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Anyone in the teaching profession? Does anyone know if schools skip grades like in the US?

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My son is doing particularly well in school (Currently in year one primary) and he is at a level where he is reading, writing and doing sums for year 2 pupils, and even then says it is easy sometimes!… Read More
ei8hty5ive Avatar
7y, 2d agoPosted 7 years, 2 days ago
My son is doing particularly well in school (Currently in year one primary) and he is at a level where he is reading, writing and doing sums for year 2 pupils, and even then says it is easy sometimes! So has anyone heard of pupils skipping grades/years at school or will it be that he will just get harder homework (Like he does now) until the others catch up?! Serious question! Thanks for any advice in advance!
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ei8hty5ive Avatar
7y, 2d agoPosted 7 years, 2 days ago
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#1
let him enjoy primary one! He isnt going to miss out on anything if he is pushed up a year...and if teachers feel he is exceptionally gifted they will, am sure, contact you.

have they contacted you - or r u just a very proud parent
banned#2
Do you have parent's evening?
#3
he might find stuff easy now, but in a few years might find things more challenging, why would you want to rush him through the system let him grow up with his mates!
#4
numptyj
he might find stuff easy now, but in a few years might find things more challenging, why would you want to rush him through the system let him grow up with his mates!


^^ this!!! Primary one is more for settling them into a routine and getting used to the whole schooling scenario! Not looking for the next Einstein!

My son has a January birthday which meant I had the choice of putting him into school when he was 4 or keeping him another year at nursery and starting school at 5. I just didnt know what to do but nursery staff said its always best to keep him at nursery for that extra year. Well my son is oldest in his class and just loves school - has sailed through. Not brilliant at maths - but he gets that from his dad!
#5
DLM
Do you have parent's evening?


Yeah, but it was like a month ago!
#6
This might sound snobby, but have you thought about seeing if he can get a scholarship for a Prep school which might have more facilities and time for someone who is gifted? They often have x amount of scholarships per year. Anyway, might be worth thinking about if the school is saying he is gifted and giving him extra homework which he finds easy and cannot do any more for him.
#7
bossyboots;8481978
let him enjoy primary one!

Agreed.
However if he is getting fed up with the work and complaining then you may want to ask about the Gifted and Talented programme. Every school should have one.
#8
Yeah, i think he should stay and grow up with his mates but the missus and I are a little worried he might start hating school because he always says "School is boring, the teacher always tells us to do easy stuff!". I don't think he is a young Einstein but he is just a little brighter than his chums I think!
#9
I've never heard of it.
Im secondary and we have students in yr 9 taking gcses and 10s/11s taking an AS level but they dont skip entire years.

If your son is doing that well it is more than likely the school have already identified him as G + T (particularly as he is getting harder work). But You can always call up and check/ request some extra work for him.
banned#10
Skip grades? Like go from a D to an A+??
#11
i think it depends on the school, my daughter was moved up a class for half a year but stayed in that class the next year. Also depends on if they have "space" in the class above
#12
I wouldn't worry until the later years, ie when he goes upto year4/5. I was an exceptional kid at my junior school and they accidentally put me in year 4 when i started (i moved around alot thus my parents didnt realise) when I should have been in year 3 and they only realised at the end of the year when they wished me happy birthday for august, to what i replied it was september!

So anyway I had to resit the whole of year 4 after being in the top 10 of the year already! So you can imagine how little work I done having to do it all again! Then in when i reached Year 6 for do my SATs they put me through my higher level (6 I believe, as 5 is the highest you can get at SATS) and me and 2 others from the school all got in the local paper for being some of the highest graded students in west sussex.
So although I didnt skip a grade, they did put my on my level 6 before i should have even started it (start it in year 7/8 at secondary school).
banned#13
ei8hty5ive
Yeah, but it was like a month ago!


Did they say he was a brain box then?
banned#14
ei8hty5ive
Yeah, i think he should stay and grow up with his mates but the missus and I are a little worried he might start hating school because he always says "School is boring, the teacher always tells us to do easy stuff!". I don't think he is a young Einstein but he is just a little brighter than his chums I think!


Not difficult in Salford :p
#15
Jetpac
I've never heard of it.
Im secondary and we have students in yr 9 taking gcses and 10s/11s taking an AS level but they dont skip entire years.

If your son is doing that well it is more than likely the school have already identified him as G + T (particularly as he is getting harder work). But You can always call up and check/ request some extra work for him.


He already gets 3 times as much homework as the other kiddies (He gets homework midweek on top of the homework he gets at the weekend) and I only noticed that the work was year 2 work in the last couple of days! He's also been getting year 3 reading books! I had to Google some pronounciations for that one! :)
#16
DLM
Not difficult in Salford :p


Very true! I've also noticed he is mingling more with the brighter kids too. I tell him to play with everyone but he doesn't seem to be able to get on with them as well... What am I doing wrong?!?!
#17
I got entered into the gifted and talented scheme when i was in your 4 and i never did year 5.
I went straight from year 4 to year 6 so yeah its possible to be moved a year ahead :)
#18
Personally I wouldn't class a child in year 1 working at year 2 level as gifted and talented. If you genuinely think they are very gifted then I would ask for further asssessment to confirm this; reading, writing and numeracy levels are a measure of attainment (what a person has learnt) not of ability (their potential to learn). If it was my little lad I would be letting him enjoy his time with his friends, plenty of time to grow up. Lots of schools get kids to do GCSEs a year early if they are able and have heard of year 11 students doing an AS level but not skipping years so early on. After all, would you want your child to go to high school at age 10, mixing with 16 year olds? That would be the only opion unless they repeated a year somewhere along the way. Extra homework for them seems a punishent for doing well to me; same amount of homework but at a more challenging level would be better as more does not euqal more difficult or more learning taking place. Finally, a good teacher would not teach at year 1 level just because it was a year 1 class but should differntiate for those at lower and higher levels anyway, so your child should still be doing work which is a challenge. (This is based on being a teacher for nearly 10 years in primary and post 16 education)
banned#19
ei8hty5ive
Very true! I've also noticed he is mingling more with the brighter kids too. I tell him to play with everyone but he doesn't seem to be able to get on with them as well... What am I doing wrong?!?!


Move to Wilmslow
banned#20
Which month is he born in?
#21
stewby
Personally wouldn't class a child in year 1 working at year 2 level as gifted. If you genuinely think they are very gifted then I would ask for further asssessment to confirm this; reading, writing and numeracy levels are a measure of attainment (what a person has learnt) not of ability (their potential to learn). If it was my little lad I would be letting him enjoy his time with his friends, plenty of time to grow up. Lots of schools get kids to do GCSEs a year early if they are able and have heard of year 11 students doing an AS level but not skipping years so early on. After all, would you want your child to go to high school at age 10, mixing with 16 year olds? That would be the only opion unless they repeated a year somewhere along the way. Extra homework for them seems a punishent for doing well to me; same amount of homework but at a more challenging level would be better as more does not euqal more difficult or more learning taking place. Finally, a good teacher would not teach at year 1 level just because it was a year 1 class but should differntiate for those at lower and higher levels anyway, so your child should still be doing work which is a challenge. (This is based on being a teacher for nearly 10 years in primary and post 16 education)


No, Like I mentioned earlier, I don't think he is gifted just a little brighter than the other kids and find schoolwork too easy and see him getting a little bored. Thanks for the input!
#22
numptyj
he might find stuff easy now, but in a few years might find things more challenging, why would you want to rush him through the system let him grow up with his mates!


[COLOR="Red"]J-Man speaking the truth.

You would be extremely foolish to move him up a year.[/COLOR]
#23
ei8hty5ive
No, Like I mentioned earlier, I don't think he is gifted just a little brighter than the other kids and find schoolwork too easy and see him getting a little bored. Thanks for the input!


Sorry, missed the bit where you said about gifted etc. If he's getting bored I'd be tempted to mention it to the class teacher or head as the school should be providing work which is challenging him. If he is well behaved at school then they migh not have noticed he is getting so fed up. I've seen some children's behaviour deteriorate quite quickly as they were so bored (not in my class AFAIK thankfully) in class and obviously nobody wants that to happen with any child.
#24
The JFK
[COLOR="Red"]J-Man speaking the truth.

You would be extremely foolish to move him up a year.[/COLOR]


Yeah, you're probably right. It's trying to strike the right balance between trying to keep him a child but that he's still learning and enjoying school...
#25
OP have any of his teachers approached you about this? They would obviously be the first to consider he should be moved.

Nothing nicer than a very proud parent:)
#26
The JFK
[COLOR="Red"]J-Man speaking the truth.

You would be extremely foolish to move him up a year.[/COLOR]


get me brah

numptyj keeping kids off the street and in the classroom since '08
#27
bossyboots
OP have any of his teachers approached you about this? They would obviously be the first to consider he should be moved.

Nothing nicer than a very proud parent:)


:) I am a proud parent! The teachers have mentioned that he is doing very (very) well in all departments on parents evening but have never mention moving up a class or ever said the word 'gifted', so that leads me to think he is just bright for his age. I still worry he will get bored though when he flies through his HW meant for year 2s and moans about class being boring!
#28
numptyj
get me brah

numptyj keeping kids off the street and in the classroom since '08


Fo sho!
#29
ei8hty5ive
:) I am a proud parent! The teachers have mentioned that he is doing very (very) well in all departments on parents evening but have never mention moving up a class or ever said the word 'gifted', so that leads me to think he is just bright for his age. I still worry he will get bored though when he flies through his HW meant for year 2s and moans about class being boring!


Every class has a bright wee star in it - and by sounds of it your son is just that in his. But as time goes on and they all learn more, other pupils will excel in subjects. Just let him enjoy this time as the first few years in school are as important at the last few. There will be more than enough pressure on him in his later years - let him enjoy this early stage:thumbsup:
#30
I agree with the others saying that you should leave him be in his own year and let him grow up with friends the same age etc. I was the same as your son sounds - never found work challenging (secondary school too), excelled at school and was always placed higher in reading ages, but I was never moved up classes and it didn't affect my experience of education.

I don't think it's too important at such a young age to think about progressing him through, just allow him to develop socially and settle into education, he's still so young. When he gets to secondary school age maybe you could consider further research into schools which have a specialised interest in gifted children if that's what you think he is by then.

For now why don't you consider having a chat with his teachers about how you can help him to progress in his spare time. What I mean is that you could ask them about the syllabus and research into books/extra work of your own accord rather than relying on the school to keep setting him more work. It doesn't even have to be school based, anything to keep him motivated to learn and to make him feel like he's being challenged.
#31
ei8hty5ive
Yeah, you're probably right. It's trying to strike the right balance between trying to keep him a child but that he's still learning and enjoying school...

[COLOR="Red"]
Think of it like this.

When your kid is in year 13 all his mates will be 18. They will be going out clubbing, drinking etc. and your son won't be old enough to go out. Therefore he will feel very ristricted about his age.

He'll also still only be 17 for some of his first year of Uni (unless he has a gap yah) and will therefore miss out on a lot of socialising which could result in him not making many friends.[/COLOR]
#32
The JFK
[COLOR="Red"]
Think of it like this.

[COLOR="black"]When your kid is in year 13 all his mates will be 18. They will be going out clubbing, drinking etc. and your son won't be old enough to go out[/COLOR]. Therefore he will feel very ristricted about his age.

He'll also still only be 17 for some of his first year of Uni (unless he has a gap yah) and will therefore miss out on a lot of socialising which could result in him not making many friends.[/COLOR]


What?

EDIT: Oh I get it now
#33
The JFK
[COLOR="Red"]
Think of it like this.

When your kid is in year 13 all his mates will be 18. They will be going out clubbing, drinking etc. and your son won't be old enough to go out. Therefore he will feel very ristricted about his age.

He'll also still only be 17 for some of his first year of Uni (unless he has a gap yah) and will therefore miss out on a lot of socialising which could result in him not making many friends.[/COLOR]


Sounds like an episode of Dougie Howser MD...:thumbsup: I'm not thinking that far ahead but point taken!
#34
ei8hty5ive
Sounds like an episode of Dougie Howser MD...:thumbsup: I'm not thinking that far ahead but point taken!


I'm sure your son will be sensible enough to know that going out clubbing and getting wasted isn't imperative in having a good time.

..and also clever enough to know that you don't have to be 18 to do it anyway. :p
#35
angelfairee
I agree with the others saying that you should leave him be in his own year and let him grow up with friends the same age etc. I was the same as your son sounds - never found work challenging (secondary school too), excelled at school and was always placed higher in reading ages, but I was never moved up classes and it didn't affect my experience of education.

I don't think it's too important at such a young age to think about progressing him through, just allow him to develop socially and settle into education, he's still so young. When he gets to secondary school age maybe you could consider further research into schools which have a specialised interest in gifted children if that's what you think he is by then.

For now why don't you consider having a chat with his teachers about how you can help him to progress in his spare time. What I mean is that you could ask them about the syllabus and research into books/extra work of your own accord rather than relying on the school to keep setting him more work. It doesn't even have to be school based, anything to keep him motivated to learn and to make him feel like he's being challenged.


We do, we do!! Library visits and extra work etc...Soaks up everything we throw at him!! Thanks AF...Can always rely on you for some good old fashioned common sense and life experience knowledge!!
#36
ei8hty5ive
Sounds like an episode of Dougie Howser MD...:thumbsup: I'm not thinking that far ahead but point taken!


But point JFK is making - is that you NEED to look ahead.

Best of luck to the wee fella :thumbsup:
#37
ei8hty5ive
We do, we do!! Library visits and extra work etc...Soaks up everything we throw at him!! Thanks AF...Can always rely on you for some good old fashioned common sense and life experience knowledge!!


It's not often I make a serious post, so I hope it was useful :p

Good luck with it anyway.

Night night.
#38
ei8hty5ive;8482101
He already gets 3 times as much homework as the other kiddies (He gets homework midweek on top of the homework he gets at the weekend) and I only noticed that the work was year 2 work in the last couple of days! He's also been getting year 3 reading books! I had to Google some pronounciations for that one! :)

Sounds like he might already be identified for G&T. Don't be put off by the pretentious name, it's a supposed to pick up children who are doing well and push them more (something like top 10%).
You should talk to his teacher as in my opinion being bored with school is dangerous. However as most people are saying be careful that he has fun at school and does not get stressed.
#39
My dd is 5 and a half and at our school, they move her up with the 7+8 year olds for particular lessons she's clearly excelling in. She enjoys it and finds it challenging at the same time. However, our school only has 88 pupils so she knows them all anyways which helps.
#40
it is done. i wouldnt advise it though - gives them serious social issues. just let them grow up with their peers, and be the smartest in the class!

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