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Advice Needed: First Time Home Buyer

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Hi, Just need a little advice. We've seen a property for sale that we really like so going back for a 2nd viewing later this week. Just need some advice on what questions to ask and what too look out … Read More
demolisher Avatar
6y, 3d agoPosted 6 years, 3 days ago
Hi, Just need a little advice. We've seen a property for sale that we really like so going back for a 2nd viewing later this week. Just need some advice on what questions to ask and what too look out for.
Any help would greatly appreciated.
Many Thanks
demolisher Avatar
6y, 3d agoPosted 6 years, 3 days ago
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#1
price would be my first
#2
KapA
price would be my first
We know the price thats the first thing i asked :)
1 Like #3
make sure you get a good surveyor to do the full report not the bog standard ones the mortgage companies give free these days. believe me it could save you thousands in the long run ,
things to look for.
signs of damp ( smell or patches)
water damage,
even floors if they have laminate or wood down,
cracks in walls or ceilings some will just be surface others wont!
subsidence.
ask about any warrenttees that may be transferable, ie windows, damp course, gas,electric.
drive around the area after school to see what its like , if theres problems with kids being a nuisance, dont be afraid to talk to the neighbours,

never offer the asking price on the spot, go away leave it a few hours then offer a bit less most of the time you will need to haggle. if there is something wrong or your not happy about ask the seller to fix it before you complete the sale , get this is writting via their solicitor,

Edited By: vinylandtrinkets on May 24, 2011 20:26
1 Like #4
Ask why they are selling.
Ask about cavity/loft insulation
Freeview reception?
suspended 1 Like #5
Double glazing, boiler, water pressure, insulation
2 Likes #6
Running cost? gas, electric, water council tax.
Water meter or not.
What's the neighbours like. Any problems with the neighbours?
Ask the seller what his future plans are, up sizing or down sizing. If they are down sizing they may want to off load some furniture.
Ask about parking
Ask if they have found a place yet.
Ask about the boiler and heating, how old. Ask about local crime, have they been victims.
Have a good look at the roof, chimney, guttering, windows and frames.
Ask about drainage.
Has the boiler and fire (if gas) been serviced.
Try to work out how long you will be there for and how much work needs to doing.
1 Like #7
ask about boiler etc how old when last serviced, visit the area on a fri/sat night loads of quite areas become nightmares at weekend and usually it would be the same throughout school holidays,ask whats included washing machine etc so you know.
1 Like #8
1st question to ask: "Why are you selling?"
Beware of shifty/evasive answers.
1 Like #9
dont ask about local crime they are hardly gonna tell you if the area is a nightmare
1 Like #10
How old is the property op?
2 Likes #11
go on police.uk put the postcode in and it will show crimes round the area.
1 Like #12
Don't listen to jamstar, ask about crime, if they say it crime free, research the area like pinka has said, that way you can judge the seller integrity.
1 Like #13
Dont take it for granted that everything works. Fire alarm, lights, shower units etc.
#14
Thanks guys, keep them coming.

There downsizing. Checked the police.uk and only 1 reported anti social.
Not sure what year the house was bulit. Any way of finding out?
#15
Do you Think it was built in the 90s 80s 70s 60s or older. Is this your first house purchase?
#16
i would definatly check the parking if there is no drive, where we use to live it was an absolute nightmare, sometimes i had to park streets away, they had turned a house into a mosque so every evening from 7pm till god knows when the streets were jam packed and during ramadam it was worse, i looked it up and found the planning permission and it stated on there it was meant to be a womens drop in centre and that women would walk to it so it wouldnt cause trouble for residents, 99% of the time it was men going in and at a weekend kids, i hated it coming home from work not knowing if i can park outside my own house. i complained to the council like everyone else but of course they did naff all.
#17
take along someone who's purchased houses before its like everything else you learn from expierience,and they will spot things or ask things that you havn't
#18
Take some time to have a good look around outside, what is the parking like for friends and family...are there shops, pubs, or parks nearby that attract the local chavs to gather. Go back later in the evening to be sure... are the houses nearby in good repair, says a lot about the people living there. Although the house is important it is very important that the surroundings are comfortable as well
#19
solarforce
Do you Think it was built in the 90s 80s 70s 60s or older. Is this your first house purchase?
Yeh first time buyers. Im thinking either 70s or 80s.

pink-ka
i would definatly check the parking if there is no drive, where we use to live it was an absolute nightmare, sometimes i had to park streets away, they had turned a house into a mosque so every evening from 7pm till god knows when the streets were jam packed and during ramadam it was worse, i looked it up and found the planning permission and it stated on there it was meant to be a womens drop in centre and that women would walk to it so it wouldnt cause trouble for residents, 99% of the time it was men going in and at a weekend kids, i hated it coming home from work not knowing if i can park outside my own house. i complained to the council like everyone else but of course they did naff all.
There's a driveway for about 2-3 cars.
#20
demolisher
solarforce
Do you Think it was built in the 90s 80s 70s 60s or older. Is this your first house purchase?

Yeh first time buyers. Im thinking either 70s or 80s.

pink-ka
i would definatly check the parking if there is no drive, where we use to live it was an absolute nightmare, sometimes i had to park streets away, they had turned a house into a mosque so every evening from 7pm till god knows when the streets were jam packed and during ramadam it was worse, i looked it up and found the planning permission and it stated on there it was meant to be a womens drop in centre and that women would walk to it so it wouldnt cause trouble for residents, 99% of the time it was men going in and at a weekend kids, i hated it coming home from work not knowing if i can park outside my own house. i complained to the council like everyone else but of course they did naff all.

There's a driveway for about 2-3 cars.


thats good, my next house will be having a driveway lol where i live now is now fine but were planning on moving in the next year or 2 before my kids start school.
#21
You need to think about the houses surroundings, places of work or as pinka has said worship. Basically places that get busy at different times of day but not when your a viewing the property. Drive up and down the street, look at the neighbours gardens near the house you are viewing, nice well kept tidy gardens are good front gardens with car projects are bad unless you like bang and car engines revving on a Sunday morning.
#22
solarforce
You need to think about the houses surroundings, places of work or as pinka has said worship. Basically places that get busy at different times of day but not when your a viewing the property. Drive up and down the street, look at the neighbours gardens near the house you are viewing, nice well kept tidy gardens are good front gardens with car projects are bad unless you like bang and car engines revving on a Sunday morning.

There's no temples or mosques around for miles. The mrs use to live like 5 mins away and says its a really quite area. There are a few shops near by. Im gonna take a drive by 2moro evening to see if there's any groups of kids hanging about.

Edited By: demolisher on May 24, 2011 21:23
#23
Wooden window frames and facias? When we bought our last property, my partner done most of the chatting, I just walked about just picking and looking for faults. Check for unlevel floorboards, water marks on the ceilings of the rooms below the bathroom, en suites, storage tanks, etc.
Take your time walk around inside and outside the property with the owner and then again by yourself. Take your time.
#24
Check for bus stops as well, kid magnet
#25
solarforce
Wooden window frames and facias? When we bought our last property, my partner done most of the chatting, I just walked about just picking and looking for faults. Check for unlevel floorboards, water marks on the ceilings of the rooms below the bathroom, en suites, storage tanks, etc.
Take your time walk around inside and outside the property with the owner and then again by yourself. Take your time.

All double glazed. What are the signs of subsidence?
#26
Ask how long has it been on the Market, and how much interest they have had. Helps to gauge sell price, have you got an idea how much your going to offer?
#27
are last house had subsidence, i dont know much about it as my partner had bought the house before i met him, i do know it had big things put in the walls or something and im sure he had some trouble with insurance not 100% sure on that though, the subsidence happened years and years ago.
#28
solarforce
Ask how long has it been on the Market, and how much interest they have had. Helps to gauge sell price, have you got an idea how much your going to offer?

Since about aug-sept. About 4 viewings. Yeh ive got a number in mind.
#29
Normally a crack, cracks running along the mortar in a diagonal line possibly running to windows. also cracks in the plaster, if not covered by paper.
#30
What sort of a percentage are you thinking of knocking off the asking price?
#31
solarforce
What sort of a percentage are you thinking of knocking off the asking price?

About 5-7%
#32
I personally think that's a little low, I would be looking at more 10/12% and don't be embarrassed by making such an offer, all that they can do is say no, it gives you something to negotiate with. If you go in at 5% below you haven't much to
Play with, except offer full asking which shouldnt happen with a house that has been
On the Market since aug with 4 viewings.

Edited By: solarforce on May 24, 2011 22:00
#33
solarforce
I personally think that's a little low, I would be looking at more 10/12% and don't be embarrassed by making such an offer, all that they can do is say no, it gives you something to negotiate with. If you go in at 5% below you haven't much to
Play with, except offer full asking which shouldnt happen that has been
On the Market since aug with 4 viewings.

Tbh we really want it, Its the 1st house that we both really like. Also ive looked for houses in the same price range and nothing compares to it.


Edited By: demolisher on May 24, 2011 22:03
#34
I think you would be hard pushed to find someone who is buying a house who doesn't really like it, both houses that we have bought, we both knew that this was the house for us with in about a minute of walking into them. You have still got to go through the process of asking questions,and looking for faults or potential faults and the make an offer. They want to sell it as much as you want to buy it, but your need is greater, you will need the money to change and to pay the bills. If you can save a couple of % of of the sale price it's worth it. Just because you love and want it doesn't mean you have to pay full asking. When the estate agents puts a sale price on the property they say we will put it up at this and we should achieve this, if you come in at that price on your first offer, the estate agent will encourage them to hold off until the second offer, or even 3rd offer.
#35
You need to ask
Is there any history of the house or near by flooding
Any neighbor disputes or loud music etc
banned#36
solarforce
Don't listen to jamstar, ask about crime, if they say it crime free, research the area like pinka has said, that way you can judge the seller integrity.

agreed - I believe you can actually sue for damages if they lie about info like this
#38
solarforce
I personally think that's a little low, I would be looking at more 10/12% and don't be embarrassed by making such an offer, all that they can do is say no, it gives you something to negotiate with. If you go in at 5% below you haven't much to
Play with, except offer full asking which shouldnt happen with a house that has been
On the Market since aug with 4 viewings.

I agree, start at around 15% and haggle like hell.

I USED TO BE, notice the past tense so no sarcastic comments please, an estate agent and as you are in a strong position (FTB) then go for it. Like the man said they can only say no.

Also never forget the agent is working for and being paid by the seller...not you!

Good luck.
#39
I don't know your finances but you don't want to agree a price close to the asking and the surveyor sets the value lower than sale price. Find out if the price has been reduced at all since aug, if not there is a good chance that it's already overpriced, google the address to see if you can find some old ads from other estate agents. Check the land register to find out sale price of the other houses in the street.
#40
Check out mouseprice website.

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