Any good advice, tips on Bathrooms, wall tiles especially ? - HotUKDeals
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Any good advice, tips on Bathrooms, wall tiles especially ?

snowtiger Avatar
8y, 8m agoPosted 8 years, 8 months ago
Have found a plumber at last, now just got to get Bathroom suite, shower & tiles.
Know absolutely nothing about this subject !! Any advice, tips appreciated ...
snowtiger Avatar
8y, 8m agoPosted 8 years, 8 months ago
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#1
Not something too many people know too much about I suppose !!

Something like this would be nice ... ! (If only my bathroom was twice as big .... oh well )

http://www.tradeplumbing.co.uk/assets/images/Bathroom-suites/BH-Sanitary-ware/Antonio-Bathroom-suite.jpg
1 Like #2
Couple of quickies....if you go into a plumbers merchant/trade-type place, ask for 20% on everything (this is their standard discount that they can give away easily). Some restrict to 15% on some items, but they only need a little push.

Dont mix china items in the suite - ie get your Toilet/Bidet/Sink from same manufacturer - Bath is different as these are often acrylic/steel etc. If you do mix and the whites are not a perfect match (sometimes you cant tell until you get them all lit in your own space) then you have little grounds for complaint - dont believe what some merchants tell you as they could be just trying to sell.

Lastly, we found you get what you pay for up to a point. Cheap means cheap and non-standard - replacements inpossible to find and problems occur. If you want sunken fittings (such as flush mixers) then pay extra for good quality manufacturer - good guarantee and good castings - this will make a difference in the long run.

Finally - good luck - we spent a while looking but are so happy with the result.
#3
marmalade47
Couple of quickies....if you go into a plumbers merchant/trade-type place, ask for 20% on everything (this is their standard discount that they can give away easily). Some restrict to 15% on some items, but they only need a little push.

Dont mix china items in the suite - ie get your Toilet/Bidet/Sink from same manufacturer - Bath is different as these are often acrylic/steel etc. If you do mix and the whites are not a perfect match (sometimes you cant tell until you get them all lit in your own space) then you have little grounds for complaint - dont believe what some merchants tell you as they could be just trying to sell.

Lastly, we found you get what you pay for up to a point. Cheap means cheap and non-standard - replacements inpossible to find and problems occur. If you want sunken fittings (such as flush mixers) then pay extra for good quality manufacturer - good guarantee and good castings - this will make a difference in the long run.

Finally - good luck - we spent a while looking but are so happy with the result.


Big thanks for your advice :)
1 Like #4
tip for your tiles - overestimate to take into account of breakages also any extra boxes you can take back for a refund

if you are doing it yourselves - buy an electric tile - cutter £15.00 in b& q - brilliant

we are just putting finishing touches to ours now

happy decorating
#5
holly100
tip for your tiles - overestimate to take into account of breakages also any extra boxes you can take back for a refund

if you are doing it yourselves - buy an electric tile - cutter £15.00 in b& q - brilliant

we are just putting finishing touches to ours now

happy decorating


Many thanks:-D
#6
snowtiger
Not something too many people know too much about I suppose !!

Something like this would be nice ... ! (If only my bathroom was twice as big .... oh well )

http://www.tradeplumbing.co.uk/assets/images/Bathroom-suites/BH-Sanitary-ware/Antonio-Bathroom-suite.jpg


that is gorgeous. :)
#7
marshallka
that is gorgeous. :)


Yes Isn't it just ..... not mine by the way ! just a pic I found on Google .... but I love these tiles & going to look for something similar
1 Like #8
It's got a shower screen but no shower! :?

If ya bathroom isn't that big, do it in white 8x10 tiles running horizontally and put a long mirror on opposite wall to bath.
Some cheaper tiles aren't glazed to the edge, so check yours are decent.
Make sure all the piping and wiring under the floor is rerouted to an access point, if putting floor tiles down.

Try and get a basin on a cabinet, looks better (imo) and gives more storage.
If ya rinse your hair in the basin, get a large one with taps at side so you're not butting a tap in the middle.
I prefer steel to acrylic baths as they don't get easily marked, but some don't like cold feel.

As said, ya get what ya pay for, don't be tempted with a budget suite.
#9
heres a tip

aim for something
1 Like #10
I find this site helpful for tips on how to do the job.
#11
Ooh nice touch if you can is underfloor heating - in the room size in the photo this would cost around £120 with digital timer and it makes a wonderful difference. We got ours this winter and it was amazing - also heated the room well as the towel rail is really only for heating towels. Is working our fairly cost effective too since the tiles retain the heat well and make your feet feel lovely. It also meant we could get rid of bath mat as floor dries almost in the time it takes you too! :-)
1 Like #12
Most helpful points have been mentioned, only points i would add would be if possible to buy all your tiles needed in one batch as different batches can vary slightly in colour, don't be tempted to use all purpose tile and grout use separate adhesive and separate grout, I'd prefer to use 8mm (slightly more than a standard 5mm )glass fibre bath as steel can be chipped leaving a black mark, if your not on a pressurised system,wire in a pump for the shower, use a plumber thats been recommended by others and lastly enjoy.:thumbsup:
banned#13
And dont just lay floor tiles straight on to floorboards. They need to go on a solid sub-floor otherwise they will crack.
banned#14
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[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Wall Tile Tips from a Pro[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Matt Weber[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]
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[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Installing wall tile is basically the same procedure as installing floor tile. And it offers the same advantages: flexibility of design; a wide range of colors, materials and patterns; and if installed correctly, years of durability. Ceramic or porcelain tile makes an attractive backsplash behind sinks and stoves, or encasing a bathroom or shower. It's a strong and easy-to-clean material that offers great decorative advantages for areas exposed to water, while resisting moisture intrusion and protecting the walls of your home. [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Extreme How-To [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]caught up with Larry Ricketts, a 40-year veteran in the homebuilding and remodeling business, to get some professional insight on how to install wall tile. Ricketts was working in the home of Mr. Jeni Doshi, installing porcelain wall tile on a new shower enclosure, including a decorative border to give the shower a nice, finished look. He notes that while wall tile requires a similar installation procedure as floor tile, there are a few things to consider when choosing tile for areas exposed to water.[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]


[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]The Right Tile for the Job[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Don't base your tile selection only on color and size. Not all ceramic tiles absorb the same amount of water, so you'll need to speak with your tile dealer about the right tile for a shower. “Nonvitreous” is the term for tiles that absorb the most water, and this type of tile should be avoided for showers, tubs and sink countertops. “Semivitreous” tiles are rated for low absorption, and can be used for splash areas. But for this shower enclosure, Ricketts went with a high-density, glazed porcelain tile that will absorb no moisture at all. Porcelain tile, specified by Mr. Doshi, ensures a long, attractive tile life in the shower and eliminates worries of water seeping behind the tile and rotting the wall beneath it. [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]The shape and size of tile is another option to consider. For flat areas, larger tiles of about 12 inches result in a nice, orderly appearance and are available in a wide range of materials. They can be cut to various sizes and shapes. Installing large pieces of tile can also be considerably easier than installing smaller tile. It simply takes less time to lay fewer pieces in the same amount of space, as opposed to an option such as mosaic tile. Mosaic is a good tile for small or curved areas because it is generally no larger than 1- to 2-inch squares. These small tiles can be more easily installed on a curve, because the joints between tiles allow the finished plane of tile to “bend” around problem areas rather than bridge them, which ensures the entire rear surface of the tile is securely anchored in mortar. Mosaic tiles are available with or without a moisture-resistant glaze.[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]


[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Surface Preparation[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Ceramic tile can generally be installed over nearly any clean, flat surface, as long as that surface can support the weight of the tile. However, for shower and tub enclosures, it is important to install 1/4- or 1/2-inch cement wallboard to support the tile. The wallboard, being a cementious material, will resist water should there be any cracks in the grout that allow water to seep behind the tile. Should this occur, the cement board will still protect the wall behind it. [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Use a carbide blade or circular saw to cut the cement board to fit the area to be tiled. Anchor the board with thinset mortar and galvanized screws fastened about 6 inches apart. Fill the joints with thinset, and use fiberglass tape to seal the seams and joints where the cement board meets the original wall. [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]
banned#15
[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Tile Layout[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]When it comes to tile installation, layout is crucial. The first and foremost rule of tile layout: Make sure your pattern is square. Before laying your first tile, snap a couple of chalk lines to guide the installation. First step is to measure and mark the midpoint of the wall's location. Because wall tile doesn't always extend up the entire wall, base the midpoint of the tile layout according to where the tile installation will begin and end. Snap intersecting chalk lines at the center point of the site, forming a square cross. Align an A-square at the chalk-line intersection to check that the lines form right angles. If that's not the case, then readjust the chalk lines. [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]If you're new to laying tile, it may help to mark the wall with guidelines that represent where the tiles will be located. Form a grid, with each line level and square. If you plan for thick mortar joints in your tile layout, then account for the spacing of the joints when you draw your grid. These lines will help you install the tile straight. If necessary, adjust the center of the grid so that the last tile at each edge of the wall is the same as its opposite side. In other words, the top and bottom rows of tiles should be the same size; the far left and right rows of tiles should be the same size. This ensures a symmetrical layout.[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Aside from the basics of a symmetrical, level and square installation, the style of layout is left up to the installer. There are plenty of options available to spruce things up, such as decorative borders, cap molding and accent tiles. When working with these decorative features, Ricketts suggests paying close attention to the focal points of the layout. He explains that when someone walks into a room, their eyes are drawn to whatever is in front of them. Keep this in mind when installing patterned tile. Your pattern, as seen with the decorative border that Ricketts installs, will inevitably have to break at some point. Because the door in this bathroom is on the left-hand side of the room when facing the shower, Ricketts breaks the border's pattern at the left-hand corner of the shower enclosure – the least noticeable focal point when someone walks through the door and into the bathroom. [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]


[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Installation[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]With your guidelines in place, make sure the wall surface is thoroughly clean of any dust or debris. Ricketts then suggests using a pre-mixed thinset mortar as adhesive (make sure the mortar is specified for high-moisture areas). Scoop some adhesive with your notched trowel and spread it evenly over an area of about 3 by 3 feet. Use the notches in the trowel to comb out the adhesive to form ridges. Hold the trowel at a consistent angle of about 45 degrees so the top ridges of the mortar have a uniform height. The pattern of the ridges is not important.[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]
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[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Apply the mortar to the wall, creating 1/4-inch ridges with the trowel. Press the tile firmly in place, making sure it is flat and level.[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]
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[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Next, press the tiles into place. To keep grout joints uniform, use small plastic spacers between the tiles. Spacers are usually available from your tile dealer. In this case, however, Mr. Doshi requested that the grout lines be very small. To accommodate this, Ricketts butts the tiles against one another which results in a very fine, hard-to-notice joint between the tiles, once the grout has been applied. After installing the tile, check it with a level to make sure the installation is straight. Repeat this process until the entire area is tiled. [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Sometimes tight or uneven spaces eliminate the ability to trowel mortar over the wall surface. In this case, “butter” the mortar onto the back of the tile just as you would a piece of bread (but with more mortar than butter). Notch the mortar on the back of the tile with a trowel and press it onto the wall as usual. [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Cutting Tiles[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]You'll inevitably have to cut tiles to fit the last rows, to fit around soap dishes, pipes or any other obstructions. The most productive and professional way to go about this is with a wet saw equipped with a diamond blade. If you don't own one, these can usually be rented from your local equipment supplier. A wet saw includes a brace and guide to stabilize the tile as you cut. This is also the best way to achieve a fine, smooth cut in hard, dense tile such as porcelain. [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Otherwise, a standard tile cutter can be used. Simply mark the tile where it needs to be cut and go for it. Tile nippers are also available for small cuts, as for fitting around pipes. Nip off small pieces at a time and work toward the edges of the intended cut. The edges of the cut tile can be smoothed with 80-grit sandpaper. Keep in mind that most plumbing fixtures come with escutcheons that will cover up rough edges of tile. [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Also, when positioning the cut tiles into the layout, try to keep the cut edges hidden as much as possible. “When using cut tiles, try to place the cut edge of the tile toward the far wall where the eye won't pick it up,” says Ricketts. “Keep those edges pointed away from where people will usually be seeing it, because they can become noticeable if the edges are pitted from the saw.”[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]In tight or uneven areas, such as corners and edges, it may help to “butter” mortar onto the back of the tile.[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

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banned 1 Like #16
[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Grout Application[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]With all the tiles adhered to the wall, you're ready to grout the joints. Use a rubber-bottom float to work the grout into the joints. [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]“I work the float in a diagonal motion,” says Ricketts. “Applying the grout at an angle prevents the lip of the float from dipping into the joint and removing any grout you're trying to apply. This keeps the joints smooth and full of grout.”[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Work the float up and down to get an even fill of grout. Then sweep the float across the tile surface to remove any excess. Remember, if you're tiling a tub or shower, make sure to use waterproof grout. [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Apply the grout with [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]a rubber float.[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]The grout will leave a murky film on the surface of the tile. Before it has a chance to dry, remove this film with a sponge and water. Just wipe away the grout film with one side of the sponge over an area of about 3 feet, then flip the sponge over and use the other side to remove any remaining film in the same area. Rinse the sponge and repeat. Swapping sides and rinsing prevents the damp sponge from accumulating grout, which can just smear the film rather than remove it.[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]In the case of tiling a bathtub, it may be smart to fill the tub with water. The weight of the water may be heavy enough to pull the tub downward, away from the tile and grout. Use a silicone or latex caulk to fill the joint between the tile and tub.[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]Tools and Materials [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• 1/2-inch cement wallboard or water-resistant[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]wallboard (amount depends on job) [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• Wet saw with diamond blade [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• Galvanized wallboard screws [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• Fiberglass tape[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• Pencil[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• Level[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• Tile Adhesive (Thinset mortar)[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• A-Square[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• Notched Trowel[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• Selected Tile[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• Plumber's Putty[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• Glass Cutter[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• Grout[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• Rubber Float[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• Sponge[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• Tile nippers[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• Caulk[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]

[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• Utility Knife[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#2F2F2F][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#2F2F2F][FONT="]• Sandpaper[/FONT][/COLOR]

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