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Aberfan - The mistake that cost a village its children

£0.00 @ ITS
In remembrance 50 years ago and the kids that survived have not had an easy life. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-150d11df-c541-44a9-9332-560a19828c47 Read More
cchopps Avatar
banned7m, 5d agoPosted 7 months, 5 days ago
In remembrance

50 years ago and the kids that survived have not had an easy life.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-150d11df-c541-44a9-9332-560a19828c47
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banned7m, 5d agoPosted 7 months, 5 days ago
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banned 3 Likes #1
It wasnt a mistake.
5 Likes #2
Extremely sad :(.

YouDontWantToKnow
It wasnt a mistake.

Please stop.
banned 4 Likes #3
YouDontWantToKnow
It wasnt a mistake.

http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/news/special/2016/newsspec_15130/media/letter-mr.jpg
#4
Mistake or not any loss of life is just so sad, thoughts and prayers to all affected by the tragedy back then.
2 Likes #5
awful story, truly heroic villagers saving their fellow community, despicable NCB.
#6
YouDontWantToKnow
It wasnt a mistake.

It may not have been a total 'mistake', but it was a tragic accident.
9 Likes #7
OP I know you didn't mean it but to me that title makes it sound like the village made some sort of mistake, it was negligence on the part of the National Coal Board, blatantly ignoring information that said this would happen..

I think its just as important to remember the Government has a massive part to play in this and still have not been held accountable. A terrible awful tragedy how those parents managed to carry on is beyond me.

Edited By: haritori on Oct 21, 2016 19:43
#8
:(
Plant trees save lives
2 Likes #9
Beyond horrific.

They were only in school for 15 minutes and I believe it was the last day before they were off on holiday for half term.

If only it had happened just a short time before or the next day.

Absolutely dreadful, I read somewhere that one little girl had wanted to stay at home and her mother had told her no and to go in as it was the last day. I don't know how you get over something like that but it appears the women in particular made a group so they could do things with their remaining children and try and grt on with their lives with the support of each other.
5 Likes #10
Happened in a village not far from where I live. Absolutely tragic. My grandfather and uncle went over to help dig those children out...I have cried many tears this week remembering those tragic events. The coal board were to blame. So so sad...really hits home when it's so close to home
banned#11
haritori
OP I know you didn't mean it but to me that title makes it sound like the village made some sort of mistake, it was negligence on the part of the National Coal Board, blatantly ignoring information that said this would happen..
I think its just as important to remember the Government has a massive part to play in this and still have not been held accountable. A terrible awful tragedy how those parents managed to carry on is beyond me.

The reason "mistake" is in the OPs title is because that is the title of the BBCs story.
2 Likes #12
YouDontWantToKnow
haritori
OP I know you didn't mean it but to me that title makes it sound like the village made some sort of mistake, it was negligence on the part of the National Coal Board, blatantly ignoring information that said this would happen..
I think its just as important to remember the Government has a massive part to play in this and still have not been held accountable. A terrible awful tragedy how those parents managed to carry on is beyond me.
The reason "mistake" is in the OPs title is because that is the title of the BBCs story.

Ahh right, sorry I didnt go to the link.
banned 3 Likes #13
nublets2k

Please stop.

No I wont.

It was no mistake.

It was an act of corporate manslaughter & if it happened today at least 3 people would be jailed.
#14
Sorry if i appear to be cynical. How much compensation are we talking about?
#15
CookinBat
Sorry if i appear to be cynical. How much compensation are we talking about?


£500 per person/child.
banned 2 Likes #16
Mark2111
CookinBat
Sorry if i appear to be cynical. How much compensation are we talking about?
£500 per person/child.

That was revised years later & they ended up getting about £4500 I think.
4 Likes #17
the little cemetery there is the saddest place I've ever visited :(
https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/371/20124965071_134e5abfea_b.jpg
what happened that day is beyond comprehension
banned 1 Like #19
2 Likes #20
Mark2111
CookinBat
Sorry if i appear to be cynical. How much compensation are we talking about?
£500 per person/child.
Much more than that, In 1966, the Aberfan Disaster Memorial Fund (ADMF) received 90,000 contributions which reached a total of £1,606,929. The remaining tips were only eventually made safe after a lengthy fight from Aberfan residents, resisted by the NCB and Labour Government. Clearing was paid for by a government grant and forced contribution of £150,000 taken from the charity fund. In 1997 the Labour Government paid back the £150,000 to the ADMF and in 2007 the Welsh Assembly donated £1.5 million to ADMF as recompense for the money wrongly taken.
...
.
£500 per child was that derisory token gesture compensation.
.
1967 - £5,000 grant per family from their £1,800,000 disaster fund, but bulk of money, if not all, I am not sure, came from public donations? In those days, there was much more national unity. (From memory in 1967 this sum was equivalent to about 2 to 3 semi detached houses in the London suburbs.) http://www.john-summers.net/aberfan2.html
.
However, as can be seen from media, there's still unfinished business.





Edited By: splender on Oct 21, 2016 21:49: added text
#22
Without researching all the old news, it appears the grant money came from public donations which was that £5,000. But the disaster compensation was £500 per child in 1966/7 which was just a derisory token gesture. At that time average weekly wage was about £16.
#23
splender
Without researching all the old news, it appears the grant money came from public donations which was that £5,000. But the disaster compensation was £500 per child in 1966/7 which was just a derisory token gesture. At that time average weekly wage was about £16.


That was my understanding of the original £500. A lot of money in those days but I shouldn't think any amount of money made the families feel better.
1 Like #24
You can't place a value on a child's life so whilst the government behaved appallingly I wonder how one can assign a value to compensation in cases like this?
If you give parents too much many might well feel guilty and that doesn't help.
I skimmed the large article on the BBC website and the worst thing I read was the the parents were asked how close they were to their children and if they weren't that close they had no compensation at all.
Those were different times.
1 Like #25
Mark2111
splender
Without researching all the old news, it appears the grant money came from public donations which was that £5,000. But the disaster compensation was £500 per child in 1966/7 which was just a derisory token gesture. At that time average weekly wage was about £16.
That was my understanding of the original £500. A lot of money in those days but I shouldn't think any amount of money made the families feel better.
In those days people "were regarded as cheap like livestock" by the elite. Another example is The Child Migrant programme, whichh finished around 1970. he philanthropists who sent Britain's "orphans" thousands of miles overseas to farms in Australia and Canada believed they were performing a charitable deed.

Between the 1920s and the 1960s as many as 150,000 young children were despatched to institutions and foster homes abroad so that they might begin happier lives in the under-populated Commonwealth.

Charities including Barnardo's, the Catholic church and local authorities helped organise the emigration of youngsters aged between three and 14. So the children could make a clean start, they were usually told their parents had died.

In reality, many were children of single mothers who had been forced to give them up for adoption in an era when their solitary status constituted a grave social stigma.

The fresh beginning the children were promised degenerated into years of servitude and hard labour on remote farms and at state orphanages. They were often subjected to physical and sexual abuse, separated from their siblings and taunted for being "the sons of ****".
banned 1 Like #26
splender
Mark2111
splender
Without researching all the old news, it appears the grant money came from public donations which was that £5,000. But the disaster compensation was £500 per child in 1966/7 which was just a derisory token gesture. At that time average weekly wage was about £16.
That was my understanding of the original £500. A lot of money in those days but I shouldn't think any amount of money made the families feel better.
In those days people "were regarded as cheap like livestock" by the elite. Another example is The Child Migrant programme, whichh finished around 1970. he philanthropists who sent Britain's "orphans" thousands of miles overseas to farms in Australia and Canada believed they were performing a charitable deed.
Between the 1920s and the 1960s as many as 150,000 young children were despatched to institutions and foster homes abroad so that they might begin happier lives in the under-populated Commonwealth.
Charities including Barnardo's, the Catholic church and local authorities helped organise the emigration of youngsters aged between three and 14. So the children could make a clean start, they were usually told their parents had died.
In reality, many were children of single mothers who had been forced to give them up for adoption in an era when their solitary status constituted a grave social stigma.
The fresh beginning the children were promised degenerated into years of servitude and hard labour on remote farms and at state orphanages. They were often subjected to physical and sexual abuse, separated from their siblings and taunted for being "the sons of ****".

They say you learn something new every day. Today i did just that. Thank you.
#27
Agharta
You can't place a value on a child's life so whilst the government behaved appallingly I wonder how one can assign a value to compensation in cases like this?
If you give parents too much many might well feel guilty and that doesn't help.
I skimmed the large article on the BBC website and the worst thing I read was the the parents were asked how close they were to their children and if they weren't that close they had no compensation at all.
Those were different times.
indeed, in that era in the 60s, the ordinary people were really warm and neigbourly but the men in power were mainly aloof.
#28
cchopps
splender
Mark2111
splender
Without researching all the old news, it appears the grant money came from public donations which was that £5,000. But the disaster compensation was £500 per child in 1966/7 which was just a derisory token gesture. At that time average weekly wage was about £16.
That was my understanding of the original £500. A lot of money in those days but I shouldn't think any amount of money made the families feel better.
In those days people "were regarded as cheap like livestock" by the elite. Another example is The Child Migrant programme, whichh finished around 1970. he philanthropists who sent Britain's "orphans" thousands of miles overseas to farms in Australia and Canada believed they were performing a charitable deed.
Between the 1920s and the 1960s as many as 150,000 young children were despatched to institutions and foster homes abroad so that they might begin happier lives in the under-populated Commonwealth.
Charities including Barnardo's, the Catholic church and local authorities helped organise the emigration of youngsters aged between three and 14. So the children could make a clean start, they were usually told their parents had died.
In reality, many were children of single mothers who had been forced to give them up for adoption in an era when their solitary status constituted a grave social stigma.
The fresh beginning the children were promised degenerated into years of servitude and hard labour on remote farms and at state orphanages. They were often subjected to physical and sexual abuse, separated from their siblings and taunted for being "the sons of ****".
They say you learn something new every day. Today i did just that. Thank you.
It is really painful chapter in very recent history, for those young mums who had children taken away and went to grave without seeing their children again.
.
Just this one single story of one child sends chivers, "In the 1990s one man told a British parliamentary committee of the criminal abuse he was subjected at the hands of Catholic priests at Tardun in Western Australia who competed between themselves to see who could rape him 100 times first, he said."
Because the men liked his blue eyes, he would beat himself in an attempt to make them change colour.
Other children have told of having to eat flies to survive and of being forced to beat other children. When they told adults about the abuse, they were not believed.
.
There were about 500,000 such children (not just from UK) shipped to Australia. Savile was a small fry when compared with such industrial scale of abuse in that era.

Edited By: splender on Oct 21, 2016 23:34
#29
haritori
OP I know you didn't mean it but to me that title makes it sound like the village made some sort of mistake, it was negligence on the part of the National Coal Board, blatantly ignoring information that said this would happen..

I think its just as important to remember the Government has a massive part to play in this and still have not been held accountable. A terrible awful tragedy how those parents managed to carry on is beyond me.


good to hear the facts from someone.
1 Like #30
The only good thing that came as a direct result of that disaster is the 1974 health and safety at work act, which included the general pubkic. Before that there was no legislation for it.
#31
gr8t1
The only good thing that came as a direct result of that disaster is the 1974 health and safety at work act, which included the general pubkic. Before that there was no legislation for it.

Just read this, scary..

It was the NCB’s chairman Lord Robens - criticised for not going to the disaster scene immediately and attending a ceremony.

two years later Lord Robens was chosen to chair a review of health and safety which resulted in the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 which continues to regulate practice to this day.
1 Like #32
gr8t1
The only good thing that came as a direct result of that disaster is the 1974 health and safety at work act, which included the general pubkic. Before that there was no legislation for it.
Has been an evolutionary timeline since 1802 with enormous and numerous disasters along the way, many of which became case laws in tort and always in legislation https://sm.britsafe.org/health-and-safety-timeline
1 Like #33
mxer450
gr8t1
The only good thing that came as a direct result of that disaster is the 1974 health and safety at work act, which included the general pubkic. Before that there was no legislation for it.
Just read this, scary..
It was the NCB’s chairman Lord Robens - criticised for not going to the disaster scene immediately and attending a ceremony.
two years later Lord Robens was chosen to chair a review of health and safety which resulted in the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 which continues to regulate practice to this day.
Here is more about this on Lord Robens http://www.shponline.co.uk/flawed-hero-aberfan-hswa/?cid=searchresult
.
But of course NCB did not accept any liability but here is an insightful view that suggests otherwise http://www.hastam.co.uk/aberfan-disaster-21-october-1966-lessons-today-perhaps-yet-heeded/
3 Likes #34
I had no idea this happened until recently and since finding out about it I've read up as much as possible.

Such a tragedy and it's really struck me.

The NCB's actions before and after were disgusting. The fact that no one got sacked, that they initially offered £50 compensation per child, and refused to pay any money to cover "costs" of the clear up (in fact that took 150k from the fund) enrages me.

The village life was pretty much destroyed after this. Suicides, depressions, PTS, etc. It truly was a dark day in British/Welsh history.
1 Like #35
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07yt4qy

"50 years after the Aberfan disaster which killed 144 people, singer and entertainer Max Boyce returns to the Welsh village to meet the choir that formed in its wake."

This is really good also, some members of the choir are survivors of the disaster. Well worth a listen.

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