Anyone familiar with the Harvard Referencing system? - HotUKDeals
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Anyone familiar with the Harvard Referencing system?

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Hi, I'm writing an essay that must be referenced in the Harvard style and have a fairly complex question. If anyone is familiar with the in's and out's of the systemm and is willing to let me pick … Read More
Rowedog Avatar
7y, 4m agoPosted 7 years, 4 months ago
Hi,

I'm writing an essay that must be referenced in the Harvard style and have a fairly complex question. If anyone is familiar with the in's and out's of the systemm and is willing to let me pick their brain, i would be most grateful.

My question: I wish to directly quote a quote within a book. Not only this, but the author of the book has claimed his source (of the quote) to be 'Private Information'.

How would i correctly go about citeing this?

Many thanks
Rowedog Avatar
7y, 4m agoPosted 7 years, 4 months ago
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#1
i think u source it as Anon.
#2
hi m8 you should always quote :

Direct quotations – this is when you copy another author’s material word-for-word. You should show the reader that it is a direct quote by placing the material in inverted commas. Traditionally, double inverted commas have been used (“) but it is now acceptable, and preferable to use single inverted commas (‘). Sometimes it is difficult to avoid the direct quotation as the author’s words may precisely describe the point you are trying to make. However, do try to avoid the overuse of direct quotations; try to paraphrase the author’s work where possible. Please note that when you use direct quotations, you must reproduce the author’s words exactly, including all spelling, capitalisation, punctuation, and errors. You may show the reader that you recognise an error and that you are correctly quoting the author by placing the term ‘sic’ in brackets after the error.
Paraphrasing – this is when you take another author’s ideas and put them into your own words. You are still copying someone else’s work, so you must reference it. You do not need to use inverted commas when you paraphrase, but you must clearly show the reader the original source of your information.
#3
eurgh i hate referencing essays thats worse part , good luck x
#5
That's a big help, i've been struggling with this one for about an hour and my 'cheat sheet' on referencing is fairly terrible!

Thanks

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