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Welby Wrist Blood Pressure Monitor reduced to £1.49 to clear

spraintspraint

Found at my local Aldi in Sutton Coldfield at the till amongst other reduced to sell items. This is from Welby and is model BPM 2007. Contains the usual readings plus 60 storage settings for those who need them. Powered by 2 AAA batteries (supplied), autopowers off for the forgetful and comes with a hard white case.

No link to the offer, unfortunately, as this is instore only, but have a pic from ebay from somebody selling the same product.

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All Comments (13)

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    BEANZ-ON-TOAST
    Great price. I have a similar one, different brand. It is very accurate. It shows puls rate as well, looks like this one does as well. Voted hot as a really good price
    n1ragab2004
    I have one of those, brilliant accuracy, I have calibrated mineat the hospital devices and it is very accurate with identical readings like that in the hospital devices,
    Hot Deal:)
    test123
    thats a good price, i bought not so long ago for 4.99
    Sunni
    I don't recommend this. Wrist BP machines are very inaccurate.

    To get accurate readings of your BP, you need an arm one. Preferbly the Omron brand.
    chaffordred
    Sunni
    I don't recommend this. Wrist BP machines are very inaccurate.

    To get accurate readings of your BP, you need an arm one. Preferbly the Omron brand.


    Very true. I have an Omron arm monitor that I got from Costco for around £30.00. It's similar to the one at my doctors office, which is Omron too. My doctor and the British Hypertension Society recommend this for Automatic Digital Blood Pressure Home use.

    If you want an accurate reading, this is the way to go.
    Robbieeee2k
    BEANZ-ON-TOAST
    Great price. I have a similar one, different brand. It is very accurate. It shows puls rate as well, looks like this one does as well. Voted hot as a really good price


    Just a quick question - how do you know it is accurate? :-)
    spraint
    Just a note on the accuracy comments, since blanket statements that 'wrist monitors are inaccurate' are misleading IMHO.

    Omrom makes wrist monitors, too. The fact that the wrist rather than the arm is used is no indicator of the accuracy of the reading or the capability of the instrument. The underlying technology is the same, no matter how much you pay for your monitor.

    Accuracy of readings can be influenced by a number of things, including:

    1. Position of the sleeve - ideally at the level of the heart, which is why arm sleeves are in theory preferable to the wrist. If you remember to keep your arm up, your reading should be the same.
    2. Time of day - your blood pressure changes throughout the day.
    3. Your state of relaxation - obviously not after stress or strenuous excercise, unless that is what you want to measure.

    For what it is worth, I compared my reading with our Omrom sleeve monitor (recommended by the doctor, I wonder if they get a commission?) with this. Pretty much the same reading. The main difference is that this wrist reader is quicker and less unpleasant to use as it seems to need to exert less pressure to cut off blood flow on the wrist. As always, YMMV.
    jassidhillon
    spraint
    Just a note on the accuracy comments, since blanket statements that 'wrist monitors are inaccurate' are misleading IMHO.

    Omrom makes wrist monitors, too. The fact that the wrist rather than the arm is used is no indicator of the accuracy of the reading or the capability of the instrument. The underlying technology is the same, no matter how much you pay for your monitor.

    Accuracy of readings can be influenced by a number of things, including:

    1. Position of the sleeve - ideally at the level of the heart, which is why arm sleeves are in theory preferable to the wrist. If you remember to keep your arm up, your reading should be the same.
    2. Time of day - your blood pressure changes throughout the day.
    3. Your state of relaxation - obviously not after stress or strenuous excercise, unless that is what you want to measure.

    For what it is worth, I compared my reading with our Omrom sleeve monitor (recommended by the doctor, I wonder if they get a commission?) with this. Pretty much the same reading. The main difference is that this wrist reader is quicker and less unpleasant to use as it seems to need to exert less pressure to cut off blood flow on the wrist. As always, YMMV.


    Do we have a doctor in the house here as this nerdish talk is all too freaky!!:thinking:
    johnnyshuttle
    Might buy one to try when i'm in bed;-)
    Sunni
    spraint
    Just a note on the accuracy comments, since blanket statements that 'wrist monitors are inaccurate' are misleading IMHO.

    Omrom makes wrist monitors, too. The fact that the wrist rather than the arm is used is no indicator of the accuracy of the reading or the capability of the instrument. The underlying technology is the same, no matter how much you pay for your monitor.

    Accuracy of readings can be influenced by a number of things, including:

    1. Position of the sleeve - ideally at the level of the heart, which is why arm sleeves are in theory preferable to the wrist. If you remember to keep your arm up, your reading should be the same.
    2. Time of day - your blood pressure changes throughout the day.
    3. Your state of relaxation - obviously not after stress or strenuous excercise, unless that is what you want to measure.

    For what it is worth, I compared my reading with our Omrom sleeve monitor (recommended by the doctor, I wonder if they get a commission?) with this. Pretty much the same reading. The main difference is that this wrist reader is quicker and less unpleasant to use as it seems to need to exert less pressure to cut off blood flow on the wrist. As always, YMMV.


    Some valid points, but no doctors don't get commission by recommending the Oron brand. It is simply recommended because they give accurate results. In fact, if someone has several readings taken from a wrist BP machine, the recordings are usually ignored and they are told to go buy an arm machine.

    Wrist machines are cheap for a reason - because doctors don't recommend them and therefore very people actually buy them.
    spraint
    Sunni
    Wrist machines are cheap for a reason - because doctors don't recommend them and therefore very people actually buy them.


    Which raises the question - why do manufacturers make them, advertise them and put them on sale if nobody rates them or even buys them? Please note that wrist monitors are not that much cheaper in the main than arm monitors. You can lop off a couple of quid for smaller sleeves and lcd displays, but that is usually it.

    As I stated, even Omrom makes and advertises wrist monitors, so if we are to take your generalisation as a statement of fact, then we would have to conclude that: (a) Omrom monitors are all very inaccurate (since this cheap monitor gives the same results as the pricier Omrom that we own), (b) doctors that recommend Omrom do not know what they are talking about, since Omrom is apparently peddling inaccurate monitors, thus compromising its reputation or (c) there is something wrong with your statement above.

    From what I can see googling around, spending more gives you more features, such as predictive body state, display options, memory settings and the like rather than any difference in the underlying technology employed. It's probably the same microchip circuit in all monitors these days.

    IMHO the (in)accuracy of readings does not lie in the mechanics of the equipment used, but in the interpretation of these, which is why the quacks always want you in for a second opinion if you get a worrying reading.
    Sunni
    spraint
    Which raises the question - why do manufacturers make them, advertise them and put them on sale if nobody rates them or even buys them? Please note that wrist monitors are not that much cheaper in the main than arm monitors. You can lop off a couple of quid for smaller sleeves and lcd displays, but that is usually it.

    Because wrist monitors are generally easier to put on and use than an arm BP machine. Wrist machines are really only adequate for one thing - to record change in BP over time. The readings themselves will usually always be inaccurate, but if a wrist BP machines shows a change in BP, then you know you should get yourself down to the doctor.

    spraint
    As I stated, even Omrom makes and advertises wrist monitors, so if we are to take your generalisation as a statement of fact, then we would have to conclude that: (a) Omrom monitors are all very inaccurate (since this cheap monitor gives the same results as the pricier Omrom that we own), (b) doctors that recommend Omrom do not know what they are talking about, since Omrom is apparently peddling inaccurate monitors, thus compromising its reputation or (c) there is something wrong with your statement above.

    Firstly, it's Omron, not Omrom. Secondly doctors do not recommend "get an Omron monitor", they say get an arm BP machine, preferbly of the Omron brand.

    spraint
    From what I can see googling around, spending more gives you more features, such as predictive body state, display options, memory settings and the like rather than any difference in the underlying technology employed. It's probably the same microchip circuit in all monitors these days.

    The electronics of it doesn't really matter much. Yes, more money and you get more features. But the bread and butter of a mobile phone is to make calls. Similarly, a BP machine is designed to take BP. What gives accurate and inaccurate results is WHERE you place the cuff, so yes, there is a big difference between placing it on the arm or wrist, or the leg, etc.

    spraint
    IMHO the (in)accuracy of readings does not lie in the mechanics of the equipment used, but in the interpretation of these, which is why the quacks always want you in for a second opinion if you get a worrying reading.

    The 'quacks' want you in for a second reading because that is what the BHF guidelines say. If you think a doctor should start you on anti hypertensive medication for life and give you impotence as a side effect based on one single insolated high BP reading, then I recommend you go see a shrink.
    spraint
    Sunni
    . If you think a doctor should start you on anti hypertensive medication for life and give you impotence as a side effect based on one single insolated high BP reading, then I recommend you go see a shrink.


    No, of course I don't. Obviously, the right course of action on such a reading is to cut your arms open and let some blood to relieve the pressure, like in the olden days. Way to extrapolate the opposite of what clearly was implied in what I wrote.

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