Anyone got much experience of Radon Gas? - HotUKDeals
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Anyone got much experience of Radon Gas?

fruityloops Avatar
8y, 1m agoPosted 8 years, 1 month ago
We have found our dream home and are nearing the stage of exchanging. However, we now find that our dream house is in an area which has Radon Gas. The sellers haven't been there long and haven't conducted any tests to find out the levels and now I'm really nervous.

I have done a bit of research but not seen any individual experiences, just the government website, etc.

Has anyone else found a house knowing it has radon gas present and subsequently bought it? What measures did you put in place? or did you just take the risk? I did read on the Defra website that you could create a bond held by the solicitors that would pay for any remedial work needed should it be necessary - and if not, it would be passed to the seller on finding the results were low.

Any help/advice gratefully received.
fruityloops Avatar
8y, 1m agoPosted 8 years, 1 month ago
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#1
i think its linked to lung cancer
1 Like #3
you need a lot of radon to get problems, most places have miute traces

do an envirnmental search, it wont cost more than about £30... it would come back during searches with the solicitors otherwise, but best to pay yourself to avoid solicitors fes to begin with.. there are websites that specialise, i forget their name but google is your friend!
#4
I lived in Northampton, which was supposed to be an affected area (I have read since that it occurs over most of the country). If it is an area that is regarded as affected the estate agent/ solicitor should be able to help you out with a survey.
The remedial work, about 12 years ago, was about £1500, it involved increasing airflow under the wooden floors and in the loft etc. After all the fuss, someone gave us a meter to try (a friend who worked for an electronics company that made such things) and it was all clear.
Try here http://www.ukradon.org/rms_search.php They give advice, surveys and even a home test kit.
I remember a big furore in the local papers abot 10 -12 years ago. Then it turned out that it was hyped, like everything else, by the interested parties. It turned out, if I remember correctly, that most houses that test posiive are still way below danger level. When we sold and moved to Cambridge, no one even mentioned it (It was the hot potato when we moved in)
#5
Lot's of places are built over the stuff, never heard of anyone having any real problems.

Mainly hype.
#7
As my memory of physics serves, radon gas is the stuff that has little radioactive particles in it. Lots of things have hightened levels of radioactivity, granite being one of them, but the crucial factor is what sort of radiation it is. Alpha, beta, and gamma are the types, with each being progressively larger particles. Alpha radion particles are relatively massive, and we're mostly safe from them, because our skin blocks them. Beta particles though, which I think are what radon particles are, are much smaller, and although the dead cells coating your flesh can block them, the living cells that constitute your lungs are much softer and wetter, and absorb them far too easily. Radiation causes cellular damage and cell mutation, and this in turn is what causes cancerous growths.

I know how much it sucks to let your dream house go, but, seriously, you've got to avoid this one. It might not cause you any damage, but think of your kids when you have them. They're much more fragile, and I do fear that the gas could harm their health. I'm sorry, but you've got to find somewhere else.
#8
Stay away, seen some programs on it. Have you thought how difficult it will be to sell in the future.
#9
That's what I was frightened you might say and did wonder about the saleability in the future.

I did buy a report from the UK Radon site where I had to enter the postcode and house number and it said there was no risk.
#10
Okay, I have their HIP in front of me and it says:

Do records indicate that the property is in a "Radon Affected Area" as identified by the Health Protection Agency?

Yes it is in an area where 1% or more of homes are estimated to be at or above the Action level.

Note: This answer is based on a survey of the entire local authority area. For an in-depth answer we suggest that you commission a specific radon search. "Radon Affected Area" means a part of the country with a 1% probability or more of present or future homes being above the Action Level. Such areas are designated by the Health Protection Agency which also advises Government on the numerical value of the "Radon Action level" (the recommended maximum radon concentration for present homes expressed as an annual average concentration in the home. Radon concentrations above the Action Level should be reduced below it and become as low as reasonably practicable). The areas are identified from radiological evidence and are periodically reviewed by the Health Protection Agency , etc, etc, etc.
banned 1 Like #11
Pavers
Stay away, seen some programs on it. Have you thought how difficult it will be to sell in the future.


15% of the country is on radon gas rich soil jezz :roll: it came up on our survey the solicitor said not to worry about it as it's completely normal in my area. You just need to open the windows every so often to give the house some fresh air.

http://www.ashfield-dc.gov.uk/g_lib/environment/radon.gif
#12
Risks of radon
Radon is a radioactive gas which occurs naturally. It has no taste, smell or colour. Special devices are needed to measure it.

Radon comes out of the ground. Outdoors, it is diluted to very low levels. However, in some cases the radon level indoors can build up to high concentrations. In such cases, it does pose a serious risk to health.

Radon is the second largest cause of lung cancer - the first is smoking. People who are exposed to high levels of radon are more likely to get lung cancer (much more so if they are smokers as well). It is estimated that radon causes 1,000 - 2,000 lung cancer deaths per year
banned#13
Map of America, it's really not a big deal.

All new homes in Radon Gas areas must be fitted with underground ventilation though

http://radontestkits.com/images/radmap.jpg
#14
I would also point out that I live on the same estate already although don't have a copy of my HIP at the mo as one is with the estate agent and the other with the solicitor so wonder if mine also pointed out the radon risk? By the exerpt I typed above, it makes it sounds like every single person under our local authority will also be told the same thing! Am I right?
banned#15
fruityloops
I would also point out that I live on the same estate already although don't have a copy of my HIP at the mo as one is with the estate agent and the other with the solicitor so wonder if mine also pointed out the radon risk? By the exerpt I typed above, it makes it sounds like every single person under our local authority will also be told the same thing! Am I right?


yes, when they bought the house
#16
Thanks for all the advice and info. Well, I viewed the HIP for my current house which says there is no radon risk and I then called my local authority who searched his up to date maps which told him that the road we were hoping to move to was very low risk so he was confused how I got this info, but then went on to say that I should call the HPA which I did shortly after, and they told me the that the reports available on the UK Radon site were house specific and were as accurate as we were going to get and were less than a year old - I told her I'd already purchased this report and it told me the house wasn't considered a risk.

Ho hum, well at least I now feel reassured (no thanks to the Seller's HIP Report) but it's been a useful exercise.

Thanks again.

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