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Is it about time people toned down the rhetoric?

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DEAD AFTER VOTING BREXIT: Man died after fight with 'bully' Remainer over EU referendum A STAUNCH Brexit supporter was found dead in his home just hours after being battered and threatened he would…
Fred Smith Avatar
4m, 1w agoPosted 4 months, 1 week ago
DEAD AFTER VOTING BREXIT: Man died after fight with 'bully' Remainer over EU referendum

A STAUNCH Brexit supporter was found dead in his home just hours after being battered and threatened he would be burned alive by his neighbour in a heated row over the EU referendum...

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/721364/Brexit-supporter-died-fight-with-Remain-supporter-over-European-Union-referendum
Fred Smith Avatar
4m, 1w agoPosted 4 months, 1 week ago
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7 Likes #1
Attitudes like this are fuelled by the media bias and disinformation. Unfortunately people are reinforcing their own biased views by watching and listening to news networks that cater to their own worldview. One of my neighbours almost blows a fuse whenever anyone says anything against pro-EU news or anything against Clinton. He gets all his information from BBC radio. Too many people can no longer have a rational debate on political issues without it become angry. Again, I blame the way the media delivers the news, for its rare to see an unbiased approach, instead it seems eager to fuel polarised sentiments.


Edited By: Predikuesi on Oct 16, 2016 07:50: Edit
2 Likes #2
People need to calm down, European Union wouldn't have been perfect and neither will Brexit.
4 Likes #3
the bloke in the article also attacked someone else with a hammer. he got 4 years, so will be out in 2. a better question would be why such a short sentence for someone with issues.
4 Likes #4
Nothing to do with Brexit per se, a typical brawl over nothing but hot air.
4 Likes #5
This is a forewarning to all those wishing to see the Referendum result ignored.

I actually know a number of people who would take things into their own hands if the result is ignored.

Please don't blame the media, they haven't even begun to touch upon what would happen if Freedom of Movement was retained.

This runs far deeper than anyone has dared touch upon so far. There's passion, and then there's anger.

Beneath the surface, meaning street Polling etc, when you actually talk to people in private, you hear real aggression in response to the possibility of retaining Freedom of Movement.

I really do hope our politicians understand this, because so far, I haven't heard one Remainer recognise this.
2 Likes #6
shadey12
the bloke in the article also attacked someone else with a hammer. he got 4 years, so will be out in 2. a better question would be why such a short sentence for someone with issues.
You get a longer sentence for not paying your TV license :-/
3 Likes #7
What do we want? HARD BREXIT!

When do we want it? NOW!
1 Like #8
That was just one topic the man had a row about and someone so violent probably has many topics such as football, the weather, Marmite etc, that if you don't agree with him he goes berserk.

This time he managed to kill someone during one of his outbursts,

Lock him up and never let him back oit and let him spend his time in jail with bigger and stronger inmates who he might think twice before having a temper tantrum.
banned#9
coathanger
This is a forewarning to all those wishing to see the Referendum result ignored.
I actually know a number of people who would take things into their own hands if the result is ignored.
Please don't blame the media, they haven't even begun to touch upon what would happen if Freedom of Movement was retained.
This runs far deeper than anyone has dared touch upon so far. There's passion, and then there's anger.
Beneath the surface, meaning street Polling etc, when you actually talk to people in private, you hear real aggression in response to the possibility of retaining Freedom of Movement.
I really do hope our politicians understand this, because so far, I haven't heard one Remainer recognise this.

WhIlst we're negotiating with the EU to leave I would imagine there is going to be discussion about those EU citizens that have set up home in the U.K. What do think will happen there bearing in mind some EU member states do not allow dual citizenship? Freedom of movement for a Lithuanian living in the U.K. who has children born here is a different to a Lithuanian wanting to come to the UK after Brexit. That country does not allow dual nationality. Would you expect the resident of the UK to be able to travel to Lithuania and back in the same fashion as a U.K. Passport holder could after we have left the EU?

Do you think we should offer British citizenship to those people that are already residing in the U.K, or in the case above, where a Lithuanian wouldn't want to give up their Lithuanian citizenship should we invoke a system that would make it easy for U.K. Border control to understand the situation clearly. Some sort of paperwork in their Lithuanian passport for example.



Edited By: cchopps on Oct 16, 2016 09:03
2 Likes #10
Mark2111
That was just one topic the man had a row about and someone so violent probably has many topics such as football, the weather, Marmite etc, that if you don't agree with him he goes berserk.
This time he managed to kill someone during one of his outbursts,
Lock him up and never let him back oit and let him spend his time in jail with bigger and stronger inmates who he might think twice before having a temper tantrum.
Could need medication if so unbalanced.
#11
coathanger
This is a forewarning to all those wishing to see the Referendum result ignored.
I actually know a number of people who would take things into their own hands if the result is ignored.
Please don't blame the media, they haven't even begun to touch upon what would happen if Freedom of Movement was retained.
This runs far deeper than anyone has dared touch upon so far. There's passion, and then there's anger.
Beneath the surface, meaning street Polling etc, when you actually talk to people in private, you hear real aggression in response to the possibility of retaining Freedom of Movement.
I really do hope our politicians understand this, because so far, I haven't heard one Remainer recognise this.
Doe what you suggest may also affect millions of Brits living abroad in EU and they should be coming back home?
#12
cchopps
coathanger
This is a forewarning to all those wishing to see the Referendum result ignored.
I actually know a number of people who would take things into their own hands if the result is ignored.
Please don't blame the media, they haven't even begun to touch upon what would happen if Freedom of Movement was retained.
This runs far deeper than anyone has dared touch upon so far. There's passion, and then there's anger.
Beneath the surface, meaning street Polling etc, when you actually talk to people in private, you hear real aggression in response to the possibility of retaining Freedom of Movement.
I really do hope our politicians understand this, because so far, I haven't heard one Remainer recognise this.
WhIlst we're negotiating with the EU to leave I would imagine there is going to be discussion about those EU citizens that have set up home in the U.K. What do think will happen there bearing in mind some EU member states do not allow dual citizenship? Freedom of movement for a Lithuanian living in the U.K. who has children born here is a different to a Lithuanian wanting to come to the UK after Brexit. That country does not allow dual nationality. Would you expect the resident of the UK to be able to travel to Lithuania and back in the same fashion as a U.K. Passport holder could after we have left the EU?
I would expect the partner of either to relocate to the country of the working parent.

Is it the UKs fault that Lithuania (et al) are not so welcoming? Why do you feel it necessary the UK should be the open door, why is your question not aimed at Lithuania?

Personally, I have no problem with a UK national married and living in the U.K. with a working EU national. I would expect that it doesn't then mean every living relative also has access.

The challenging issue is, if they move to Lithuania, have children in that country, do you expect those children to then also have open access to the UK?
banned#13
coathanger
cchopps
coathanger
This is a forewarning to all those wishing to see the Referendum result ignored.
I actually know a number of people who would take things into their own hands if the result is ignored.
Please don't blame the media, they haven't even begun to touch upon what would happen if Freedom of Movement was retained.
This runs far deeper than anyone has dared touch upon so far. There's passion, and then there's anger.
Beneath the surface, meaning street Polling etc, when you actually talk to people in private, you hear real aggression in response to the possibility of retaining Freedom of Movement.
I really do hope our politicians understand this, because so far, I haven't heard one Remainer recognise this.
WhIlst we're negotiating with the EU to leave I would imagine there is going to be discussion about those EU citizens that have set up home in the U.K. What do think will happen there bearing in mind some EU member states do not allow dual citizenship? Freedom of movement for a Lithuanian living in the U.K. who has children born here is a different to a Lithuanian wanting to come to the UK after Brexit. That country does not allow dual nationality. Would you expect the resident of the UK to be able to travel to Lithuania and back in the same fashion as a U.K. Passport holder could after we have left the EU?
I would expect the partner of either to relocate to the country of the working parent.
Is it the UKs fault that Lithuania (et al) are not so welcoming? Why do you feel it necessary the UK should be the open door, why is your question not aimed at Lithuania?
Personally, I have no problem with a UK national married and living in the U.K. with a working EU national. I would expect that it doesn't then mean every living relative also has access.
The challenging issue is, if they move to Lithuania, have children in that country, do you expect those children to then also have open access to the UK?

Perhaps I wasn't clear. If you've got a Lithuanian family that have been living in the U.K. for the last 10 years, let's say the husband has been in full time employment since day one, pays taxes and claims no benefit apart from child benefits. The woman looks after the home, and the family are self sufficient. When they go to Lithuania to visit family after we've completed our negotiations should they be able to travel backwards and forwards in the same manner as yourself.


Edited By: cchopps on Oct 16, 2016 09:34: Update
1 Like #14
more likely he just wanted to be the alpha male of a retirement block, nothing to do with the referendum.
people with anger problems will always find an excuse to kick off
#15
DarkEnergy2012
more likely he just wanted to be the alpha male of a retirement block, nothing to do with the referendum.
people with anger problems will always find an excuse to kick off


​agree, regardless of his defence saying he is of previous good character, he has most probably done this all his life and got away with it.
1 Like #16
cchopps
coathanger
cchopps
coathanger
This is a forewarning to all those wishing to see the Referendum result ignored.
I actually know a number of people who would take things into their own hands if the result is ignored.
Please don't blame the media, they haven't even begun to touch upon what would happen if Freedom of Movement was retained.
This runs far deeper than anyone has dared touch upon so far. There's passion, and then there's anger.
Beneath the surface, meaning street Polling etc, when you actually talk to people in private, you hear real aggression in response to the possibility of retaining Freedom of Movement.
I really do hope our politicians understand this, because so far, I haven't heard one Remainer recognise this.
WhIlst we're negotiating with the EU to leave I would imagine there is going to be discussion about those EU citizens that have set up home in the U.K. What do think will happen there bearing in mind some EU member states do not allow dual citizenship? Freedom of movement for a Lithuanian living in the U.K. who has children born here is a different to a Lithuanian wanting to come to the UK after Brexit. That country does not allow dual nationality. Would you expect the resident of the UK to be able to travel to Lithuania and back in the same fashion as a U.K. Passport holder could after we have left the EU?
I would expect the partner of either to relocate to the country of the working parent.
Is it the UKs fault that Lithuania (et al) are not so welcoming? Why do you feel it necessary the UK should be the open door, why is your question not aimed at Lithuania?
Personally, I have no problem with a UK national married and living in the U.K. with a working EU national. I would expect that it doesn't then mean every living relative also has access.
The challenging issue is, if they move to Lithuania, have children in that country, do you expect those children to then also have open access to the UK?
Perhaps I wasn't clear. If you've got a Lithuanian family that have been living in the U.K. for the last 10 years, let's say the husband has been in full time employment since day one, pays taxes and claims no benefit apart from child benefits. The woman looks after the home, and the family are self sufficient. When they go to Lithuania to visit family there after we've completed our negotiations should they be able to travel backwards and forwards in the same manner as yourself.
What you've asked is exactly what should be discussed during Brexit negotiations.

My own opinion, for what it's worth, is that if an EU national has been living and working in the UK for 5 years, had a child whilst residing here, should be given permission to remain. The cut off point is always going to be a contentious issue.
banned 2 Likes #17
coathanger
cchopps
coathanger
cchopps
coathanger
This is a forewarning to all those wishing to see the Referendum result ignored.
I actually know a number of people who would take things into their own hands if the result is ignored.
Please don't blame the media, they haven't even begun to touch upon what would happen if Freedom of Movement was retained.
This runs far deeper than anyone has dared touch upon so far. There's passion, and then there's anger.
Beneath the surface, meaning street Polling etc, when you actually talk to people in private, you hear real aggression in response to the possibility of retaining Freedom of Movement.
I really do hope our politicians understand this, because so far, I haven't heard one Remainer recognise this.
WhIlst we're negotiating with the EU to leave I would imagine there is going to be discussion about those EU citizens that have set up home in the U.K. What do think will happen there bearing in mind some EU member states do not allow dual citizenship? Freedom of movement for a Lithuanian living in the U.K. who has children born here is a different to a Lithuanian wanting to come to the UK after Brexit. That country does not allow dual nationality. Would you expect the resident of the UK to be able to travel to Lithuania and back in the same fashion as a U.K. Passport holder could after we have left the EU?
I would expect the partner of either to relocate to the country of the working parent.
Is it the UKs fault that Lithuania (et al) are not so welcoming? Why do you feel it necessary the UK should be the open door, why is your question not aimed at Lithuania?
Personally, I have no problem with a UK national married and living in the U.K. with a working EU national. I would expect that it doesn't then mean every living relative also has access.
The challenging issue is, if they move to Lithuania, have children in that country, do you expect those children to then also have open access to the UK?
Perhaps I wasn't clear. If you've got a Lithuanian family that have been living in the U.K. for the last 10 years, let's say the husband has been in full time employment since day one, pays taxes and claims no benefit apart from child benefits. The woman looks after the home, and the family are self sufficient. When they go to Lithuania to visit family there after we've completed our negotiations should they be able to travel backwards and forwards in the same manner as yourself.
What you've asked is exactly what should be discussed during Brexit negotiations.
My own opinion, for what it's worth, is that if an EU national has been living and working in the UK for 5 years, had a child whilst residing here, should be given permission to remain. The cut off point is always going to be a contentious issue.

Yeah it's going to be difficult. I think the trade etc will be a much easier affair.
#18
shadey12
DarkEnergy2012
more likely he just wanted to be the alpha male of a retirement block, nothing to do with the referendum.
people with anger problems will always find an excuse to kick off
​agree, regardless of his defence saying he is of previous good character, he has most probably done this all his life and got away with it.
It does read that he was always a bully, but may have stopped for a few years before the hammer attack & then this attack.
He will be sorted out within days in the Jail if he thinks he can be as aggressive & will be put in his place.
#19
coathanger
My own opinion, for what it's worth, is that if an EU national has been living and working in the UK for 5 years, had a child whilst residing here, should be given permission to remain. The cut off point is always going to be a contentious issue.
Anyone from the EU who has been in the UK for 5 years automatically receives permanent residence status. Permanent resident status is the right to live in the UK permanently. The government hasn't made any statements about revoking permanent residence status from those who have it. The only question is what will happen to EU people in the UK who have been here less than 5 years at the time we actually leave the EU (current target is some time in 2019). The estimate I've seen is that we are talking about less than 700,000 people (vs the 2.5 million EU people who will have permanent residence by then).

cchopps
Yeah it's going to be difficult. I think the trade etc will be a much easier affair.
In my opinion, if you think that the trade will be easy you are mistaken. It could be easy if we accept a bad deal but we have everything to lose so the EU will make it very hard on us. Our banking services are our primary export and many EU countries would love it if the banks had to move out of the UK (if UK banks lose their passporting).
2 Likes #20
Much of the anger over Brexit is caused by politicians of all parties (except UKIP) deliberately acting with indifference or ignorance of the mood of the silent majority of the U Ks population.
#21
coathanger
This is a forewarning to all those wishing to see the Referendum result ignored.
I actually know a number of people who would take things into their own hands if the result is ignored.
Please don't blame the media, they haven't even begun to touch upon what would happen if Freedom of Movement was retained.
This runs far deeper than anyone has dared touch upon so far. There's passion, and then there's anger.
Beneath the surface, meaning street Polling etc, when you actually talk to people in private, you hear real aggression in response to the possibility of retaining Freedom of Movement.
I really do hope our politicians understand this, because so far, I haven't heard one Remainer recognise this.
You know people who are going to break the law? Report them!
#22
shadey12
the bloke in the article also attacked someone else with a hammer. he got 4 years, so will be out in 2. a better question would be why such a short sentence for someone with issues.

Actually a better question would be why is mental health detection/treatment in this country going from bad to worse.
banned#23
kdk
coathanger
My own opinion, for what it's worth, is that if an EU national has been living and working in the UK for 5 years, had a child whilst residing here, should be given permission to remain. The cut off point is always going to be a contentious issue.
Anyone from the EU who has been in the UK for 5 years automatically receives permanent residence status. Permanent resident status is the right to live in the UK permanently. The government hasn't made any statements about revoking permanent residence status from those who have it. The only question is what will happen to EU people in the UK who have been here less than 5 years at the time we actually leave the EU (current target is some time in 2019). The estimate I've seen is that we are talking about less than 700,000 people (vs the 2.5 million EU people who will have permanent residence by then).
cchopps
Yeah it's going to be difficult. I think the trade etc will be a much easier affair.
In my opinion, if you think that the trade will be easy you are mistaken. It could be easy if we accept a bad deal but we have everything to lose so the EU will make it very hard on us. Our banking services are our primary export and many EU countries would love it if the banks had to move out of the UK (if UK banks lose their passporting).

In my opinion the trade negotiations can be sorted if there's the will on both sides. The EU most definitely will feel the need to punish us, but to my mind the EU's weakness can be our strength. It's all well and good Brussels making life as difficult as possible for us in negotiations, but it's German industry and French agriculture that they will sacrifice if they choose to punish us. Of course if we are charged tariffs, we will be charging, that just stands to reason. As we import more than we export there will be a loss for us there and for me that's the crux of the negotiations. For us to end up paying no tariffs we will have to negotiate on the freedom of movement of people. I don't buy into that we will see Nissan move. It's a negotiation, why will we have everything to lose? With regard to passporting I think we will insist on keeping it,. but even that won't be the disaster some may think. I just don't buy into the whole idea that it's some kind of naughty schoolboy sitting down awaiting punishment from the headmaster. I firmly believe we will be fine. I am an optimist, and I can't help that.

Negotiations will be intense and they should not and hopefully will not be plastered all over the press on a daily basis. We can second guess as much as we like. I have faith in the British public. We like a moan and groan, but I believe even those that shout loudly how they think we've made the wrong choice will roll up their sleeves and do what is required. I think 5 years of hard graft would be a sensible time frame to see where we're at. I think the EU will be in a worse position than where it is today and we will be thankful that we're on a different path. Of course I could be wrong, but you now have my opinion.

Edited By: cchopps on Oct 16, 2016 12:42
1 Like #24
splender
Nothing to do with Brexit per se, a typical brawl over nothing but hot air.

A brawl over Brexit.
#25
Kate Hopkins and the express?
Oh dear.....

Edited By: teh arn on Oct 16, 2016 21:18
1 Like #26
teh arn
Kate Hopkins and the express?
Oh dear.....

Same words different source...

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/brexit-supporter-attack-eu-referendum-european-union-remain-manchester-a7362956.html

A Brexit supporter died after being savagely beaten and threatened with being set on fire during a row over Britain’s membership of the European Union (EU).
Duncan Keating, 58, was attacked by his Remain-supporting neighbour, Graham Dunn, in Ancoats, Manchester, during a furious argument over the result of the EU referendum.

I got me a new fan so go troll someone else.
1 Like #27
teh arn
Kate Hopkins and the express?
Oh dear.....

Remain supporting Mirror...

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/brexiter-brutally-beaten-remain-voter-9047676
#28
Fred keeping the thread alive
1 Like #29
YouDontWantToKnow
Fred keeping the thread alive

Right on cue.
2 Likes #30
coathanger
This is a forewarning to all those wishing to see the Referendum result ignored.
I actually know a number of people who would take things into their own hands if the result is ignored.
Please don't blame the media, they haven't even begun to touch upon what would happen if Freedom of Movement was retained.
This runs far deeper than anyone has dared touch upon so far. There's passion, and then there's anger.
Beneath the surface, meaning street Polling etc, when you actually talk to people in private, you hear real aggression in response to the possibility of retaining Freedom of Movement.
I really do hope our politicians understand this, because so far, I haven't heard one Remainer recognise this.
https://img.buzzfeed.com/buzzfeed-static/static/2014-07/18/8/enhanced/webdr02/anigif_enhanced-buzz-21073-1405685355-4.gif
#31
Some bloke on twitter last night was pretending to have voted leave but said we need to remain because leaving would entrench division because 48% voted to remain.

Not a second thought from this guy for the division that would be entrenched if the government just decided to go against 52% of voters. He blocked me for pointing this out.


Scary how his stupid tweet got a lot of retweets and favs.


Edited By: Jack-L92 on Oct 17, 2016 07:43: /
#32
coathanger
This is a forewarning to all those wishing to see the Referendum result ignored.
I actually know a number of people who would take things into their own hands if the result is ignored.

I love views like this because all of the Brexit-arguments have been based on this notion that the Brexit-fairy will come along and fix people's woes. They moan about people being privileged and how unfair society is, yet you seem to think that if Brexit doesn't happen the way you want then there will be an uprising.

Sorry, but I simply don't see the Brexit-demographic being that motivated. A vote is one thing - you just have to be able to make it to the local postbox but actually going out, taking to the streets and affecting change? Really?
#33
Goading Remainers really are in absolute denial.

Bring on the Brexit Theresa, and prove democracy overrides greed, pomposity and elitism.
#34
coathanger
Goading Remainers really are in absolute denial.
Bring on the Brexit Theresa, and prove democracy overrides greed, pomposity and elitism.

I do love Brexiters who on the one hand think the system is rigged, society is unfair, politicians ignore the 'real people' and that an elite runs things.....

BUT

this time it's different, politicians will upend society and everyone gets on the housing ladder on March 31st X)

If there was a will to change society then it would've happened during the financial crisis but what happened? Oh right, we committed billions of dollars around the world to maintaining the status quo.

And what did you do? To paraphrase Conor McGregor 'You did nuttin'. X)

As much as you dislike me, as much as I think Brexit is a bad idea you've literally voted to give the elite and those with means an early Christmas present. Everything going according to plan right? ;)
#35
groenleader
What do we want? TIME TRAVEL!
When do we want it? Er, Doesn't matter really!

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