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4K TV's are old! 8K is in! Prepare you eyes!

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Source: IGN Sharp unveiled its new line of 4K TVs at CES 2015, with prices starting around $750 for a 43-inch and ranging up to $6,000 for an 80-inch. Among Sharp's upcoming TVs is the massive, …
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2y, 2m agoPosted 2 years, 2 months ago
Source: IGN

Sharp unveiled its new line of 4K TVs at CES 2015, with prices starting around $750 for a 43-inch and ranging up to $6,000 for an 80-inch.

Among Sharp's upcoming TVs is the massive, 80-inch AQUOS 4K UHD TV, a television that uses Quattron and pixel-splitting technology to reach a near-8K resolution of 7680x4320. According to Sharp, that's 42 million subpixels more than the standard 4K resolution of 3840x2160, reports The Verge.

Even though video content that can effectively utilize the massive boost in resolution is rare, Sharp has included improved upscaling technology so 4K and 1080p content can still take advantage of all the extra pixels.

Sharp has also improved its traditional line of 4K TVs. The UB30, one of its cheapest sets, comes in 43, 50, 55, and 60-inches and starts at $750. The UE30 comes in the range of 60, 70, and 80-inches, while the UH30 only comes in 70 and 80-inches. The latter two models will run on the Android TV platform.
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2y, 2m agoPosted 2 years, 2 months ago
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#1
#2
old news
8 Likes #3
Among Sharp's upcoming TVs is the massive, 80-inch AQUOS 4K UHD TV, a television that uses Quattron and pixel-splitting technology to reach a near-8K


End of the day though, so what? Most people probably couldn't tell the difference between 720p and 1080p unless they put their nose up against the screen. Source : I'm one of them :p
banned#4
720p is alright, 1080p is great and 4K even better. My eyes aren't brilliant by I can tell the difference between all three but I think 4K to 8K isn't going to do anything for me as current display technology stands.

One thing 8K will be good for however is VR.
#5
TV's and media players are taking a while to catch up my sons been using 8k cameras for about 4 years now at college and now uni and I'm sure he said they have 16k cameras there.
banned#6
stefromuk
TV's and media players are taking a while to catch up my sons been using 8k cameras for about 4 years now at college and now uni and I'm sure he said they have 16k cameras there.

They may shoot at 8K but the final thing usually ends up at a lower resolution - as you can crop an 8K image down quite a lot in order to crop unwanted things out of scenes, zoom in a little - and still retain 4K (or 1080p) image quality.
#7
KillFelix
stefromuk
TV's and media players are taking a while to catch up my sons been using 8k cameras for about 4 years now at college and now uni and I'm sure he said they have 16k cameras there.

They may shoot at 8K but the final thing usually ends up at a lower resolution - as you can crop an 8K image down quite a lot in order to crop unwanted things out of scenes, zoom in a little - and still retain 4K (or 1080p) image quality.

Or just get the shot right in the first place.
banned#8
rev6
KillFelix
stefromuk
TV's and media players are taking a while to catch up my sons been using 8k cameras for about 4 years now at college and now uni and I'm sure he said they have 16k cameras there.

They may shoot at 8K but the final thing usually ends up at a lower resolution - as you can crop an 8K image down quite a lot in order to crop unwanted things out of scenes, zoom in a little - and still retain 4K (or 1080p) image quality.

Or just get the shot right in the first place.

Easier to sort in post-production. Most things that need editing in post are unforseen during shooting.
#9
KillFelix
rev6
KillFelix
stefromuk
TV's and media players are taking a while to catch up my sons been using 8k cameras for about 4 years now at college and now uni and I'm sure he said they have 16k cameras there.

They may shoot at 8K but the final thing usually ends up at a lower resolution - as you can crop an 8K image down quite a lot in order to crop unwanted things out of scenes, zoom in a little - and still retain 4K (or 1080p) image quality.

Or just get the shot right in the first place.

Easier to sort in post-production. Most things that need editing in post are unforseen during shooting.

But that means when remastered for 8k eventually, they'll either have to use the pre cut with whatever they cropped, or crop and upscale.
banned 1 Like #10
rev6
KillFelix
rev6
KillFelix
stefromuk
TV's and media players are taking a while to catch up my sons been using 8k cameras for about 4 years now at college and now uni and I'm sure he said they have 16k cameras there.

They may shoot at 8K but the final thing usually ends up at a lower resolution - as you can crop an 8K image down quite a lot in order to crop unwanted things out of scenes, zoom in a little - and still retain 4K (or 1080p) image quality.

Or just get the shot right in the first place.

Easier to sort in post-production. Most things that need editing in post are unforseen during shooting.

But that means when remastered for 8k eventually, they'll either have to use the pre cut with whatever they cropped, or crop and upscale.

They'll use different techniques to make today's 4K video upscale to 8/16K. There'll be some sort of pixel interpolation or something magic they'll use to make a 4K image appear sharper than it was originally filmed.

They'll have a tough time marketing 4K to the masses but 8K will be even tougher. I'm guessing 8K will be just for enthusiasts as even in a few years time DVD quality will still be 'good enough' for a lot of people, BD for most of the rest of us, 4K for home cinemas.

8K will struggle big time.
2 Likes #11
4k and 8k is a gimmick.

Nothing supports these resolutions. No movies, no tv channels, no games consoles. Maybe the odd netflix movie does, but you gonna buy a very expensive tv for 1 netflix movie?

Buying a 4k tv your likely wasting your money. 8k has no hope.

Stick to 1080p for the next 5 to 10 years. When tv channels all transfer to 4k or 8k then i will.

Edited By: J4GG4 on Jan 06, 2015 12:22
banned#12
J4GG4
4k and 8k is a gimmick.

Nothing supports these resolutions. No movies, no tv channels, no games consoles. Maybe the odd netflix movie does, but you gonna buy a very expensive tv for 1 netflix movie?

Buying a 4k tv your likely wasting your money. 8k has no hope.

Stick to 1080p for the next 5 to 10 years. When tv channels all transfer to 4k or 8k then i will.

- 4K is supported by consoles, albeit not during gaming
- You can game in 4K using a PC
- There are a number of 4K movies/TV shows on Netflix and also Amazon Instant
- YT has a growing number of 4K videos
- 4K disc format is on track for a 2015 launch
- You can watch passive 3D in 1080p using a 4K TV, which isn't possible with a 1080p TV
#13
Have you guys seen the file sizes for 4K video? they are massive! a 2 min 4K trailer is about 600mb oO
banned#14
DEALofaLifetime
Have you guys seen the file sizes for 4K video's? they are massive! 2 min 4K trailer is about 600mb oO

Most likely an inefficient codec. Using h.265 codec 4K/24fps videos should be around 2x1080p file sizes (ie around 15GB) and 4K/60fps around 5x (ie around 37.5GB). That's what you can expect for downloads.

Disc based media will be a higher bitrate making the files larger, so 100 - 120GB should be the target for 4K discs (Providing they use h.265)
#15
KillFelix
DEALofaLifetime
Have you guys seen the file sizes for 4K video's? they are massive! 2 min 4K trailer is about 600mb oO

Most likely an inefficient codec. Using h.265 codec 4K/24fps videos should be around 2x1080p file sizes (ie around 15GB) and 4K/60fps around 5x (ie around 37.5GB). That's what you can expect for downloads.

Disc based media will be a higher bitrate making the files larger, so 100 - 120GB should be the target for 4K discs (Providing they use h.265)

A lot of the 4k video files around are h.264 based as well. HEVC is more efficient.
#16
OLED is the next big advancement in TV tech.
banned#17
rev6
KillFelix
DEALofaLifetime
Have you guys seen the file sizes for 4K video's? they are massive! 2 min 4K trailer is about 600mb oO

Most likely an inefficient codec. Using h.265 codec 4K/24fps videos should be around 2x1080p file sizes (ie around 15GB) and 4K/60fps around 5x (ie around 37.5GB). That's what you can expect for downloads.

Disc based media will be a higher bitrate making the files larger, so 100 - 120GB should be the target for 4K discs (Providing they use h.265)

A lot of the 4k video files around are h.264 based as well. HEVC is more efficient.

True. I remember most 1080p vids were DIVX before MKV etc became the mainstream.
#18
Picture quality will be very sharp.....
#19
16k prepare your bumholes!
#20
Lucifer_UK
16k prepare your bumholes!

I am preparing for the fappening in 16k! come on technology and celebrities catch up!
#21
Lucifer_UK
16k prepare your bumholes!


I'm skipping 16k until the 32k Star Wars boxset is sub £20

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