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Advice on buying a computer tft monitor please

xxnic0laxx Avatar
6y, 10m agoPosted 6 years, 10 months ago
I'm completely clueless about monitors. I want a 21" monitor to hook up to my MacBook pro. I'll be using it mainly for photoshop, illustrator & flash so I need it quite clear. The apple one is too expensive at £649 can anyone recommend one or give me some information on what specs I need?
xxnic0laxx Avatar
6y, 10m agoPosted 6 years, 10 months ago
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#1
This may help

http://reviews.cnet.com/monitor-buying-guide/

Or search with Google for "Guide to buying a TFT" or similar.
#2
http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&source=hp&q=NEC+MultiSync+P221W+22+inch+Wide+TFT+LCD+Monitor&btnG=Google+Search&meta=&aq=null&oq=

find cheapest price for this monitor . Use some wisdom when deciding which company to buy from as some will be fake/scam maybe.


jaguarskx wrote :


You need to do a lot of research to find out what type of panel an LCD monitor uses. In other words: GOOGLE. I probably spent in excess of 50 hours doing research over the course of 9 months before deciding on the 26" NEC monitor I bought last November.

TN Panel:

+ Inexpensive
+ Fast response time
+ Generally good enough for most people and gamers

- 6-bit panel tech *
- Poor color accuracy = bad for professional graphics
- More likely to have image artifacts in both pictures and video
- Poor viewing angles (anything less than 178/178 viewing angle is TN) - images washes out or turns negative.
- Poor black levels
- Seems to be more prone to backlight bleeding. (all LCD panels suffers some level of backlight bleeding)

S-PVA / P-MVA Panels:

+ 8-bit panel tech **
+ Great black levels
+ Good color accuracy - good enough for professional graphics (but IPS panel tech is even better; more expensive too)
+ Good viewing angle (178/178) - colors starts to wash out at more extreme angles than TN panels
+ Less prone to image artifacts in pictures and video


- More expensive
- Slower response time

==============================================

* 6-bit panel tech means 6-bits are used to represent each color (red, green, blue) in binary. That means "2 to the power of 6" = 2^6 = multiply the number by itself 6 times = 64.

There are 64 shades of each color (R, G, B); to determine the number of colors simply multiply the number of shades 64^3 = 64 x 64 x 64 = 262,144 colors. That works out to 256K colors (1k in "PC language" = 1,024; 262,144 / 1,024 = 256k).

There for a 6-bit panel can only produce 256k colors, not 16.7 million colors. Thru a process called dithering these 256k colors are basically blended together to estimate (guess-timating) the remaining 16.2 - 16.5 million colors. This is why a TN panel is:

1. Poor choice if you are a graphics professional.
2. Image artifacts in both pictures and video (especially HD video)
3. Poor black levels
4. Possible color banding - Shades of colors do not transition smoothly from dark to light. For example, black transitions to white from left to white on the screen. You should see black smoothly turning to dark gray, medium gray, light gray, then finally white. Color banding will mean you will see actual columns (bands) of colors shifting from darker to lighter colors.

Note: Sometimes manufacturers will actually list "8-bit" instead of "6-bit" because it "adds" an extra 2-bit for dithering purposes and is sometime referred to as Frame Rate Control (FRC). Not absolutely sure if FRC is related to dithering, but nevertheless it is still a "6-bit" panel for all intents and purposes. Manufactures are simply trying to confuse the consumer.


** 8-bit panels - 8-bits used for each color (R, G, B) that means 2^8 = 256 shades of each color. Multiply shades to get total number of colors = 256 x 256 x 256 = 256^3 = 16.7 million colors.

8-bit panels generally have slower response times than TN panels because they need time to actually "calc and display the other 16.5 million real colors" that a TN panel cannot display.

======================================================================



The Nec above uses PVA lcd panel technology
#3
dontasciime
http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&source=hp&q=NEC+MultiSync+P221W+22+inch+Wide+TFT+LCD+Monitor&btnG=Google+Search&meta=&aq=null&oq=

find cheapest price for this monitor . Use some wisdom when deciding which company to buy from as some will be fake/scam maybe.


That looks like it's long discontinued. The current equivalent is probably the IPS-based EA231WMi.

And you do want to avoid all TN screens. I don't know how bad the colour issue is with current dithering (which is a lot better than it was) and blacklight bleeding and black level issues aren't TN specific but they do still have inconsistent colour across the screen due to their abysmal viewing angles.

Is a 21" screen essential? Most of the good but not top quality screens have moved to bigger sizes these days so you won't have that much choice. Off the top of my head in 20-22" there is only the Dell 2007FP (1600x1200, IPS), Dell 2209WA (1680x1050, IPS), Samsung F2080 (1600x900, PVA) and HP LP2275w (1680x1050, PVA).

What sort of colour gamut are you looking for? For flash I guess you want sRGB but is your photoshop and illustrator work in the same colour space or do you need a bigger one?
#4
EndlessWaves
That looks like it's long discontinued. The current equivalent is probably the IPS-based EA231WMi.

And you do want to avoid all TN screens. I don't know how bad the colour issue is with current dithering (which is a lot better than it was) and blacklight bleeding and black level issues aren't TN specific but they do still have inconsistent colour across the screen due to their abysmal viewing angles.

Is a 21" screen essential? Most of the good but not top quality screens have moved to bigger sizes these days so you won't have that much choice. Off the top of my head in 20-22" there is only the Dell 2007FP (1600x1200, IPS), Dell 2209WA (1680x1050, IPS), Samsung F2080 (1600x900, PVA) and HP LP2275w (1680x1050, PVA).

What sort of colour gamut are you looking for? For flash I guess you want sRGB but is your photoshop and illustrator work in the same colour space or do you need a bigger one?


No it doesn't have to be 21", I was just wanting it not to be too big. Yeah I use RGB and CMYK. I'm not sure what colour gamut is and colour space, so I can't say.

I should have mentioned I only want to spend about £120 - £150 max.
#5
Anyone else recommend a monitor in my price range?
#6
MultiSync® EA231WMi



Size 23"
Aspect Ratio 16:9
Brightness [cd/m²] 300
Contrast 1000:1
Resolution (optimum) 1920 x 1080
Response Time [ms] 14


Price £ 285
suggested street price
(Price excluding VAT)



Panel Technology IPS TFT
Screen Size [inch/cm] 23 / 58.4
Pixel Pitch [mm] 0.265
Viewing Angle [°] 178 horizontal / 178 vertical (typ. at contrast ratio 10:1); 178 horizontal / 178 vertical (typ. at contrast ratio 5:1)
Screen Aspect Ratio 16:9
Contrast Ratio (typ.) 1000:1
Brightness (typ.) [cd/m²] 270, (300 max)
Response Time (typ.) [ms] 14
Colours [Mio.] 16.77
Horizontal Frequency [kHz] 30 - 83
Vertical Frequency [Hz] 50 - 75
Optimum Resolution 1920 x 1080 at 60 Hz
Supported Resolutions 1920 x 1200; 1600 x 1200; 1440 x 900; 1400 x 1050; 1360 x 768; 1280 x 1024; 1280 x 960; 1280 x 768; 1152 x 864; 1024 x 768; 800 x 600; 640 x 480
Connectors Digital: 1 x DVI-D (with HDCP); 1 x Display Port Analog: 1 x mini D-sub 15 pin; USB (1 up; 4 down)
Plug & Play DDC2B/2Bi; EDID Standard; VESA DDC/CI
Adjust Functions Audio Volume / Lock-Out; Auto Adjust; Auto Brightness; Colour Temperature Control; Contrast; DV Mode; EcoMode; Fine Adjust (analog); Intelligent Power Management; LED Brightness; Language Select; Monitor Information; NTAA (Non-Touch-Auto-Adjustment); On-Screen-Display (OSD) lock-out; Power-Off Timer; sRGB
Safety and Ergonomics CCC; CE; EPEAT Silver™; EPEAT™ Gold (black version); Energy Star 5.0; FCC Class B; GEEA/Energy Label; ISO 9241-307 (pixel failure class I); MPR II/ MPR III; PCT/Gost; RoHS; TCO 5.0; TÜV Ergonomics; TÜV GS; UL/C-UL or CSA
Power Consumption on Mode [W] 43 (typ.); 33 (Eco Mode 1)
Stand-by Mode [W] < 0.5
Power Supply integrated power supply; 100-120 V/220-240 V; 1.05 A/0.55 A
Ambient Humidity (operating) [%] 20 to 80
Ambient Temperature (operating) [°C] +5 to +35
VESA Mounting [mm] 100 x 100
ErgoDesign®: Height adjustable Stand [mm] 110
Screen Tilt / Swivel / Rotate [°] -5 to +30 / -170 to +170; 0 to 90 (landscape to portrait mode)
Dimensions (W x H x D) [mm] 550 x 379 x 220; Without stand: 550.1 x 329 x 71
Bezel Width [mm] 19
Weight [kg] Without stand: 5.8
Cable Management yes
Kensington Lock yes
Benefits Ambient light sensor for optimized brightness levels; Carbon Footprint Meter; Carbon Savings Meter; NaViSet®and NaViSet®Administrator compatible; TORO™ Design; WindowsVistaCertifiedLogo; integrated USB Hub; sRGB Support
Audio Functions 1W + 1W (De-activateable)
Colour Versions Black Front Bezel, Black Back Cabinet; Silver Front Bezel; White Back Cabinet
Shipping Content Signal Cable DVI-D - DVI-D; VGA - VGA CD-ROM; Monitor; Power Cable; Sales Office List; USB Cable; User Manual
Warranty 3 years warranty incl. backlight


Nice but a real shame they can't lower the response times in a quicker(time frame) to say 6ms or even say 8ms. Seems to be taking ages to get what many regard a quality panel tech to this level for a decent price.
#7
dontasciime
Nice but a real shame they can't lower the response times in a quicker(time frame) to say 6ms or even say 8ms. Seems to be taking ages to get what many regard a quality panel tech to this level for a decent price.


Well Prad's review said it was comparable to other IPS/{VA screens so I assume that's the tr/tf figure and the grey to grey figure is somewhere around 6ms.

dcx_badass
I've got a TN based LG I use as a monitor and a TV (built in tuner) and the colours are much better than my old TN monitor, and it has good viewing angles, depends what you need it for. Also you'll need an adaptor as macs use stupid ports.


Image editing is generally one of the most demanding applications. There are some tests here and you shouldn't see much difference between the top and bottom of the screen on the test images if it's got 'good' viewing angles.

xxnic0laxx
Anyone else recommend a monitor in my price range?


Are you not doing colour critical work then? At those prices you're not going to get anything other than a TN screen. BenQ are generally pretty good.
#8
EndlessWaves
Well Prad's
Are you not doing colour critical work then? At those prices you're not going to get anything other than a TN screen. BenQ are generally pretty good.


Not at the moment, because I'm a student, I guess I will soon enough though.

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