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Free Libre Office @ Libre Office

arduino Avatar
5y, 10m agoFound 5 years, 10 months ago
LibreOffice is a comprehensive, professional-quality productivity suite that you can download and install for free. There is a large base of satisfied LibreOffice users worldwide, and it's available in more than 30 languages and for all major operating systems, including Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X and Linux (Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, Mandriva, Suse, ...).

You can download, install and distribute LibreOffice freely, with no fear of copyright infringement.
What's outstanding about LibreOffice?

LibreOffice is a feature-packed and mature desktop productivity package with some really great advantages:

* It's free – no worry about license costs.
* No language barriers – it's available in a large number of languages, with more being added continually.
* LGPL public license – you can use it, customize it, hack it and copy it with free user support and developer support from our active worldwide community and our large and experienced developer team.
* LibreOffice is an Open Source community-driven project: development is open to new talent and new ideas, and our software is tested and used daily by a large and devoted user community; you, too, can get involved and influence its future development.

LibreOffice gives you high quality:

* The roots of LibreOffice go back 20 years. This long history means it's a stable and functional product.
* Thousands of users worldwide regularly take part in beta testing of new LibreOffice versions.
* Because the development process is completely open, LibreOffice has been extensively tested by security experts, giving you security and peace of mind.

LibreOffice is user-friendly:

* You get a simple-to-use yet powerful interface that is easy to personalize – Microsoft Office users will find the switch easy and painless, with a familiar look and feel.
* Compatible with all major competitors' file formats. You can easily import files from Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint and many other formats, and can easily save to Microsoft Office and other formats when needed.
* LibreOffice is supported by a big worldwide community: volunteers help newcomers, and advanced users and developers can collaborate with you to find solutions to complex issues.

What does LibreOffice give you?

Writer is the word processor inside LibreOffice. Use it for everything, from dashing off a quick letter to producing an entire book with tables of contents, embedded illustrations, bibliographies and diagrams. The while-you-type auto-completion, auto-formatting and automatic spelling checking make difficult tasks easy (but are easy to disable if you prefer). Writer is powerful enough to tackle desktop publishing tasks such as creating multi-column newsletters and brochures. The only limit is your imagination.

Calc tames your numbers and helps with difficult decisions when you're weighing the alternatives. Analyze your data with Calc and then use it to present your final output. Charts and analysis tools help bring transparency to your conclusions. A fully-integrated help system makes easier work of entering complex formulas. Add data from external databases such as SQL or Oracle, then sort and filter them to produce statistical analyses. Use the graphing functions to display large number of 2D and 3D graphics from 13 categories, including line, area, bar, pie, X-Y, and net – with the dozens of variations available, you're sure to find one that suits your project.

Impress is the fastest and easiest way to create effective multimedia presentations. Stunning animation and sensational special effects help you convince your audience. Create presentations that look even more professional than the standard presentations you commonly see at work. Get your collegues' and bosses' attention by creating something a little bit different.

Draw lets you build diagrams and sketches from scratch. A picture is worth a thousand words, so why not try something simple with box and line diagrams? Or else go further and easily build dynamic 3D illustrations and special effects. It's as simple or as powerful as you want it to be.

Base is the database front-end of the LibreOffice suite. With Base, you can seamlessly integrate into your existing database structures. Based on imported and linked tables and queries from MySQL, PostgreSQL or Microsoft Access and many other data sources, you can build powerful databases containing forms, reports, views and queries. Full integration is possible with the in-built HSQL database.

Math is a simple equation editor that lets you lay-out and display your mathematical, chemical, electrical or scientific equations quickly in standard written notation. Even the most-complex calculations can be understandable when displayed correctly. E=mc2.

LibreOffice also comes configured with a PDF file creator, meaning you can distribute documents that you're sure can be opened and read by users of almost any computing device or operating system.

All Comments

(32) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
Clickable links:

Website: http://www.libreoffice.org/
Download (HUKDs doesn't cope with it for some reason): http://www.libreoffice.org/download/
Wikipedia Entry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LibreOffice

Edited By: arduino on Jan 25, 2011 14:06
#2
Mods, can the devs please fix the problem the site has displaying png files? Thanks
2 Likes #3
There's an explanation about how this project grew out of openoffice on wikipedia. I hadn't heard of libreoffice before, but I can see it has an outstanding pedigree.
#4
"LibreOffice - Windows, Mac, Linux, BSD, UNIX (from many of the people behind OpenOffice)"

There are not LibreOffice for BSD as I know. I am a FreeBSD user and looks like that we will wait for LibreOffice long time...
#5
thanks
#6
why is this better than openoffice?
#7
dwl99
why is this better than openoffice?


I think if you read the wikipedia entry I linked to that should answer your question.
#8
arduino
dwl99
why is this better than openoffice?


I think if you read the wikipedia entry I linked to that should answer your question.


I did & I can't see any significant differences. Can anyone who has used both applications give any feedback?
#9
dwl99
arduino
dwl99
why is this better than openoffice?


I think if you read the wikipedia entry I linked to that should answer your question.


I did & I can't see any significant differences. Can anyone who has used both applications give any feedback?


It's made mostly by the same people who once made open office, Oracle bought Sun, OpenOffice (was sponsored by Sun) may be discontinued by Oracle in the same way that OpenSolaris (was also sponsored by Sun) was.

LibreOffice is now being activly developed, these developers aren't working on OpenOffice anymore. Many distros are switching to LibreOffice for their next release. The article also mentions improvements to the code base from previously forked versions of OpenOffice. Are you sure you read the wiki article? :

In reviewing LibreOffice 3.3.0 stable on the day of its release Ryan Paul of Ars Technica said, "It introduces a number of noteworthy new features and there are improvements throughout the included applications. More significantly, the release reflects the growing strength of the nascent LibreOffice project...The new features included in LibreOffice 3.3 improve the office suite's feature set, usability, and interoperability with other formats. For example, it has improved support for importing documents from Lotus Word Pro and Microsoft Works. Another key new feature is the ability to import SVG content and edit SVG images in LibreOffice Draw."[16]


Given that it's free, and you could argue anyone elses opinion is subjective, why not download it, try it and answer your own question?

Edited By: arduino on Jan 26, 2011 12:30
#10
Can you just download certain parts, like the word processor..or is it like open office, where you have to d/l the whole thing?
#11
hermano2
Can you just download certain parts, like the word processor..or is it like open office, where you have to d/l the whole thing?


It would have taken you less time to look at the download page and find out the answer for yourself that it would to post here and wait for someone to tell you. Lazy.
#12
Is it less bloated than OpenOffice and do you have to manually prevent it auto-starting a quick start process (like OpenOffice) ?
#13
LibreOffice is rubbish. It's for geeks. ;)

http://paradoxdgn.com/junk/avatars/trollface.jpg


Edited By: Jeff on Jan 27, 2011 15:41
#14
Jeff
LibreOffice is rubbish. It's for geeks. ;)

Sham by name sham by nature. Keep on trollin'

Edited By: arduino on Jan 27, 2011 16:24
#15
0762
Is it less bloated than OpenOffice and do you have to manually prevent it auto-starting a quick start process (like OpenOffice) ?


Yes, it's less bloated and performance has been improved. The Quick start thing doesn't happen to me on linux. IIRC it always was optional in Windows anyway.
#16
Like Openoffice, I'm sure it's perfectly functional for most people. But why do they insist on making the interface on these look so old? From the screen shots it looks like Word 95 etc. It can't be that hard to make it look a bit more modern?

It's a trivial point but it's one of the reasons I still use MS Office.
#17
callum9999
Like Openoffice, I'm sure it's perfectly functional for most people. But why do they insist on making the interface on these look so old? From the screen shots it looks like Word 95 etc. It can't be that hard to make it look a bit more modern?

It's a trivial point but it's one of the reasons I still use MS Office.


I think it looks good, they care about useability as well how 'nice' it looks. It's also customisable. It looks nothing like Word 95.

Since it's an open source project, feel free to contribute to improve the product.

Unless you're a student or a teacher you can't get Microsoft office for under £150. Hardly comprable to something that's free does pretty much everything 95% of users need or want it to do.

Edited By: arduino on Jan 31, 2011 11:23
#18
arduino
callum9999
Like Openoffice, I'm sure it's perfectly functional for most people. But why do they insist on making the interface on these look so old? From the screen shots it looks like Word 95 etc. It can't be that hard to make it look a bit more modern?

It's a trivial point but it's one of the reasons I still use MS Office.


I think it looks good, they care about useability as well how 'nice' it looks. It's also customisable. It looks nothing like Word 95.

Since it's an open source project, feel free to contribute to improve the product.

Unless you're a student or a teacher you can't get Microsoft office for under £150. Hardly comprable to something that's free does pretty much everything 95% of users need or want it to do.


I just looked up Word 95 and it doesn't look hugely different to me. Like I said, it's trivial to many people but I just hate the interface on it and would rather pay for MS Office. (Not that it's a direct clone of the features in MS Office, most of the important ones yes but office is still better in some respects anyway). I also found open office dreadful for formatting .doc documents - it rarely handled one without messing it all up for me (though maybe that's improved in this version?).

You can get the home and student edition for £50 on Amazon (it say's it's not for commercial use, nothing about having to be a student).
1 Like #19
Erm, £50 vs free - I know which I'd rather go with if it's to just type out a letter :)
#20
sirclive
Erm, £50 vs free - I know which I'd rather go with if it's to just type out a letter :)


I don't type letters, and good for you... Many people obviously don't agree with you, hence why MS Office earns Microsoft so much money.
#21
callum9999
sirclive
Erm, £50 vs free - I know which I'd rather go with if it's to just type out a letter :)


I don't type letters, and good for you... Many people obviously don't agree with you, hence why MS Office earns Microsoft so much money.


Actually, many Microsoft products lose money selling to individuals (especially operating systems) and only make money from selling (both the liscences and support contracts) to large organisations.

Edited By: arduino on Feb 01, 2011 10:11
#22
arduino
callum9999
sirclive
Erm, £50 vs free - I know which I'd rather go with if it's to just type out a letter :)


I don't type letters, and good for you... Many people obviously don't agree with you, hence why MS Office earns Microsoft so much money.


Actually, many Microsoft products lose money selling to individuals (especially operating systems) and only make money from selling (both the liscences and support contracts) to large organisations.


I fail to see how they can possibly lose money by selling something that's already been developed to extra people. Yes, the home market may not be enough to cover the development cost, but it's still an important source of income.
#23
callum9999
arduino
callum9999
sirclive
Erm, £50 vs free - I know which I'd rather go with if it's to just type out a letter :)


I don't type letters, and good for you... Many people obviously don't agree with you, hence why MS Office earns Microsoft so much money.


Actually, many Microsoft products lose money selling to individuals (especially operating systems) and only make money from selling (both the liscences and support contracts) to large organisations.


I fail to see how they can possibly lose money by selling something that's already been developed to extra people. Yes, the home market may not be enough to cover the development cost, but it's still an important source of income.


Trust me, I worked for them for many years, if they were to try and sell you Windows at the price it cost to develop, test, package, market and support, you wouldn't be running it.

Edited By: arduino on Feb 01, 2011 16:09
#24
arduino
callum9999
arduino
callum9999
sirclive
Erm, £50 vs free - I know which I'd rather go with if it's to just type out a letter :)


I don't type letters, and good for you... Many people obviously don't agree with you, hence why MS Office earns Microsoft so much money.


Actually, many Microsoft products lose money selling to individuals (especially operating systems) and only make money from selling (both the liscences and support contracts) to large organisations.


I fail to see how they can possibly lose money by selling something that's already been developed to extra people. Yes, the home market may not be enough to cover the development cost, but it's still an important source of income.


Trust me, I worked for them for many years, if they were to try and sell you Windows at the price it cost to develop, test, package, market and support, you wouldn't be running it.


Yes but the logic is more a case of, if selling Windows and Office to the businesses makes them enough to cover the development costs, testing costs etc etc, then surely any other sales, like to a customer, is still profit? The only additional costs that a £50 sale of Office to a home user will generate is production and support costs, neither of which would cost £50 each.
#25
Spence1115
arduino
callum9999
arduino
callum9999
sirclive
Erm, £50 vs free - I know which I'd rather go with if it's to just type out a letter :)


I don't type letters, and good for you... Many people obviously don't agree with you, hence why MS Office earns Microsoft so much money.


Actually, many Microsoft products lose money selling to individuals (especially operating systems) and only make money from selling (both the liscences and support contracts) to large organisations.


I fail to see how they can possibly lose money by selling something that's already been developed to extra people. Yes, the home market may not be enough to cover the development cost, but it's still an important source of income.


Trust me, I worked for them for many years, if they were to try and sell you Windows at the price it cost to develop, test, package, market and support, you wouldn't be running it.


Yes but the logic is more a case of, if selling Windows and Office to the businesses makes them enough to cover the development costs, testing costs etc etc, then surely any other sales, like to a customer, is still profit? The only additional costs that a £50 sale of Office to a home user will generate is production and support costs, neither of which would cost £50 each.


No, selling the software to businesses doesn't make them the profit, this hasn't been the case for them since windows for workgroups. Selling support contracts to businesses does. Your also discounting many metrics such as supporting millions of home PCs by providing patches and service packs, including the infrastructure to do all this, the 24/7 support, all the numpties they have in call centers round the world etc....

If you know anything about software houses this wouldn't be a surprise to you.

Edited By: arduino on Feb 03, 2011 09:39
1 Like #26
callum9999
Like Openoffice, I'm sure it's perfectly functional for most people. But why do they insist on making the interface on these look so old? From the screen shots it looks like Word 95 etc. It can't be that hard to make it look a bit more modern?

It's a trivial point but it's one of the reasons I still use MS Office.


Well yes they could have made it very flashy with a 3D interface and opaque effects, but why? It under minds what the project is about. It's about function, accessibility and being free to all.

While yes I'm sure they could make something fancy for your sandy bridge system, but what about the millions of poor people round the world using Pentium 4's and older with only 256mb or less of ram? So yes you could show your friends a 3D revolving interface at 120FPS, but now the poor African cant database the village animals and cant write a letter to ask for funds for a well or for medication for its people?

Edited By: GAVINLEWISHUKD on Feb 03, 2011 10:21
1 Like #27
Yes - the problem MS has is they need you to keep buying new versions of Office to keep the revenues flowing. They are the prisoners of their past success.

Hence there is an element of change for change's sake in MS Office.

And you can't stop people buying it. I've tried with people who write an occasional basic document. MS Office has a place if you need complete and guaranteed compatibility with fancy work done in the corporate office. In which case they, not you, should be paying fot it.

For most other uses OO/LO is the answer for free. And LO 3.3 I am glad to report has unwrinkled some of the regressions in OO 3.2. And is the future for 'open' office applications.
1 Like #28
Hopefully this is the year of OpenSource.
#29
arduino
Spence1115
arduino
callum9999
arduino
callum9999
sirclive
Erm, £50 vs free - I know which I'd rather go with if it's to just type out a letter :)


I don't type letters, and good for you... Many people obviously don't agree with you, hence why MS Office earns Microsoft so much money.


Actually, many Microsoft products lose money selling to individuals (especially operating systems) and only make money from selling (both the liscences and support contracts) to large organisations.


I fail to see how they can possibly lose money by selling something that's already been developed to extra people. Yes, the home market may not be enough to cover the development cost, but it's still an important source of income.


Trust me, I worked for them for many years, if they were to try and sell you Windows at the price it cost to develop, test, package, market and support, you wouldn't be running it.


Yes but the logic is more a case of, if selling Windows and Office to the businesses makes them enough to cover the development costs, testing costs etc etc, then surely any other sales, like to a customer, is still profit? The only additional costs that a £50 sale of Office to a home user will generate is production and support costs, neither of which would cost £50 each.


No, selling the software to businesses doesn't make them the profit, this hasn't been the case for them since windows for workgroups. Selling support contracts to businesses does. Your also discounting many metrics such as supporting millions of home PCs by providing patches and service packs, including the infrastructure to do all this, the 24/7 support, all the numpties they have in call centers round the world etc....

If you know anything about software houses this wouldn't be a surprise to you.

You're talking absolute sh*t. MS makes barrels of cash from Windows and Office.
To suggest MS don't make money (let alone the insane profit they make) on selling Office to primarily businesses, then its _you_ who doesn't know anything about software houses.
As someone who has to budget for IT spends, I can tell you that the cost of Office is one of the biggest spending decisions we make every few years when they upgrade it.
Here is a graph to help you:
http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-microsoft-operating-income-by-division-2010-2
#30
callum9999
arduino
callum9999
sirclive
Erm, £50 vs free - I know which I'd rather go with if it's to just type out a letter :)


I don't type letters, and good for you... Many people obviously don't agree with you, hence why MS Office earns Microsoft so much money.


Actually, many Microsoft products lose money selling to individuals (especially operating systems) and only make money from selling (both the liscences and support contracts) to large organisations.


I fail to see how they can possibly lose money by selling something that's already been developed to extra people. Yes, the home market may not be enough to cover the development cost, but it's still an important source of income.

Callum, dont get in a "tit for tat" with Open Source advocates, logic and reason go out the window when they want to rant on about something.
Like you (and the reason most businesses stick with genuine MS) is the document formats.
And you're right, Open Office and Libre Office look like 1990s software from yesteryear.
I always crack open Open Office from time to time to see how they are getting on, but just like Linux, its good, but not quiet good enough.
#31
Jeff
LibreOffice is rubbish. It's for geeks. ;)

http://paradoxdgn.com/junk/avatars/trollface.jpg


Why for geeks? Libre office is "virtually" identical to Office 2003, even opens Office 2007 docs and excel spreadsheets.
#32
arduino


If you know anything about software houses this wouldn't be a surprise to you.

Funny, this news article came out today as well:
http://money.cnn.com/2011/04/28/technology/microsoft_earnings/index.htm

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