Watch strap pin removal tool, with spare pins! £1.59 uk seller @ chancerychaircovers (ebay) - HotUKDeals
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Just seen this watch pin link removal tool with spare pins for £1.59 from a uk seller with good feedback.

Save yourself a fortune! Our local jeweller charges £7.00
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#1
I predict this will be deal of the day.
#2
Cant go wrong paid £5 today to have a link taken out.
4 Likes #3
Not the best quality. You get what you pay for.
Mine broke upon 1st use.
Same seller.
1 Like #4
Yup. Had a bad one too thought I was alone
#5
I got one of these, didn't have a clue what to do so I paid £6.99 for it doing at the jewellers instead. The moral if the story is, if you can't do it yourself get somebody else to do it but if you can do it yourself I'd still get somebody else to do it cos I'm a lazy [email protected]
#6
javz1982
Not the best quality. You get what you pay for.
Mine broke upon 1st use.
Same seller.
aabarcellos
Yup. Had a bad one too thought I was alone
deanolufc
I got one of these, didn't have a clue what to do so I paid £6.99 for it doing at the jewellers instead. The moral if the story is, if you can't do it yourself get somebody else to do it but if you can do it yourself I'd still get somebody else to do it cos I'm a lazy [email protected]
I've done three watches already and I'm not a jeweller.
#7
i used to be a jeweller and this looks like it'll do the job just fine

the pins are constantly breaking so beat yourself up about it.
#8
Ordered thanks
1 Like #9
mad2477
i used to be a jeweller and this looks like it'll do the job just fine

the pins are constantly breaking so beat yourself up about it.

well I've had a £1.99 one off ebay for years and taken out many links without breaking anything

perhaps there's a reason why you aren't a jeweller anymore?
#10
I think I might change my name by deed poll to Canchery Chaircovers.
#11
dataload
mad2477
i used to be a jeweller and this looks like it'll do the job just fine

the pins are constantly breaking so beat yourself up about it.
well I've had a £1.99 one off ebay for years and taken out many links without breaking anything
Which is all fine and dandy when the pins are easily moved in the bracelet.

Some bracelets, with collars and pins, can take a bit of umph to get the pin first moving - it's then, these plastic ones often either crack and break (the plastic base just cracks under the strain) or the cheap pins bend.

Once the pin is moving, or on a bracelet where they push out quite easily, you'd probably never see a problem.

I've adjusted some collar and pin bracelets, where when new, the pins are quite tight and don't want to be pushed out. Invariably the plastic pin removers just break. It's only better ones with a metal base, that don't crack, but even then the pins can bend if they're cheap and nasty.
#12
If your watch strap is like this, you don't need this tool, just a small screw driver.
#13
My watch looks like it has a screw head on the pin, does that mean it will need to be unscrewed rather than pushed out?

Thanks
#14
Speculator
If your watch strap is like this, you don't need this tool, just a small screw driver.
Yes, folded link bracelets, you push out the link with a small screwdriver or something similar.
#15
Good price but not the best quality. You get what you pay for.
#16
Wooderson
My watch looks like it has a screw head on the pin, does that mean it will need to be unscrewed rather than pushed out?
Possibly - is every link like that, or every removable link?
#17
Bought one of these off eBay, and same as others, broke on first use. The needle snapped.

It's plastic and very fragile. I'd save your money if I were you. Cold.
#18
Lester Burnham
Wooderson
My watch looks like it has a screw head on the pin, does that mean it will need to be unscrewed rather than pushed out?
Possibly - is every link like that, or every removable link?

Yes just on the ones with arrows.The arrow direction goes from the bottom of the pin (which has flat surface) to the top which has the screw end.
#19
Most likely poor quality.. Had one broke half way through changing strap..!!
#20
Wooderson
Lester Burnham
Wooderson
My watch looks like it has a screw head on the pin, does that mean it will need to be unscrewed rather than pushed out?
Possibly - is every link like that, or every removable link?

Yes just on the ones with arrows.The arrow direction goes from the bottom of the pin (which has flat surface) to the top which has the screw end.
In that case, I wouldn't try and use something to push the pin out, without trying to unscrew the side of the pin that has the screw head. If that unscrews, take it from there.

I've seen bracelets like that before, and also seen (and have watches) where the main spring bar (at the lugs) is a threaded bar.
#21
I have one of these. Came with a few spare pins. Adjusted 3 watches so far, one pin has broken have a couple left. Cost me £1.70, so not really fussed. Worth it IMO, unless you are adjusted watches weekly.
#22
Some people just dont seem to have a clue when using fragile tools.
The people that have no problem just 'Have a feel' for the job and are able to sense, to a degree, when you are overdoing the expectations of a device, to the point where it will break.
Ham fisted is the polite term.

Treated with respect (Meaning if you get a tight pin or a soft metal pin) EASE it. Dont force it.
Treat it like you would a woman - If it/she's stubborn use lots of persuasion. NOT brute force.
You will win in the end. :)


Edited By: rizla01 on Jul 02, 2014 11:37
#23
rizla01
Some people just dont seem to have a clue when using fragile tools.
The people that have no problem just 'Have a feel' for the job and are able to sense, to a degree, when you are overdoing the expectations of a device, to the point where it will break.
Ham fisted is the polite term.

Treated with respect (Meaning if you get a tight pin or a soft metal pin) EASE it. Dont force it.
Treat it like you would a woman - If it/she's stubborn use lots of persuasion. NOT brute force.
You will win in the end. :)

Not with the plastic tools - and not something like this.

All you can really do, is be careful how you turn the screw handle.

But the issue you've got is overcoming stiction. For pins (especially, in my experience, the pin and collar type arrangements) it will be able to provide sufficient force to either overcome that stiction, or break - yes, even operated gently and with mechanical sympathy. I mean, after all, who wants to damage the bracelet on a half-decent watch, for the sake of some cheapo tool.

It's a fallacy to suggest that these break because people either haven't a clue or are too ham-fisted. For some situations, they're simply not sufficiently robust. For many they may be fine - in fact I for plenty of bracelets, I got away with using one of these plastic tools for years without problem.
#25
javz1982
Not the best quality. You get what you pay for.
Mine broke upon 1st use.
Same seller.
MINE TOO, didnt even get the job done the plastic split in two and unrepairable
#26
Wooderson
My watch looks like it has a screw head on the pin, does that mean it will need to be unscrewed rather than pushed out?

Thanks

Are you sure it isn't just a split pin...which looks like a screw?
#27
cornh0l10
Wooderson
My watch looks like it has a screw head on the pin, does that mean it will need to be unscrewed rather than pushed out?

Thanks

Are you sure it isn't just a split pin...which looks like a screw?

Could be - good call. @Wooderson what make of watch is the bracelet on, and is it the stock bracelet?
#28
Bought one of these last time, really cheap quality plastic. It snapped into two pieces!
banned 1 Like #29
Most decent watch straps, will not need much force to remove the pin, as the pins are stepped, meaning that only about 1mm of the pin is bigger than the rest of the pin. This is so you can push the pin in almost to the home position by hand, but the last 1mm is split to make it bigger so it causes an interference fit when pushed fully home.

I have one of these cheap pin removers, it came with 6 spare pins, so far on over 15 watches not broke a single pin yet!

I think the people who claim they are rubbish and break, are not using it correctly. The pins on most watch straps will only push out one way!
#30
rizla01
Some people just dont seem to have a clue when using fragile tools.
The people that have no problem just 'Have a feel' for the job and are able to sense, to a degree, when you are overdoing the expectations of a device, to the point where it will break.
Ham fisted is the polite term.

Treated with respect (Meaning if you get a tight pin or a soft metal pin) EASE it. Dont force it.
Treat it like you would a woman - If it/she's stubborn use lots of persuasion. NOT brute force.
You will win in the end. :)


Either that, or it's just cheap, plastic rubbish. I'll go with the latter.
#31
Bought one and already messaged to say dispatched
#32
damo1972
Most decent watch straps, will not need much force to remove the pin, as the pins are stepped, meaning that only about 1mm of the pin is bigger than the rest of the pin. This is so you can push the pin in almost to the home position by hand, but the last 1mm is split to make it bigger so it causes an interference fit when pushed fully home.

I have one of these cheap pin removers, it came with 6 spare pins, so far on over 15 watches not broke a single pin yet!

I think the people who claim they are rubbish and break, are not using it correctly. The pins on most watch straps will only push out one way!
I've taken links out of plenty of bracelets.

And in an example of where one of these plastic tools broke, it was a bracelet on one of two of the same watches (not £50 cheapie quartz watches with a fancy name on, either). On one bracelet (both were new) one of the pins would reasonably easily move. On the other bracelet, wouldn't budge with the plastic one, it eventually cracked and broke, being gentle, backed off a little, gently tried again.

It was most definitely being pushed the correct direction. And was a pin and collar type arrangement in a solid link bracelet (ie not a folded link bracelet).

I can understand, that for most people, using it they'll possibly not encounter any problems. But with something that just doesn't want to move as easily? They just crack and fall apart.

The metal version manages better.
#33
Ian182
rizla01
Some people just dont seem to have a clue when using fragile tools.
The people that have no problem just 'Have a feel' for the job and are able to sense, to a degree, when you are overdoing the expectations of a device, to the point where it will break.
Ham fisted is the polite term.

Treated with respect (Meaning if you get a tight pin or a soft metal pin) EASE it. Dont force it.
Treat it like you would a woman - If it/she's stubborn use lots of persuasion. NOT brute force.
You will win in the end. :)


Either that, or it's just cheap, plastic rubbish. I'll go with the latter.

Indeed - and in a lot of cases, probably just about good enough.

In others, it will dissappoint or let you down.
#34
Great deal, but I have had dealings with the supplier in the past and i wouldn't touch them with a barge pole.
#35
Lester Burnham
cornh0l10
Wooderson
My watch looks like it has a screw head on the pin, does that mean it will need to be unscrewed rather than pushed out?

Thanks

Are you sure it isn't just a split pin...which looks like a screw?

Could be - good call. @Wooderson what make of watch is the bracelet on, and is it the stock bracelet?

Hi, it's a Rotary with a stock bracelet.
#36
Wooderson
Lester Burnham
cornh0l10
Wooderson
My watch looks like it has a screw head on the pin, does that mean it will need to be unscrewed rather than pushed out?

Thanks

Are you sure it isn't just a split pin...which looks like a screw?

Could be - good call. @Wooderson what make of watch is the bracelet on, and is it the stock bracelet?

Hi, it's a Rotary with a stock bracelet.
I suspect it's more likely a split pin, then.

Should push out in the direction of the arrow.

You can re-evaluate if it doesn't want to budge.
#37
dataload
mad2477
i used to be a jeweller and this looks like it'll do the job just fine

the pins are constantly breaking so beat yourself up about it.
well I've had a £1.99 one off ebay for years and taken out many links without breaking anything

perhaps there's a reason why you aren't a jeweller anymore?

Tempered/hardened metal vs soft metal, I'd have thought.
#38
Potential unlimited profit from this tool if you start your own watch repair business from your garage.

HOT (obviously!)
#39
slickster25
Potential unlimited profit from this tool if you start your own watch repair business from your garage.

HOT (obviously!)

Anyone who decided to do such a thing as something of a cottage industry, would be best served investing in decent tools.

That, plus you'll likely be faced with varying watches with different types of bracelets (this tool is only suitable for bracelets using reasonably easily pushed out pins).

For changing batteries, you'll likely need a whole raft of different case openers, too - and decent ones, customers won't thank you (to say the least...) if you've scratched their watch in order to try and remove the back.
#40
I bought one of these and it worked perfectly on couple of watches. But it doesn't work on RADO WATCHES.

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