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Anyone work in I.T - tips?

Narfette Avatar
6y, 1m agoPosted 6 years, 1 month ago
Hi,
Looking for some advice if anyones about that can help
I'd like to move my career into I.T - helpdesking / analyst that kind of thing. I have an unrelated degree and 5 years work experience in account handling, so not particularly relevant. (other than contact with customers on the phone)
Ive been looking around, people seem to be saying the best thing to do is get the CompTIA A+ qualification.. anyone in the IT industry agree thats the best way forward?

thanks for any help
Narfette Avatar
6y, 1m agoPosted 6 years, 1 month ago
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#1
Just go to a recruitment agencey, there are loads of positions about but the money isnt the best if its just basic stuff. Once you have some experience you could try doing a coruse as well if your job dosnt put you through any
#2
Isn't everyone doing IT these days? I thought (I may be completely wrong) that there are now far more people than jobs in IT?
#4
dont do it mate...it IT job market is dead...

also you can get as many qualificiations as you want but what employers are after is experience! And the way the market is at the moment, employers will have no problem finding people with experience willing to work for less ££££
#5
Helpdesk/Analyst a good start. Personally ive been in IT a good 12 years now & still dont have any quals apart from my GNVQ. Anyone can read or do an IT qualification, try n prove yourself by doing the graft. Maybe you'l get spotted if your anygood & moved upto 2nd line etc....

Classic saying goes 'It's not what you know, its who you know'.........
#6
I'd say the CompTIA A+ course is a good place to start.
#7
To put into context, we had one PM role up for grabs. There was over 200 applicants in one week. That was for a qualified role. For Helpdesk, I'd imagine it'll be far far greater! Sorry to put a downer on it but it's just the way the market is right now. A lot of people are out of jobs and IT was the easiest to cut during the recession as it isn;t normally seen as a "core business" for a lot of companies.
#8
Everyone moved in to IT a long time ago, the qualifications most people got were Cisco, Microsoft MCSA/E (etc), and Comptia. Comptia in my eyes, be it Network + or A+, is pointless but better than nothing I guess but even the bedroom hobbyist will have these skills . Even the basic Cisco CCNA gets you nowhere but having CCNP / CCDP / CCVP is more than likely what you need if you haven't got a degree in something IT related. You can spend thousands on qualifications and still not get back what you paid. It's a buyers market at the moment and every employer expects more for less.

Good luck in your search though

Edited By: simplyjimbo on Oct 11, 2010 16:42: .
#9
It is kind of cr**, just listening to people moaning about their computers or printers ect all the time.
#10
im happy to go in at the bottom - but most helpdesk roles are asking for some kind of IT qualification or knowledge.. dont particularly want to pay for the comptia course as the modules seem fairly simple. meh.
i think most job markets are flat at the moment.. dont know whether IT is more so..
#11
Narfette
im happy to go in at the bottom - but most helpdesk roles are asking for some kind of IT qualification or knowledge.. dont particularly want to pay for the comptia course as the modules seem fairly simple. meh.
i think most job markets are flat at the moment.. dont know whether IT is more so..


If you have a good understanding of hardware get yourself a good Comptia study book and read it, then perform a few dummy tests or buy / dl some cram papers, then book yourself a test at your local prometric centre. That way you cut of the unnecessary fees for the courses.

Edited By: simplyjimbo on Oct 11, 2010 16:42: .
#12
They all say that, most places ive worked always had people that werent from an IT background and didnt have any experience, just call centre experience. Perhaps it depends where abouts you are from, there is loads of basic helpdesk roles about here but really low pay
#13
victor99
They all say that, most places ive worked always had people that werent from an IT background and didnt have any experience, just call centre experience. Perhaps it depends where abouts you are from, there is loads of basic helpdesk roles about here but really low pay


Basic is what they are, simply reading from a script before passing you on to 'level 2' support. Typical ISP stuff, even a brain dead monkey can do that. It isn't IT helpdesk its just call handling.
#14
I went into IT with no qualifications. Worked at Tesco for 5 years, then straight into IT!

Take a look on cwjobs.co.uk. Thats where I found my job! :)
#15
simplyjimbo
victor99
They all say that, most places ive worked always had people that werent from an IT background and didnt have any experience, just call centre experience. Perhaps it depends where abouts you are from, there is loads of basic helpdesk roles about here but really low pay


Basic is what they are, simply reading from a script before passing you on to 'level 2' support. Typical ISP stuff, even a brain dead monkey can do that. It isn't IT helpdesk its just call handling.

But it is a start and you can pick things up...

I started in IT with PC ServiceCall basically talking people through issues and booking engineers. That was in 2001, I've since worked my way through Helpdesk > Broadband Support (when it was first introduced) > Service Engineer (not just IT equipment) > Level 2 Support and am now in a position where I look after Servers for a large company.

You start somewhere and build on it. If you've never been in that job before and have enough interest, you work your way up and through it.
#16
thanks for all the comments guys - very helpful
#17
Unfortunately it's true. You need experience these days.

That said, we start somewhere. I started working for Hewlett Packard for their consumer support.

Tech support is an easy job so long as you know anything remotely about computers. You need to know a fair chunk about Microsoft Operating Systems and Office suites. Without that, your not going to get anywhere.

If all else fails, look at mobile network call centres. I went in to Orange as a customer service rep, and ended handling their data dept because of my knowledge in IT.

Then from there, I went to work for Hewlett Packard again as their internal support.

Now I am a senior developer for a web design firm.

All with NO qualitifications what so ever.
banned#18
I'm thinking how much does it cost a company to have in house IT support. Seems to be a large employment pool. Start up my own business in IT support tell these companies i can cut their IT bill by a quarter. Me equals quids in. Anyone want to set up with me?
#19
No ive never worked anywhere that I had to read from a script, that would only work in the likes of ISP's as there are a limited number of issues, on a proper helpdesk you could be there all year if you where reading from a script. It is pretty easy to pick up the basics but.
#20
do cisco, microsoft, comptia exams in hardware or software. Hardware is easy no money there, all the money is in software because its harder :). your account handling exp/degree would only be usefull if you went into the finance route of I.T. other than that it would not be usefull. Your far better off getting your qualifications part time then try and get into i.t., i doubt an i.t. firm would employ you as you dont have experience plus you dont have any i.t. exams or qualifications, you have a degree but thats no use for help and support or implementation etc no offence like.
banned#21
Abz
dont do it mate...it IT job market is dead...

also you can get as many qualificiations as you want but what employers are after is experience! And the way the market is at the moment, employers will have no problem finding people with experience willing to work for less ££££

couldnt agree more - far too many IT grads coming out of India charging a tenth of the average wage here

its a dead profession in the UK now for newcomers

sour grapes? - you bet (but got a tidy million out of it while it lasted)

Plumbing FTW although even that boat might have floated

Locksmith?.......
#22
The IT job market is dead no doubt - it's a vicious circle trying to get a 'real' IT job without experience.
There are lots of people chasing very few jobs.
Most agencies are busting a gut trying to fill the same jobs.
Money has gone right down.
Having said all that - it will pick up at some point - but the money will never be like it was.
Do a starter ISEB Foundation exam for circa £125 (ITIL or similar) - get the course details for no cost off the WEB. See how you get on. The consider putting a CV out that shows a potential EMp[loyer you might have the right aptitude and certainly have made a start by getting off your proverbial.
banned#23
IT job market most certainly isn't "dead" as has been touted around here. It's as alive as any other job sector really, it's just there was such a prolonged boom period until a few years ago that people took it for granted it would continue like that.

If you're good then you'll get a job without any difficulty regardless of experience. Employers are looking for quality now and they're in the position to do so. I know a dev who had no work experience and only educated to A level standard who got a job in a former company I worked at. He was clearly head and shoulders above all the long term devs there who had degrees and 5-10 years experience each. He left after a year and started contracting and now earns 3-4 times more than his former colleagues and he's only 21ish.

If you can self train then exams are only about £100 each so you could get yourself to CCNP and MCSE/MCITP standard within a few months for about £1000 (I'm assuming you'll download all the material for nothing). You'd have to be pretty switched on to do it but you'd get a job with those certs anywhere really, especially if you can get a bit of work experience purely for a reference in IT as you can then oversell your experience and get away with it.
#24
LOL i.t is not dead, depends what sector of i.t. you work in. Everywere i go daily, new i.t. related technology all around me which is good for some but takes away others jobs (same way years ago loads of hand skilled craft labours, now we have robotics to do it, while ago i was at an event were a robotic basically constructed a house inside/outside..so if you think i.t. is dead damm what era are you living in)
banned#25
andyhunter
LOL i.t is not dead, depends what sector of i.t. you work in. Everywere i go daily, new i.t. related technology all around me which is good for some but takes away others jobs (same way years ago loads of hand skilled craft labours, now we have robotics to do it, while ago i was at an event were a robotic basically constructed a house inside/outside..so if you think i.t. is dead damm what era are you living in)

I dont think you understand what an IT job is about at all!
banned#26
master_chief
IT job market most certainly isn't "dead" as has been touted around here. It's as alive as any other job sector really, it's just there was such a prolonged boom period until a few years ago that people took it for granted it would continue like that.

If you're good then you'll get a job without any difficulty regardless of experience. Employers are looking for quality now and they're in the position to do so. I know a dev who had no work experience and only educated to A level standard who got a job in a former company I worked at. He was clearly head and shoulders above all the long term devs there who had degrees and 5-10 years experience each. He left after a year and started contracting and now earns 3-4 times more than his former colleagues and he's only 21ish.

If you can self train then exams are only about £100 each so you could get yourself to CCNP and MCSE/MCITP standard within a few months for about £1000 (I'm assuming you'll download all the material for nothing). You'd have to be pretty switched on to do it but you'd get a job with those certs anywhere really, especially if you can get a bit of work experience purely for a reference in IT as you can then oversell your experience and get away with it.

you are approaching it from a hardware angle which of course wont be dead

the rest of us (and I assume the OP) are referring to the programming side which is pretty much dead in the water due of the development work being shipped offshore.
#27
why do you want to do help desk work? people moaning at you all day, the phone always needing answering - I have done support for Brother and Sage for 4 years in the past - too much like hard work. I am sure there is plenty of work as nobody wants to do it.
banned#28
officegimp
why do you want to do help desk work? people moaning at you all day, the phone always needing answering - I have done support for Brother and Sage for 4 years in the past - too much like hard work. I am sure there is plenty of work as nobody wants to do it.

couldnt agree more - only 1 step up from telesales
banned#29
csiman
master_chief
IT job market most certainly isn't "dead" as has been touted around here. It's as alive as any other job sector really, it's just there was such a prolonged boom period until a few years ago that people took it for granted it would continue like that.

If you're good then you'll get a job without any difficulty regardless of experience. Employers are looking for quality now and they're in the position to do so. I know a dev who had no work experience and only educated to A level standard who got a job in a former company I worked at. He was clearly head and shoulders above all the long term devs there who had degrees and 5-10 years experience each. He left after a year and started contracting and now earns 3-4 times more than his former colleagues and he's only 21ish.

If you can self train then exams are only about £100 each so you could get yourself to CCNP and MCSE/MCITP standard within a few months for about £1000 (I'm assuming you'll download all the material for nothing). You'd have to be pretty switched on to do it but you'd get a job with those certs anywhere really, especially if you can get a bit of work experience purely for a reference in IT as you can then oversell your experience and get away with it.

you are approaching it from a hardware angle which of course wont be dead

the rest of us (and I assume the OP) are referring to the programming side which is pretty much dead in the water due of the development work being shipped offshore.


OP mentions A+ so he's talking about hardware/support. I did mention programming in a good chunk of my post though with my dev mate.
banned#30
csiman
officegimp
why do you want to do help desk work? people moaning at you all day, the phone always needing answering - I have done support for Brother and Sage for 4 years in the past - too much like hard work. I am sure there is plenty of work as nobody wants to do it.

couldnt agree more - only 1 step up from telesales


I've done help-desk and it's nothing like I imagine telesales to be. I guess it's dependant on the business but when I did it there was no pressure to hit targets, no abuse from the callers, decent enough pay for a first job in IT (on a par with most graduate positions I've seen at least) and a good laugh.
#31
Ha, I was thinking of moving from IT into Finance :-)
banned#32
master_chief
csiman
master_chief
IT job market most certainly isn't "dead" as has been touted around here. It's as alive as any other job sector really, it's just there was such a prolonged boom period until a few years ago that people took it for granted it would continue like that.

If you're good then you'll get a job without any difficulty regardless of experience. Employers are looking for quality now and they're in the position to do so. I know a dev who had no work experience and only educated to A level standard who got a job in a former company I worked at. He was clearly head and shoulders above all the long term devs there who had degrees and 5-10 years experience each. He left after a year and started contracting and now earns 3-4 times more than his former colleagues and he's only 21ish.

If you can self train then exams are only about £100 each so you could get yourself to CCNP and MCSE/MCITP standard within a few months for about £1000 (I'm assuming you'll download all the material for nothing). You'd have to be pretty switched on to do it but you'd get a job with those certs anywhere really, especially if you can get a bit of work experience purely for a reference in IT as you can then oversell your experience and get away with it.

you are approaching it from a hardware angle which of course wont be dead

the rest of us (and I assume the OP) are referring to the programming side which is pretty much dead in the water due of the development work being shipped offshore.


OP mentions A+ so he's talking about hardware/support. I did mention programming in a good chunk of my post though with my dev mate.

fair enough - missed that bit

point taken and I agree that the best devs I have worked with are the ones with BTEC diplomas at best. The ones who started after university with degrees etc were useless!
banned#33
What conclusion did the OP come to?

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