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are some foods pointless buying organic?

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as they are organic anyway? potatoes, mushrooms Read More
tonico Avatar
8y, 3m agoPosted 8 years, 3 months ago
as they are organic anyway?
potatoes, mushrooms
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tonico Avatar
8y, 3m agoPosted 8 years, 3 months ago
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#1
Organically grown as in no pesticides, chemicals used etc, no gm food
#2
OP - What do you think organic actually means?
#3
grex9101
OP - What do you think organic actually means?


i was thinking that as well
#4
grex9101
OP - What do you think organic actually means?


like the guy above u said
Organically grown as in no pesticides, chemicals used
#5
so you don't think they put chemicals on your spuds or shrooms?
#6
ChipSticks
so you don't think they put chemicals on your spuds or shrooms?


especially those magic ones. :-D
#7
i dont know i hears somwhere that they dont so it is pointless buying those things but i am asking as i am not sure if it was true or not
#8
AshleyRFC
especially those magic ones. :-D


lol:)
banned#9
If you want organic grow your own but you'll find yourself biting your lip as the bugs start to eating your veg, really expensive for farmers to grow organic.
#10
lumoruk
If you want organic grow your own but you'll find yourself biting your lip as the bugs start to eating your veg, really expensive for farmers to grow organic.


And i really cant taste the difference from the organic produce you buy in the supermarket tbh and i cant warrant paying the price, would rather spend the extra on beer, I was in Sainsbury's last week and a woman was complaining as they didnt have any organic salmon in stock:roll:, felt like slapping her with a wet fish:-D
#11
Good question ( and, of course really, everything that lives and grows is organic)and there really isn't an answer.
'Organic' foods are deemed to be 'organic' if they are grown or raised under the conditions laid down by whichever accredited association they belong to - those associations have different standards and rules one to another. The soil association is generally though of as having the most stringent rules. With livestock the debate gets even more muddled as organic eggs for instance can be produced under far less humane conditions than non-organic but still fulfill the criteria.
Is it pointless to buy organic foods? Is there any difference between them ( except for the higher cost of the organic ones)? The answer so far is that there has been little or no INDEPENDENT research to show any particular benefits, therefore, generally, it is pointless.
The Food Agency says:
Is the Agency for or against organic food?The Agency is neither for nor against organic food. Our interest is in providing accurate information to support consumer choice.

and
There are many different reasons why consumers choose to buy organic food. These can include, for example, concern for the environment and animal welfare. Eating organic food is one way to reduce consumption of pesticide residues and additives.
Consumers may also choose to buy organic food because they believe that it is safer and more nutritious than other food. However, the balance of current scientific evidence does not support this view


http://www.food.gov.uk/foodindustry/farmingfood/organicfood/

see also, re pesticides
http://www.food.gov.uk/safereating/chemsafe/pesticides/pesticidesmainqa/org

We don't seem to have moved on much from this:
http://www.fsascience.net/2007/01/09/organics_whats_all_the_fuss_about

Basically, the arguments have got bogged down in spurious reasearch and entrenched posisitons and there isn't enough decent scientific data.

You pays your money and you makes your choice!!!
#12
chesso
Good question ( and, of course really, everything that lives and grows is organic)and there really isn't an answer.
'Organic' foods are deemed to be 'organic' if they are grown or raised under the conditions laid down by whichever accredited association they belong to - those associations have different standards and rules one to another. The soil association is generally though of as having the most stringent rules. With livestock the debate gets even more muddled as organic eggs for instance can be produced under far less humane conditions than non-organic but still fulfill the criteria.
Is it pointless to buy organic foods? Is there any difference between them ( except for the higher cost of the organic ones)? The answer so far is that there has been little or no INDEPENDENT research to show any particular benefits, therefore, generally, it is pointless.
The Food Agency says:

and

ok thanks a lot for that answer:thumbsup:
http://www.food.gov.uk/foodindustry/farmingfood/organicfood/

see also, re pesticides
http://www.food.gov.uk/safereating/chemsafe/pesticides/pesticidesmainqa/org

We don't seem to have moved on much from this:
http://www.fsascience.net/2007/01/09/organics_whats_all_the_fuss_about

Basically, the arguments have got bogged down in spurious reasearch and entrenched posisitons and there isn't enough decent scientific data.

You pays your money and you makes your choice!!!
#13
I prefer organic bananas and carrots...I can really taste the difference in the carrots.
#14
defo buy organic dairy and meat, along with salad products

the amount of hormones they inject into cows to keep them nursing is shocking........and guess where those hormones end up :x

explains why all the kids in the family have asthma, eczema etc whilst we as children never had any of those problems :whistling:

plus organic chicken (from the butchers not a supermarket) tastes like chicken and has flavour
#15
bellabonkers
I prefer organic bananas and carrots...I can really taste the difference in the carrots.


I always buy organic carrots as we eat the whole carrot ( cept for the tufty bit on the end! )

Buy the value bananas as they can all be peeled anyway...

Buy the best meat I can get my hands on as you don't know what the animal has been fed or injected with... I'd rather be more sure than less.. if you see what I mean!

Buy organic milk as baby drinks that...

I just go for organic if it's something that we'd use all of, seems like its worth the cost then.
#16
All my meat, eggs, veg and bread comes from a local farmshop, not cheap at all but we can all tell the difference in taste quality and well worth the extra. Im currently growing my own veg and salad stuff this year and Im lucky as my parents have a huge allotment and always keep us stocked up with jam, fruit and veg when in season.
#17
bitseylango;5013518
All my meat, eggs, veg and bread comes from a local farmshop, not cheap at all but we can all tell the difference in taste quality and well worth the extra. Im currently growing my own veg and salad stuff this year and Im lucky as my parents have a huge allotment and always keep us stocked up with jam, fruit and veg when in season.


you should make your own breads bitsey :thumbsup:
#18
bitseylango
All my meat, eggs, veg and bread comes from a local farmshop, not cheap at all but we can all tell the difference in taste quality and well worth the extra. Im currently growing my own veg and salad stuff this year and Im lucky as my parents have a huge allotment and always keep us stocked up with jam, fruit and veg when in season.


luck you good luck with the growiing
#19
bitseylango
All my meat, eggs, veg and bread comes from a local farmshop, not cheap at all but we can all tell the difference in taste quality and well worth the extra. Im currently growing my own veg and salad stuff this year and Im lucky as my parents have a huge allotment and always keep us stocked up with jam, fruit and veg when in season.


That sounds lovely!

We had to give up our allotment as hubby's back plays up and it wouldn't be fair to prevent someone else from actually using it to its full potential.
#20
bitseylango
All my meat, eggs, veg and bread comes from a local farmshop, not cheap at all but we can all tell the difference in taste quality and well worth the extra. Im currently growing my own veg and salad stuff this year and Im lucky as my parents have a huge allotment and always keep us stocked up with jam, fruit and veg when in season.


My parents grow a lot of fruit and veg in their garden....I love their potato's and can't wait for this years crop. I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks there is defiantly a difference in taste.
#21
tonico
luck you good luck with the growiing

thanks.....I lost my lettuces to snails a few days ago but have put salt down now and it seems to be doing the trick

ClarityofMind
That sounds lovely!

We had to give up our allotment as hubby's back plays up and it wouldn't be fair to prevent someone else from actually using it to its full potential.


We used to buy meat from the supermarket and half the time it went to waste, I assumed it was my cooking :oops: but since we have found the farm shop they eat everything :)
#22
bellabonkers
My parents grow a lot of fruit and veg in their garden....I love their potato's and can't wait for this years crop. I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks there is defiantly a difference in taste.


I find that all the produce lasts much longer than the supermarket stuff......they gave us a large sack of potatoes last year and by the time we had munched our way through them all the ones at the bottom were as fresh as the very first ones we ate.
#23
bitseylango
thanks.....I lost my lettuces to snails a few days ago but have put salt down now and it seems to be doing the trick



We used to buy meat from the supermarket and half the time it went to waste, I assumed it was my cooking :oops: but since we have found the farm shop they eat everything :)


I've found that meat from our Sainsbury's taste's much nicer than meat from ASDA round here.

We do have a local butchers but my stomach is a bit of a hypocrit... I can't eat meat if it looks like it's ever been alive lol once it's in the supermarket all packaged up I'm fine with it!

No nice farm shops around here unfortunately but I wish there was! I would sooo love to move out of the city one day and live more simply.
#24
ClarityofMind
I've found that meat from our Sainsbury's taste's much nicer than meat from ASDA round here.

We do have a local butchers but my stomach is a bit of a hypocrit... I can't eat meat if it looks like it's ever been alive lol once it's in the supermarket all packaged up I'm fine with it!

No nice farm shops around here unfortunately but I wish there was! I would sooo love to move out of the city one day and live more simply.


you would hate the farm shop then as there are cows in the next field and chickens wandering around :-D
#25
bitseylango
you would hate the farm shop then as there are cows in the next field and chickens wandering around :-D


oh, I'd love the live ones lol

I'm a typical city girl-- think animals are gorgeous lol
#26
ClarityofMind
oh, I'd love the live ones lol

I'm a typical city girl-- think animals are gorgeous lol


We only live about a 10 minute car journey from Nottingham City Centre, best of both worlds :thumbsup:
#27
bitseylango
We only live about a 10 minute car journey from Nottingham City Centre, best of both worlds :thumbsup:


Sounds lovely.

My hubby didn't learn to drive til uhm 4 years ago so with the kids etc we were pretty limited to our lives in London and Florida. ( world's apart I know )

But since he can drive we've had so many more family adventures, hire a cottage somewhere, get in the car and drive off.

Our favourite places are the old cinque ports in the south east, really gorgeous skylines, sunsets... real England!

I went to visit Nottingham once when my friend was there at Uni.
#28
ClarityofMind
Sounds lovely.

My hubby didn't learn to drive til uhm 4 years ago so with the kids etc we were pretty limited to our lives in London and Florida. ( world's apart I know )

But since he can drive we've had so many more family adventures, hire a cottage somewhere, get in the car and drive off.

Our favourite places are the old cinque ports in the south east, really gorgeous skylines, sunsets... real England!

I went to visit Nottingham once when my friend was there at Uni.


We havent really explored very much of this country which is a real shame, have been to Yorkshire a few times and it really is beautiful, would love to visit the Lake District, a cosy cottage, just us, the kids and the dogs :)
I love living where we are being close to the city, yet a 5 minute walk away from the countryside.
#29
bitseylango
We havent really explored very much of this country which is a real shame, have been to Yorkshire a few times and it really is beautiful, would love to visit the Lake District, a cosy cottage, just us, the kids and the dogs :)
I love living where we are being close to the city, yet a 5 minute walk away from the countryside.


Where you live sounds ideal.

I remember the lake district from when I was a child.. lovely views and aching feet from all the walking lol

I've never been to Yorkshire, but I've had a few friends from there, lovely down-to-earth attitude, be nice to go there I agree x x

We often use Hoseasons or cottages4you to book a cottage. The fees seem so much higher though this year than the last few years. It will have to wait till all the bills are paid or no holidays for us this year!!
#30
Is organic fruit and veg better for purees for babies?
#31
gotta love the organic saga, this would include the 'organic' farms that are situated next to motorways.....i laugh hard at this
#32
xSpoiltPrincessx
Is organic fruit and veg better for purees for babies?


it means there should be no pesticides used in the growing of the fruit etc x x
banned#33
The great thing about organic food is that it costs more.

Because you've spent more money on it, you don't want to look like a chump so your brain actively works to tell you that the food tastes better.

This 'placebo' effect thus makes the whole world seem better to you. The cows will be chirping and the birds will be mooing and people may even say you're glowing - like they tell women when they get fat, wrongly assuming they're pregnant.
1 Like #34
FilthAndFurry
The great thing about organic food is that it costs more.

Because you've spent more money on it, you don't want to look like a chump so your brain actively works to tell you that the food tastes better.

This 'placebo' effect thus makes the whole world seem better to you. The cows will be chirping and the birds will be mooing and people may even say you're glowing - like they tell women when they get fat, wrongly assuming they're pregnant.


lol, if your cows chirp and your birds moo, you've eaten enough pesticide already and a lil more wont harm you.
#35
ClarityofMind;5018196
it means there should be no pesticides used in the growing of the fruit etc x x


Thank you, that's what i thought but this thread confused me lol x
#36
xSpoiltPrincessx
Thank you, that's what i thought but this thread confused me lol x


you're welcome, I always bought fruit and veg to puree up for our babies at home and would choose organic when I could afford that bit extra but I wouldn't be too concerned if the fruit you're using has to be peeled anyway such as bananas and whatever you buy wash it thoroughly first x x
#37
ClarityofMind;5018724
you're welcome, I always bought fruit and veg to puree up for our babies at home and would choose organic when I could afford that bit extra but I wouldn't be too concerned if the fruit you're using has to be peeled anyway such as bananas and whatever you buy wash it thoroughly first x x


:thumbsup: haven't actually started yet, have just been looking into it but thanks so much for the advice. :)
#38
xSpoiltPrincessx
:thumbsup: haven't actually started yet, have just been looking into it but thanks so much for the advice. :)


u welcome sweetie x x x
#39
Alfonse
gotta love the organic saga, this would include the 'organic' farms that are situated next to motorways.....i laugh hard at this


Gotta agree with that one. Even growing stuff in town with no pesticides or chemical fertilisers are bound to be affected in some way. I subscibe to this newsletter http://theecologist.org/pages/current.asp but must admit dont actually buy the mag. Sometimes can read some of the stories. Assume that one of them in current issue Drugs on Tap is bound to tell us about nasties in tap water.

Was also wondering something similar. Not trying to be crude but gents are often encouraged to wee on a compost heap. Adds nitrogen or something. But is this still a good idea if they are on meds of some kind? Will traces get into supposedly organic compost?

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