Vertigo Moroto 700c front suspension hybrid bike £70 free c&c @ tesco - HotUKDeals
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Vertigo Moroto 700c front suspension hybrid bike £70.00 free c&c @ tesco

£70.00 @ Tesco Direct
The Vertigo Moroto ladies' hybrid bike is versatile enough to handle leisure rides and the daily commute. It comes equipped with a low-step 17-inch alloy frame and fork, and 28-inch wheels with tyres … Read More
POWYSWALES Avatar
5m, 2w agoFound 5 months, 2 weeks ago
The Vertigo Moroto ladies' hybrid bike is versatile enough to handle leisure rides and the daily commute. It comes equipped with a low-step 17-inch alloy frame and fork, and 28-inch wheels with tyres that allow for some light off-road excursions. The front and rear caliper brakes gives the bike reliable stopping power, even in wet and rainy conditions.

In silver with orange details, the Vertigo Moroto ladies' hybrid bike also benefits from 18-speed Shimano gears with twist-grip controls for easy gear changes.

Read more at http://www.tesco.com/direct/vertigo-moroto-700c-front-suspension-hybrid-bike-17-frame/464-8353.prd#qqU5SfrKvB577fDB.99
POWYSWALES Avatar
5m, 2w agoFound 5 months, 2 weeks ago
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#2
Heat!
2 Likes #3
It's still a £70 bike for £70 but at 12.6kg it's not too heavy (unlike the other one you posted - if you're determined to buy one of the two, choose this one).
#4
How do you get free Click & Collect? It's showing as delivery only for me which is an extra £7.95? Thanks
3 Likes #5
The main problem with buying from Tesco or Asda for that matter is the bikes are not setup. I would question if it's legal, surely they need to sell a bike that is safe to ride. Is it of satisfactory quality and fit for purpose? If you go to a bike shop they do a pre delivery inspection and the mechanic signs the form. The main purpose of this is to protect them from you then having an accident and blaming them. By all means buy a cheap bike, but do yourself a favour and make sure it's set up properly.

Edited By: winchman on Feb 06, 2017 10:13
6 Likes #6
winchman
The main problem with buying from Tesco or Asda for that matter is the bikes are not setup. I would question if it's legal, surely they need to sell a bike that is safe to ride. Is it of satisfactory quality and fit for purpose? If you go to a bike shop they do a pre delivery inspection and the mechanic signs the form. The main purpose of this is to protect them from you then having an accident and blaming them. By all means buy a cheap bike, but do yourself a favour and make sure it's set up properly.

That's a 'health and safety gone mad' question if ever I saw one, all bikes aren't ready-built for shipping purposes. You can take a bike home and build it yourself if you like. What happens if you buy it from the internet and have it delivered, nobody comes around to build it for you, you have to do this yourself.




Edited By: Jinkz on Feb 06, 2017 11:17: .
2 Likes #7
If you own a bike you should be perfectly comfortable setting it up to ride from the way it arrives, it's no more difficult than performing the same maintenance you need to keep it safe & road worthy.
1 Like #8
Jinkz
winchman
The main problem with buying from Tesco or Asda for that matter is the bikes are not setup. I would question if it's legal, surely they need to sell a bike that is safe to ride. Is it of satisfactory quality and fit for purpose? If you go to a bike shop they do a pre delivery inspection and the mechanic signs the form. The main purpose of this is to protect them from you then having an accident and blaming them. By all means buy a cheap bike, but do yourself a favour and make sure it's set up properly.
That's a 'health and safety gone mad' question if ever I saw one, all bikes aren't ready-built for shipping purposes. You can take a bike home and build it yourself if you like. What happens if you buy it from the internet and have it delivered, nobody comes around to build it for you, you have to do this yourself.

That's your opinion, If you are a customer, its reasonable to expect that it will be safe.
2010 No. 198 CONSUMER PROTECTION, The Pedal Bicycles (Safety) Regulations 2010
2005 No. 1803 CONSUMER PROTECTION, The General Product Safety Regulations 2005

If you buy online the bike will normally have a pre delivery inspection, the bike shop don't want you to give it bad reviews because they sold you a duff bike, but they also don't want to be subject to legal problems. If you buy on line they need to provide tools and instructions to allow you to set up the bike, normally just straighten the handlebars and fit the pedals.

Edited By: winchman on Feb 06, 2017 12:01
#9
A 'hybrid' bike? Where do you plug it in, and how many miles will a battery charge last?
2 Likes #10
winchman
Jinkz
winchman
The main problem with buying from Tesco or Asda for that matter is the bikes are not setup. I would question if it's legal, surely they need to sell a bike that is safe to ride. Is it of satisfactory quality and fit for purpose? If you go to a bike shop they do a pre delivery inspection and the mechanic signs the form. The main purpose of this is to protect them from you then having an accident and blaming them. By all means buy a cheap bike, but do yourself a favour and make sure it's set up properly.
That's a 'health and safety gone mad' question if ever I saw one, all bikes aren't ready-built for shipping purposes. You can take a bike home and build it yourself if you like. What happens if you buy it from the internet and have it delivered, nobody comes around to build it for you, you have to do this yourself.
That's your opinion, If you are a customer, its reasonable to expect that it will be safe.
2010 No. 198 CONSUMER PROTECTION, The Pedal Bicycles (Safety) Regulations 2010
2005 No. 1803 CONSUMER PROTECTION, The General Product Safety Regulations 2005
If you buy online the bike will normally have a pre delivery inspection, the bike shop don't want you to give it bad reviews because they sold you a duff bike, but they also don't want to be subject to legal problems. If you buy on line they need to provide tools and instructions to allow you to set up the bike, normally just straighten the handlebars and fit the pedals.
If tesco/asda were to pre set up the bikes that would leave them more liable than providing it unassembled, if you are not confident at setting up the bike you have the option of taking it to a bike shop and paying for assembly.
#11
winchman
Jinkz
winchman
The main problem with buying from Tesco or Asda for that matter is the bikes are not setup. I would question if it's legal, surely they need to sell a bike that is safe to ride. Is it of satisfactory quality and fit for purpose? If you go to a bike shop they do a pre delivery inspection and the mechanic signs the form. The main purpose of this is to protect them from you then having an accident and blaming them. By all means buy a cheap bike, but do yourself a favour and make sure it's set up properly.
That's a 'health and safety gone mad' question if ever I saw one, all bikes aren't ready-built for shipping purposes. You can take a bike home and build it yourself if you like. What happens if you buy it from the internet and have it delivered, nobody comes around to build it for you, you have to do this yourself.
That's your opinion, If you are a customer, its reasonable to expect that it will be safe.
2010 No. 198 CONSUMER PROTECTION, The Pedal Bicycles (Safety) Regulations 2010
2005 No. 1803 CONSUMER PROTECTION, The General Product Safety Regulations 2005
If you buy online the bike will normally have a pre delivery inspection, the bike shop don't want you to give it bad reviews because they sold you a duff bike, but they also don't want to be subject to legal problems. If you buy on line they need to provide tools and instructions to allow you to set up the bike, normally just straighten the handlebars and fit the pedals.

It's no an opinion, everything I said is factual.

All you're doing now is spouting some law names without actually applying them to what you're saying. Tesco have been selling bikes for years illegally? Sounds unlikely!
#12
that's the valentine present sorted !!!!
#13
winchman
Jinkz
winchman
The main problem with buying from Tesco or Asda for that matter is the bikes are not setup. I would question if it's legal, surely they need to sell a bike that is safe to ride. Is it of satisfactory quality and fit for purpose? If you go to a bike shop they do a pre delivery inspection and the mechanic signs the form. The main purpose of this is to protect them from you then having an accident and blaming them. By all means buy a cheap bike, but do yourself a favour and make sure it's set up properly.
That's a 'health and safety gone mad' question if ever I saw one, all bikes aren't ready-built for shipping purposes. You can take a bike home and build it yourself if you like. What happens if you buy it from the internet and have it delivered, nobody comes around to build it for you, you have to do this yourself.

That's your opinion, If you are a customer, its reasonable to expect that it will be safe.
2010 No. 198 CONSUMER PROTECTION, The Pedal Bicycles (Safety) Regulations 2010
2005 No. 1803 CONSUMER PROTECTION, The General Product Safety Regulations 2005

If you buy online the bike will normally have a pre delivery inspection, the bike shop don't want you to give it bad reviews because they sold you a duff bike, but they also don't want to be subject to legal problems. If you buy on line they need to provide tools and instructions to allow you to set up the bike, normally just straighten the handlebars and fit the pedals.


Likewise, the nonsense you're sprouting is just your opinion. As a customer you don't have to buy it. For goodness sake, one of the problems with this country (of which I am a native) these days, is that nobody expects to take responsibility for themselves as the nanny state has taken that away.

So are you telling me I can't buy any components for my bike (or car for that matter) and fit them myself, am I ok to replace my punctured tyre as all I not given was the new tube with no tools or instructions?!
3 Likes #14
winchman
The main problem with buying from Tesco or Asda for that matter is the bikes are not setup. I would question if it's legal, surely they need to sell a bike that is safe to ride. Is it of satisfactory quality and fit for purpose? If you go to a bike shop they do a pre delivery inspection and the mechanic signs the form. The main purpose of this is to protect them from you then having an accident and blaming them. By all means buy a cheap bike, but do yourself a favour and make sure it's set up properly.
Surely its better to do it yourself than rely on the fact someone else has done it correctly.

It a push bike FFS, hardly rocket science.

Do people really lack technical ability these days that they have no confidence to put a bike together?

I remember as a kid in primary school maintaining a bike, swapping frames, scavaging scap parts.

People these days couldnt seem to put a nut in a monkeys mouth.
#15
I think the other bike listed is better. Cheap suspension is awful and you don't normally see it on a hybrid anyway. Annoyingly some of the other parts of the spec do look better than the other bike. Looks like this one has double wall wheels of higher quality. The tourney deraileur looks better and it clearly is designed to sell at a higher price but its a hybrid why do you need suspension? Seems poorly designed. Also this cheap suspension can be problematic later when seals fail etc. Solid forks are much better and you will cycle more efficiently which makes the other bike better overall.

I have no problem with cheap bikes in general as long as you are competent to adjust and service them and they don't have suspension. This one clearly fails on the suspension issue. If you are planning to get a bike for commuting buy the other bike.
1 Like #16
bonzobanana
I think the other bike listed is better. Cheap suspension is awful and you don't normally see it on a hybrid anyway. Annoyingly some of the other parts of the spec do look better than the other bike. Looks like this one has double wall wheels of higher quality. The tourney deraileur looks better and it clearly is designed to sell at a higher price but its a hybrid why do you need suspension? Seems poorly designed. Also this cheap suspension can be problematic later when seals fail etc. Solid forks are much better and you will cycle more efficiently which makes the other bike better overall.
I have no problem with cheap bikes in general as long as you are competent to adjust and service them and they don't have suspension. This one clearly fails on the suspension issue. If you are planning to get a bike for commuting buy the other bike.

For me the unnecessary suspension forks were countered by it being 6kg lighter thanks to the alloy frame. But you're right, they're definitely a hindrance not a help.
I reckon if you bought both, swapped the front forks and returned the other bike with suspension forks (and kept this bike with rigid steel forks) you'd have a reasonably good £70 bike.
I'm sure Tesco wouldn't notice that the bike you were returning had the wrong ("upgraded" to suspension) forks on it! ;)


Edited By: ArthurDent1 on Feb 06, 2017 16:56: TYPO
1 Like #17
Jinkz
winchman
Jinkz
winchman
The main problem with buying from Tesco or Asda for that matter is the bikes are not setup. I would question if it's legal, surely they need to sell a bike that is safe to ride. Is it of satisfactory quality and fit for purpose? If you go to a bike shop they do a pre delivery inspection and the mechanic signs the form. The main purpose of this is to protect them from you then having an accident and blaming them. By all means buy a cheap bike, but do yourself a favour and make sure it's set up properly.
That's a 'health and safety gone mad' question if ever I saw one, all bikes aren't ready-built for shipping purposes. You can take a bike home and build it yourself if you like. What happens if you buy it from the internet and have it delivered, nobody comes around to build it for you, you have to do this yourself.
That's your opinion, If you are a customer, its reasonable to expect that it will be safe.
2010 No. 198 CONSUMER PROTECTION, The Pedal Bicycles (Safety) Regulations 2010
2005 No. 1803 CONSUMER PROTECTION, The General Product Safety Regulations 2005
If you buy online the bike will normally have a pre delivery inspection, the bike shop don't want you to give it bad reviews because they sold you a duff bike, but they also don't want to be subject to legal problems. If you buy on line they need to provide tools and instructions to allow you to set up the bike, normally just straighten the handlebars and fit the pedals.
It's no an opinion, everything I said is factual.
All you're doing now is spouting some law names without actually applying them to what you're saying. Tesco have been selling bikes for years illegally? Sounds unlikely!

The main purpose of my post was to encourage people to have a bike set up properly. A bike from a supermarket will almost certainly not be ready to ride.
1 Like #18
callum84


It a push bike FFS, hardly rocket science.
Do people really lack technical ability these days that they have no confidence to put a bike together?

Judging by some of the stuff online, not just bikes, it seems not.

Edited By: winchman on Feb 06, 2017 16:58
1 Like #19
Oh... Vertigo Moroto... I thought at first glance that Viggo Mortensen had started to make bikes...
1 Like #20
ArthurDent1
bonzobanana
I think the other bike listed is better. Cheap suspension is awful and you don't normally see it on a hybrid anyway. Annoyingly some of the other parts of the spec do look better than the other bike. Looks like this one has double wall wheels of higher quality. The tourney deraileur looks better and it clearly is designed to sell at a higher price but its a hybrid why do you need suspension? Seems poorly designed. Also this cheap suspension can be problematic later when seals fail etc. Solid forks are much better and you will cycle more efficiently which makes the other bike better overall.
I have no problem with cheap bikes in general as long as you are competent to adjust and service them and they don't have suspension. This one clearly fails on the suspension issue. If you are planning to get a bike for commuting buy the other bike.
For me the unnecessary suspension forks were countered by it being 6kg lighter thanks to the alloy frame. But you're right, they're definitely a hindrance not a help.
I reckon if you bought both, swapped the front forks and returned the other bike with suspension forks (and kept this bike with rigid steel forks) you'd have a reasonably good £70 bike.
I'm sure Tesco wouldn't notice that the bike you were returning had the wrong ("upgraded" to suspension) forks on it! ;)

Lets hope Tesco aren't reading this but you are completely correct. That definitely sounds like a bike worth £70. The weight difference is quite surprising. 12.6kg vs 18kg. I wonder if the 18kg is actually the boxed weight. Double wall rims and front shocks normally add some weight although maybe the front shocks are of such low quality and thin metal they are surprisingly light. I would of thought the weight difference would be no more than a couple of kg if that.
#21
If you are someone, wanting to get into cycling and starting of with something cheap and cheerful, this could be your biggets mistake yet and put yourself off for life. There si no need or this type of suspension, it adds more weight and gives virtually no ride benefit, in fact it makes you work harder as you pedal into the ground bouncing away rather than accellerating forward. Not long a go there was a very good quality Schwinn bike, without suspension listed around £100, something like that would give you years of enjoyable riding.
#22
Kidmonkey
Oh... Vertigo Moroto... I thought at first glance that Viggo Mortensen had started to make bikes...
lol. you could give frodo a backie to mordor on this.
2 Likes #23
grillnun
Kidmonkey
Oh... Vertigo Moroto... I thought at first glance that Viggo Mortensen had started to make bikes...
lol. you could give frodo a backie to mordor on this.

It'd have a cracking bell... No matter how much traffic there is on the road it'd only take one ring to rule them all!
1 Like #24
f2raf
If you are someone, wanting to get into cycling and starting of with something cheap and cheerful, this could be your biggets mistake yet and put yourself off for life. There si no need or this type of suspension, it adds more weight and gives virtually no ride benefit, in fact it makes you work harder as you pedal into the ground bouncing away rather than accellerating forward. Not long a go there was a very good quality Schwinn bike, without suspension listed around £100, something like that would give you years of enjoyable riding.

You don't mean that Schwinn bike at Wiggle do you because the spec on that was terrible and Schwinn bikes in the US are seen as very low quality and the budget models are sold in places like Walmart. That's a steel bike frame with single wall rims and very low end. Just because a bike is sold in a proper online bike shop like Wiggle doesn't automatically make it a better bike. Apart from the stupid suspension this bike just about beats that one in every area at a component level and is considerably cheaper. The Schwinn is certainly no upgrade on this or the other Vertigo bike listed on hotukdeals. The main difference is Tesco are buying direct from the chinese manufacturer and putting their bike brand on it and using their logistics system to import to the UK and sell directly to their customers. The Schwinn bike has to provide profit for Pacific cycle, Wiggle and even possibly an additional UK bicycle wholesaler. However if anyone want's the similar open frame version of that bike comparable to these Vertigo models that model is still available at the discounted price of £140. It gets you quite nice retro styling and a rear carrier, mudguards but less gears and less desirable handlebars. It's twice the price of the Vertigo bikes though.

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/schwinn-admiral-womens-2016-hybrid-bike/
banned#25
Thanks OP
1 Like #26
I bought a Vertigo road bike from Tesco a couple of years ago. It was reduced from £230 (apparently) to £70. Of course it's not gonna win the Tour de France, but it's also not gonna fall apart when you ride it. It has Claris gears, the rest is quite basic....but apart from a couple of punctures, there's nothing wrong with it. I ride it to work every day, I haven't been killed yet, it's not really uncomfortable to ride, it's actually quite good. I know these bikes aren't as good as a £500 one, but for someone on a budget who needs a bike to get from a to b.....I'm sure they're fine. As for moaning that they don't come ready assembled....get a grip. Some £1000 bikes don't come with pedals....Do you call someone to come round and put them on for you?
1 Like #27
pompey77
I bought a Vertigo road bike from Tesco a couple of years ago. It was reduced from £230 (apparently) to £70. Of course it's not gonna win the Tour de France, but it's also not gonna fall apart when you ride it. It has Claris gears, the rest is quite basic....but apart from a couple of punctures, there's nothing wrong with it. I ride it to work every day, I haven't been killed yet, it's not really uncomfortable to ride, it's actually quite good. I know these bikes aren't as good as a £500 one, but for someone on a budget who needs a bike to get from a to b.....I'm sure they're fine. As for moaning that they don't come ready assembled....get a grip. Some £1000 bikes don't come with pedals....Do you call someone to come round and put them on for you?

I bought one as well for £65. Never rode it, still in the box. Still have to lose weight before I ride it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDtA85p3HLA

There was also the Vertigo Piccadily which was only £60 but had a freewheel and only 14 gears rather than the stronger better cassette based wheel of the Carnaby. Have never seen any other bike get close to this value. Most Tesco bargain bikes are using low end components like tourney gearing. The recent racing bike they did for £70 wasn't even a patch on the Piccadily let alone the Carnaby.
#28
albandelaine
How do you get free Click & Collect? It's showing as delivery only for me which is an extra £7.95? Thanks
Adult bikes are on a 2-man delivery because the package is an awkward size, it can't be click & collected unfortunately.

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