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lumoruk Avatar
banned9y, 1m agoPosted 9 years, 1 month ago
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lumoruk Avatar
banned9y, 1m agoPosted 9 years, 1 month ago
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#1
Sounds like you've got air in the system.
1 Like #2
Air in the pipes.

Bleed the radiators.

Answerbank is better for questions like this

http://www.theanswerbank.co.uk/
#3
insulate pipework and clip pipework, it seems like when liftng up the floorboards you must of loosened them
#4
Sounds to me like you've lifted the floorboards and accidentally flushed the combi boiler system. I would suggest to refill it.




Ok you already have done.
banned#5
check out the forums under [url]www.screwfix.com[/url]

ideal for helpful advice from the pros.
#6
sounds like air in the system we've had the sam problem since or combi boiler was replaced. We found bleading all the raidiators then draining from the radiator furthest from the boiler stopped the problem. Just make sure you have a bucket cos you need to remove a whole heep of water!!
banned#7
quite easy to fix air in the system.

locate drain plug on system and attach a hose to it (normally on visible radiator pipework downstairs)

turn mains water off

open valve on drain plug

then start bleeding radiators from the top of the dwelling down once water level has fallen below bleeding holes in each radiator.

once emptied, turn valve off and turn mains on (good idea to add anti-corrosion mix into cold tank at this stage too)

then get ready to turn off bleeding holes in each radiator (bottom of house upwards this time) one radiatior is refilled.

Any plumber reading this is sure to point out anything I've missed.
#8
csiman
quite easy to fix air in the system.

locate drain plug on system and attach a hose to it (normally on visible radiator pipework downstairs)

turn mains water off

open valve on drain plug

then start bleeding radiators from the top of the dwelling down once water level has fallen below bleeding holes in each radiator.

once emptied, turn valve off and turn mains on (good idea to add anti-corrosion mix into cold tank at this stage too)

then get ready to turn off bleeding holes in each radiator (bottom of house upwards this time) one radiatior is refilled.

Any plumber reading this is sure to point out anything I've missed.



I'm not a plumber, but I don't know why you need to open the drain plug and attempt to bleed the system whilst still adding air to the system? :? :thinking:
#9
I have a similar problem, but appears to be nothing to do with my central heating. When I flush my upstairs toilet it makes a really loud noise from downstairs (which would be near my boiler) when the toilet finishes refilling. Only does this with the upstairs toilet though.

Any suggestions ?
1 Like #10
alictait
I have a similar problem, but appears to be nothing to do with my central heating. When I flush my upstairs toilet it makes a really loud noise from downstairs (which would be near my boiler) when the toilet finishes refilling. Only does this with the upstairs toilet though.

Any suggestions ?


Again, it sounds like you've got an air-lock.

It usually happens after an install/meddling etc, if it has started happening for no apparent reason, then I haven't a clue. :thinking:
#11
Yeah started for no apparent reason, All Radiators are nice n bled regularly, very strange - and annoying, don't flush the loo after bedtime as it wakes up house !!!
#12
alictait
I have a similar problem, but appears to be nothing to do with my central heating. When I flush my upstairs toilet it makes a really loud noise from downstairs (which would be near my boiler) when the toilet finishes refilling. Only does this with the upstairs toilet though.

Any suggestions ?


I'm no Derek Acorah but I think you may have a ghost in your house!
#13
I used to work in a hospital and would often get problems removing air.

Now I am NOT saying do this at home.

But I used to get a fire hose and attach it to a radiator for heating or a tap for hotwater and turn the hose on feeding the water the oposite way to normall.

The thing you have to be carfull of is over filling the tank so fast that the overfolw cant cope and it floods the building.

Never had it happen but hospitals are large places with very large tanks and overflow pipes.

In my home I have one radiator that can be dificult to get the air out, so what I do is turn the pump speed up high and go to that radiator and let lots of water out, if it spurts and splutters thats a good sign and once it has stopped the air should be gone.

Restore pump to the speed it was before.
[mod]#14
alictait;1375073
I have a similar problem, but appears to be nothing to do with my central heating. When I flush my upstairs toilet it makes a really loud noise from downstairs (which would be near my boiler) when the toilet finishes refilling. Only does this with the upstairs toilet though.

Any suggestions ?


Right your problem is easy fixed, change the ballvalve in the upstairs toilet. Its shutting off quickly at the end of fill and causing something called pipe hammer. You can prove the point by flushing it and with the lid off slow down the ball when its shutting (near full) so it shuts off slower, no noise from anywhere else now I bet. Also you could, if there is a service valve in the pipework leading to the toilet throttle this down which will slow down the refill and maybe stop the problem without having to change the ballvalve.

As to the original posters problem with noisy pipes, he says he has a combi boiler, if so he has no tank in the loft to top up or drain from. Its a completely sealed system with just rads and the boiler in circuit. He doesn't say how lifting some floorboards managed to partially drain his system, so we are left guessing on that, but he should have topped up the system from a special filling loop off the cold mains under the boiler until about 1 to 1.5 bar shows on the pressure gauge (see the manual for your boiler for their recommended pressure) then turn off and remove the filling loop. Any air trapped in the heads of rads can be bled off but you need to keep an eye on the pressure to keep topping up in between venting rads as your venting will drop the pressure again so top up after each rad venting. Do this with a cold system is best and then recheck the pressure once the system is hot.
The noises should now be gone as its air banging around the pipework.
#15
donnydude
I'm no Derek Acorah but I think you may have a ghost in your house!



Better not tell the wife, mind you it would explain a lot, now where did I leave that sheet ?
#16
MikeT
Right your problem is easy fixed, change the ballvalve in the upstairs toilet. Its shutting off quickly at the end of fill and causing something called pipe hammer. You can prove the point by flushing it and with the lid off slow down the ball when its shutting (near full) so it shuts off slower, no noise from anywhere else now I bet. Also you could, if there is a service valve in the pipework leading to the toilet throttle this down which will slow down the refill and maybe stop the problem without having to change the ballvalve.

As to the original posters problem with noisy pipes, he says he has a combi boiler, if so he has no tank in the loft to top up or drain from. Its a completely sealed system with just rads and the boiler in circuit. He doesn't say how lifting some floorboards managed to partially drain his system, so we are left guessing on that, but he should have topped up the system from a special filling loop off the cold mains under the boiler until about 1 to 1.5 bar shows on the pressure gauge (see the manual for your boiler for their recommended pressure) then turn off and remove the filling loop. Any air trapped in the heads of rads can be bled off but you need to keep an eye on the pressure to keep topping up in between venting rads as your venting will drop the pressure again so top up after each rad venting. Do this with a cold system is best and then recheck the pressure once the system is hot.
The noises should now be gone as its air banging around the pipework.


Thanks again Mike - Now are you sure you don't work for dell (2nd time you have helped me today !!!)
[mod]#17
alictait;1376147
Thanks again Mike - Now are you sure you don't work for dell (2nd time you have helped me today !!!)


Yes, I do their plumbing :whistling:
[mod]#18
lumoruk;1376378
Thanks everyone....
MikeT I've done as everyone has suggested and bled the radiators (bloody stank) plus what you said about keeping the pressure up. The banging has now stopped but i don't understand why you have to remove the filling loop, it was attached when I moved in. Is there a reason for removing it? The boiler's loop at work was attached for 3 years but has since been removed by an engineer. Thanks rep to 70% of you :thumbsup:


Removal of the loop is local water board regs, Its possible in some circumstances to end up in a position where your feeding your dirty rad water back down the cold main. Highly unlikely I know but its a regulation and any heating or water engineer attending your home will disconnect it.
The smell btw was from the rust inhibitor introduced into the closed system when the boiler/rads were installed to stop corrosion of the rads from the water/air mix. Now you have partly drained and refilled the concentration of inhibitor may be below the strength needed to protect your system, but introducing more of that is a whole new kettle of fish!
Glad its fixed anyway:thumbsup:

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