8MBPS. If you're streaming 1080P HD content from a networked drive, this still only needs 20MBPS.


You're embarressing yourself now. It shows me and others that you don't understand the basics.

The biggest point to my post was that N300 in the UK, even with a 50MBit cable connection is not neccessary unless you plan on using it in a huge building for the range benefits.


You clearly don't understand the difference between LAN speed and WAN speed. I won't waste anymore time in conversing with you on matters you don't have a proper understanding of.

Edited By: fishmaster on Dec 20, 2010 17:31: .

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