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A Little Migraine Help Please...

bitseylango Avatar
8y, 1w agoPosted 8 years, 1 week ago
...not looking for medical advice just some friendly help on the subject of migraine.
My 12 year old son has been getting migraines for approx 1 year now, few and far between but incredibly severe when he does. Went to the doctors when he first had them and was told that he has to learn when one is starting and try and nip it in the bud with paracetomol and ibruprofen. trouble is he gets so bad that he ends up throwing up ( just done it all over the kitchen units ) and crying with severe pain.
We have noticed that chocolate has triggered it and was wondering if any other sufferers have a particular food that triggers theirs.
What do you take? and as a non-sufferer how do I explain to a 12 year old how to spot the early signs?
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bitseylango Avatar
8y, 1w agoPosted 8 years, 1 week ago
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1 Like #1
Chocolate is very common for causing migraine ..... and red cheese does it for me
1 Like #2
I used to get them when i was younger, cheese was what made them happen

an early sign for me was i couldnt read words as some of the lettering disappeared and also i had flashing in my eyes
1 Like #3
I usually find cheese and chocolate trigger them.

Early signs for me are usually blurred vision, i can only see straight in front, but always find if I can take a ibruprofen at this stage the full on migraine never occurs.
#4
Poor little ******, hope you work something out x
#5
Has he had his eyes tested recently? May need specs as may be also straining his eyes.. Hope he feels better soon x
1 Like #6
my sisters boy suffers - as you say just 1 - 2 a year but so severe he down for 2 days

sis went through causes etc and nothing came up - but when he does feel 1 coming on he takes tablets and lies down - feel for you bitsy and hope something gets done
#7
MIne always starts with kinda flashing lights in my eyes. The quickest thing to work in co-codamol soluble, but Im not sure what age would be ok
#8
I tend to get them too, but I have no trigger. Just before it happens I get a nose bleed.
Most cases you tend to grow out of them so it may only be temporary for your son.
1 Like #9
I suffer from migranes since several years and started to keep a diary to find out what may be triggering them. In my case I found that lifestyle rather than diet triggered them; things like stress/ tiredness/ lack of food - water (if I dont eat properly or drink enough) - or if I have a very busy- exciting day. I usually get an "aura" so I am aware when is coming and trying to prevent it from escalating works much better than curing it once it becomes full on. I take a migrane tablet plus a tablet for nausea which you put between your gum and lip and make it dissolve, it works really well.

I hope your son gets better soon and grows out of it but for the moment he needs to learn how to cope!
#10
he hasnt had any cheese today but has helped himself to a shedload of chocolate without me knowing :x
I have tried asking him what happens when it starts and he says he just gets a headache :roll:
Tonights episode started with the headache and tears about an hour ago so gave him paracetomol, he cried out when i put his light on to check on him and now he has just chucked up everywhere.......maybe another trip to the doctor for some prescribed tablets is the next step.


thanks for all your replies, I hope too that he will grow out of it x
1 Like #11
i get them some times
my signs are loss of perripheral vision and flashing lights in front of me
if I take tablets quickly it will go off but if not have to go to bed in dark room for a few hours
#12
dmtuk
Has he had his eyes tested recently? May need specs as may be also straining his eyes.. Hope he feels better soon x


yes, when they first started I took him on advice from the doctor and the optician said his eyes were fine.
#13
chocolate and cheese mainly, ie things that I love
1 Like #14
awwww bless him :friends:
my nan suffered terrible with migraines and couldn't eat chocolate or cheese could these would trigger them off.
there is also a sight you can go on where you send off a hair sample and it sends a report back on what allergies etc you have..... might be worth a try but don't know if it would help.
hope you get this sorted.... poor little mite
1 Like #15
I used to suffer the same when I was his age - poor guy.

Choccy & cheese definite triggers - in fact quite a few dairy things.

strange thing was, certain smells used to trigger them off as well.

I don't know if anyone remembers the old photocopying macines in schools in the 70's/80's that used smelly purple ink - well the smell of that used to trigger off migraines with me.

Also, funny & minging as it sounds but other people's BO!!

Another hint, one that always used to get me was the smell of grass. Does your son play on a playing field at all? This sounds really strange but the smell of trodden grass used to set them off.

Just like your boy, mine used to result in violent sickness. They started progressively, with tiredness, nausea, & sore eyes & coloured lights.

One good thing - I grew out of them at 14/15 years old so hopefully he won't suffer much longer.

hope he's ok.

Col.
#16
All I can suggest is that he lies in a dark, quiet room with maybe a cool towel - slightly damp - held just above his eyes. This is all I can do when I get one, as like your Son, I am always sick so medication is a no go.

Hope he is feeling better soon. x
1 Like #17
bitseylango
he cried out when i put his light on to check on him and now he has just chucked up everywhere


Never, and I mean NEVER put a light on. Thats probably what triggered him throwing up. Light increases the pain receptors in the eye. Basically it feels like your being stabbed.

Unfortunantly it's gonna be paracetamol and ibroprofen and as soon as possible all in a darkened room. Best thing for his age is to give him lots of cuddles while in bed. Sorry its not any good news : (
#18
Murran
All I can suggest is that he lies in a dark, quiet room with maybe a cool towel - slightly damp - held just above his eyes. This is all I can do when I get one, as like your Son, I am always sick so medication is a no go.

Hope he is feeling better soon. x


thanks, he is in bed now with a flannel on his head.....still not happy but im hoping the worse is over x
#19
cdemico
Never, and I mean NEVER put a light on. Thats probably what triggered him throwing up. Light increases the pain receptors in the eye. Basically it feels like your being stabbed.

Unfortunantly it's gonna be paracetamol and ibroprofen and as soon as possible all in a darkened room. Best thing for his age is to give him lots of cuddles while in bed. Sorry its not any good news : (


oops, my fault :oops: bless him......gonna go and give him a cuddle now x
#20
bitseylango
he hasnt had any cheese today but has helped himself to a shedload of chocolate without me knowing :x
I have tried asking him what happens when it starts and he says he just gets a headache :roll:
Tonights episode started with the headache and tears about an hour ago so gave him paracetomol, he cried out when i put his light on to check on him and now he has just chucked up everywhere.......maybe another trip to the doctor for some prescribed tablets is the next step.


thanks for all your replies, I hope too that he will grow out of it x


When I was younger, around your sons age I think, Paracetomol didn't work, the only thing that worked was perscribed 400mg Ibuprofen. Hopefully your doctor will offer this. Light is also terrible when you get migraines, need to stay in a dark room until the worst is over!
#21
My mum suffers very badly from migraines and has done for 50 years or so and ends up being sick with them too. She now uses those water rehydration sachets. She also uses that headrin stuff (think it's called that?) that stick you swipe over your head and also she has found that Anadin extra works better than most pain killers. Stress, tiredness and lack of food / water triggers them off. Hope this helps? When I get them from time to time I wear my sunglasses all the time as my eyes are very sensitive
#22
:-(Oh bless. Sorry to hear your little man is suffering at such a young age. Unfortunately, they run in our family so we've all suffered from young ages.

We've all found that pretty much anything can trigger them off sometimes, ranging from the 'normal' triggers such as chocolate, cheese and chinese food to more unusual things like the sun suddenly popping out from behind a cloud and catching me briefly in the eyes, the lighting in the room being too dim whilst watching tv and even not shutting the curtains properly and waking up with the sun shining in my face can trigger an attack.

My usual warning signs are floating 'blobs' in my vision and tunnel vision (where I can see straight ahead or what's directly in front of me but I can't see anything either side, even if I was to hold my hand up just off centre of my line of sight)

If I take a couple of Solpadol tablets (codine and somethinhg else in them) as soon as I get the funny vision, then there's a good chance it doesn't go any further, but I still have to make sure on top of the tablets that I'm out of bright light and even have to wear sunglasses when the sun's not actually shining but it's just a really bright day. The doctor did prescribe these tablets that instantly dissolve on your tongue and they did stop every single episode for my mum as long as she took it early enough, but it was hit and miss with me. Still might be worth mentioning them to your doctor as they might work for your son. Can't remember the name of them though I'm afraid. Hope you both manage to sort it out though cause they're really awful
#23
I get it all behind my eyes, no dodgy vision, just what feels like huge pressure behind my eyes with the start of the headache. I usually take paramax and try to sleep it off if i can.
#24
Definitely a dark quiet room is the best. I find those cooling strips that stick to your forehead, you can get 2 for 99p in boots are quite soothing as they're slightly mentholated too. One on the forehead and/or base of the neck help me relax slightly.
I also take syndol when nothing else works but they really do knock you out. They're pretty stong.
My cousin started very much like your son when he was about 12 with the same incredibly bad migraines where he'd end up crying and throwing up (he's 21 now and still gets them :S ) but the doctor ended up prescibing him beta blockers for his which might help your son out. :thumbsup:
#25
Quite often there is not just one trigger. There can be 3-5 that push you over the threshold to suffer the migrane - you can be doing well with 3 going on and then the 4th starts the headache. For example you might normally eat chocolate with no problems but if you eat chocolate after some exhausting nights, skipped lunch and its been a windy day then there is a good chance you'll then start a migrane. Some research suggests that chocolate may not be a trigger but a symptom for some as the need and craving for sugar is a precursor to a migrane and means it's all ready on the way. The need for the sugar could be because of fluctuating blood sugar during the day.

Although there is often a major food trigger, including the ones already mentioned, plus for some adults particular alcoholic beverages, if you can keep a regular sleeping pattern, regular food (no skipping breakfast) and avoid stressful situations (though at school that's impossible to avoid exams) or extreme stimulating environments( loud noises, extreme weather/sun/cold) then it is often possible to keep below the 'threshold' without giving up your favourite food trigger completely, unfortunately not always.

Beta blockers are fine for people who suffer from them extremely and frequently, or if you want to avoid getting a migraine for an important situation but unfortunately they do dull your cognition which is a bind if you want to do well in exams, but if the alternative is that you are definitely going to be curled up in a dark room for 2-3 days suffering you don't really have any choice.

At this time your GP would most probably will want to try strategies for preventative solutions, especially as its reasonably infrequent still - keep a food diary, an event diary, try to tie down a pattern. Hit the painkillers as soon as possible. We put a wet towel or flannel in the freezer so it stays cold for longer and isn't drippy to cool the forehead.

There's a good chance he can grow out of juvenile migranes. Girls that get them around teenage find they are also hormonally related and continue for most of their mid adult years which is why a lot more females suffer than males. I wish your laddie all the best.
#26
I used to take I think they're called Paramax sachets, they have an anti-sickness in them which you can get seperately- metroclopramide syrup (I carry a bottle everywhere as I have a severe phobia of vomitting, and have 2 in the bathroom lol)

I find that the light makes mine worse, I've been suffering with headaches/migraines every single day for the past year now, actually seeing a headache specialist at the moment and they're going to try me on some tablets.
Apparently some migraines can be triggered by weight problems so I've been told to lose weight (I am classed as morbidly obese so probably isn't the case in your sons situation)

My dad suffers them too, he doesn't eat cheese but things like chocolate will set him off, I think apples did too, i know a lot of people have complained about scents, if there's strong perfume on someone I end up feeling woozy, and I love wearing perfume myself but have to just spray it on my clothes once as the smell ends up too strong and will make me ill. I can't at all put it on my wrists or behind my ear- that will definitely make me ill.

Also, things that I notice before a migraine, sensitive to light, blurred vision, the first migraine I remember was when i was 15 and i was in mcdonalds and it was like I was in a bubble. I could see fine straight ahead, but everything at the sides of my vision was like all curved, it was so weird. (Also triggered off panic attacks for myself, so hadn't been on a bus in ages, but recently did :D:D:D:D really proud of myself lol)

Also, has your son tried relaxation music? I listen to an american guy, think his name is farago or summat. It might help him relax any tensed muscles and ease it off easier? Hope any of this has helped,
Love,
Sam xxx
#27
the wife gets hers after a sleepless night or a stressfull day in work she usually gets what she calls funny eyes, she takes strong pain killers asap then uses an eye mask to make it dark. i have only had a couple and i have to sleep mine off and i am usually sick, hope he grows out of them :thumbsup:
#28
Good info here. I am sure you know most of this but helps to be aware.

http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/migraine/Pages/Introduction.aspx?url=Pages/What-is-it.aspx

You are right, need to go back to GP again and spell out the patterns, symptoms and specifically the vomiting. There is specific migraine medication which might be more useful and GP should make available on repeat scripts.

Although for most headaches, paracetamol is ideal, in some cases it can make some migraines worse. GP should help you find out which medication helps him most at this time, it may take some time to find what works but be persistant. You should not have to buy these things yourself, can work out expensive.
#29
Caffeine and stress are my triggers. I get an aura (the weird lights in your vision) prior to a migraine, about 1/2 an hour before the headache starts.

The important thing is to make sure that he takes some medication (I go for paracetemol or Anadin) as soon as he notices the signs (which he will get used to). Once the migraine has properly started, your gut stops working, and hence any medication you take will just sit in your stomach and not do anything.

I'll always take some medication if I feel as though I'm about to get a migraine, even if I'm not sure. If I do, then it's just a case of damage limitation. Unfortunately there's very little you can do at that stage other than sit it out.
#30
thankyou all so much for your replies.......he is up and about this morning as if nothing happened!

I am going to show him the replies here and all your different explanations of auras etc and see if any of them happen in the early stages before the headache, maybe just reading this may jog his memory and help him recognise the signs before it takes hold.

Going to make an appointment at the GP's too. Thankyou all once again x
#31
hi my son been sufering with migrains since he was 5 his now seventeen we have had all the checks heart, kidneys and brain scans but thank god they were all clear he also suffered sickness and the following day a mild headache we found one of his triggers was hunger, doctor at hospital has perscibed pizotifen that he has to take both morning and night every day for the last year to stop these migraines and touch wood his migraines are less severe and not so many (i have held of him taking these tablets hoping he would grow out of migraines but i wish i had allowed them to be perscibed earlier) we used a dark room and cold compress on forehead (only cos he couldnt take tablet if migraine as bad cos of sickness) after an hour wake him up to take tablets leave again for an hour then hopefully he would start to feel human again but for me it was scary and frustrating that i could not help him
#32
My headaches used to come on when my mum was moaning about the same old, same old...jus sayin'
#33
I've had migrains since i was about 10. When I was a kid chocolate and cheese deffinatly set them off. When I was older it was red wine. Now it appearse random. We did notice that they were more frequent round 'that time of the month' when I was younger but I doubt thats gonna be an issue for yer son.

Poor soul. He may not be noticing the lights flashing ect I doubt its something kids give alot of thought to when mine goes my vision splits in half. its very bizzar.
#34
I started getting them at around age 13 and still suffer now. It doesn't take long to learn when one is coming on and the difference between a headache and migraine. A lot of people find their migraines are caused by chocolate, or simply by caffeine. It's always a good idea to keep a note of all food you have and when you get a migraine - soon enough you'll see a pattern forming if certain foods are triggers.

Funnily enough, when I have a migraine coming on, i start to crave caffeine - chocolate and coke!

It's very hard to describe how it feels when you have a migraine coming on, I guess it's probably different for everyone but after you've had a few attacks, you just know.
#35
again.......thanks to all for taking the time to reply.

well......took him to the GP and to be honest I wasnt too inmpressed. He didnt want to prescribe him anything because he isnt officially 12 until Thursday :roll: even though he is the size of an average 14 year old :)
The doc asked me to keep a diary of his food and drink intake over the next 4 weeks and make another appointment after xmas, until then if another attack occurs give him paracetomol as soon as it starts followed by ibruprofen 1 hour later........just as I have been doing.

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