Asking for a pay rise, best way to go about it... - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HotUKDeals, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HotUKDeals app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

Asking for a pay rise, best way to go about it...

£0.00 @
Just after a bit of advice please! Been at this company for about a year now and im not a very good wage, joined the company straight out of uni to gain some experience however Im constantly lookin…
dre1988 Avatar
6y, 10m agoPosted 6 years, 10 months ago
Just after a bit of advice please!

Been at this company for about a year now and im not a very good wage, joined the company straight out of uni to gain some experience however Im constantly looking for another job to get me to the next step. I would love to stay with my current job if the pay was better.

I've never been in the situation where I've wanted to ask for a pay rise before so i don't really know how to go about it, should I arrange a meeting with the directors or just send an e-mail?

I have quite a lot of responsibilities at the company so I think i'm in a position of strength, if I left tomorrow they would be screwed.

Cheers for any advice.
dre1988 Avatar
6y, 10m agoPosted 6 years, 10 months ago
Options

All Comments

(24) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
Don't ask in an email. Ask for 5 minutes of your superviser / managers time for a quick chat.

When you're in there just say you don't mean to sound cheeky but with the current cost of living you are feeling the pinch a little and was wondering if there was any possibility of a pay rise.

Is the company financially healthy? If so I'd be surprised if they said no, especially as you're also saying you are a valuable asset.
#2
Mikey1610
Don't ask in an email. Ask for 5 minutes of your superviser / managers time for a quick chat.

When you're in there just say you don't mean to sound cheeky but with the current cost of living you are feeling the pinch a little and was wondering if there was any possibility of a pay rise.

Is the company financially healthy? If so I'd be surprised if they said no, especially as you're also saying you are a valuable asset.


cheers for the advice, think thats what im gonna do, the thing is im quite friendly with the directors, they are quite unprofessional in a way because they just laugh and joke about everything

I can imagine them just laughing and saying something stupid but I'll give it my best try.
#3
Mikey1610
Don't ask in an email. Ask for 5 minutes of your superviser / managers time for a quick chat.

When you're in there just say you don't mean to sound cheeky but with the current cost of living you are feeling the pinch a little and was wondering if there was any possibility of a pay rise.

Is the company financially healthy? If so I'd be surprised if they said no, especially as you're also saying you are a valuable asset.


I think they are, I have no reason to think otherwise, theyve just secured planning permission for a large part of the company to grow too. one of the biggest companies for what they do in the UK.
#4
"A PAY RISE", in this current climate... you're having a laugh.. (is what they'll say!)

You should get a increase anyway (cost of living). How much of a rise are you after?
#5
dre1988
cheers for the advice, think thats what im gonna do, the thing is im quite friendly with the directors, they are quite unprofessional in a way because they just laugh and joke about everything

I can imagine them just laughing and saying something stupid but I'll give it my best try.


Have you had an appraisal OP? That's normally the 'usual' time to request a pay rise and if you've been there a year, then you should have one. That's when you can say what you've done (officially) and when a request for more pay may be treated more seriously.
#6
Get together a list of duties you perform that you think they would struggle without you and let them know (nicely) that you feel that you have put a lot of effort into the position since starting.

Treat it like an interview and sell yourself, hint to them that you do not want to leave the company but to progress you may feel the need to in the future if no progress is made in your current position.

Has anyone else been a similar position and gone through the process?
#7
Disco
"A PAY RISE", in this current climate... you're having a laugh.. (is said they'll say!)

You should get a increase anyway (cost of living). How much of a rise are you after?


not that much to be honest, a few thousand over the year maybe.

Foxy102
Have you had an appraisal OP? That's normally the 'usual' time to request a pay rise and if you've been there a year, then you should have one. That's when you can say what you've done (officially) and when a request for more pay may be treated more seriously.


I did have an appraisal but it was after 2 months of being at the company, I should be due one in a few months time, Cheers for the help.
#8
greg_68
Get together a list of duties you perform that you think they would struggle without you and let them know (nicely) that you feel that you have put a lot of effort into the position since starting.

Treat it like an interview and sell yourself, hint to them that you do not want to leave the company but to progress you may feel the need to in the future if no progress is made in your current position.

Has anyone else been a similar position and gone through the process?


Yeh ive thought about that, ive put together a list of things I do and im gonna kind of present it to them, at the moment my job role is one thing but ive moved on to marketing, SEO, website work, and now and again I have to handle a few sales.
#9
dre1988
cheers for the advice, think thats what im gonna do, the thing is im quite friendly with the directors, they are quite unprofessional in a way because they just laugh and joke about everything

I can imagine them just laughing and saying something stupid but I'll give it my best try.


My bosses are the same as that, fortunately I've had an above inflation pay rise off them every year + a very nice xmas bonus each year. They aren't interested in that appraisal rubbish, I look after them, they look after me.

They may have forgotten and it could just be a case of giving them a gentle reminder. Speak to just one of them on their own or it could get a bit embarrassing!
#10
Mikey1610
My bosses are the same as that, fortunately I've had an above inflation pay rise off them every year + a very nice xmas bonus each year. They aren't interested in that appraisal rubbish, I look after them, they look after me.

They may have forgotten and it could just be a case of giving them a gentle reminder. Speak to just one of them on their own or it could get a bit embarrassing!


cheers pal!
banned#11
Never make the assumption a business would be worse off with you. Given the length of time you've been at the company fresh from University they would have no problem replacing you.

There's nothing wrong with asking for a pay rise though. Arrange a meeting with HR/Manager/Director and go in armed with facts and figures to support your claim. Ideally find evidence from job adverts that show what you could be earning in a similar role for example.

Just understand that they've given you a chance as a graduate so be grateful of that when going in too, make them aware you're extremely grateful for the opportunity and that you see yourself there long term.
banned#12
Most places aren't doing pay rises but are still doing promotions which in turn means more money. Its usually so it isn't unfair as only one or two people get a rise but promotions are usually looked on differently. So if you think you might deserve a promotion to a higher grade that may be best way to go
#13
master_chief
Never make the assumption a business would be worse off with you. Given the length of time you've been at the company fresh from University they would have no problem replacing you.

There's nothing wrong with asking for a pay rise though. Arrange a meeting with HR/Manager/Director and go in armed with facts and figures to support your claim. Ideally find evidence from job adverts that show what you could be earning in a similar role for example.

Just understand that they've given you a chance as a graduate so be grateful of that when going in too, make them aware you're extremely grateful for the opportunity and that you see yourself there long term.


...but do not wave these advertisements under the nose of the management you are currently working for.

They will get the impression you do nothing but scour the newspaper for jobs & hence will think that you will leave sooner rather than later regardless of any pay increase.

Try this:

"I have been speaking with a few friends in similar positions & they seem to have less responsibilities on a daily basis but are paid a similar amount. I know it is probably a bad time to ask for a pay increase but I wondered if you could give me an idea of when I would be able to approach the subject. I enjoy my job & see myself progressing to a more senior role, but I also am finding some months are more difficult than others with my outgoings."

BFN,

fp.
banned#14
fanpages
...but do not wave these advertisements under the nose of the management you are currently working for.

They will get the impression you do nothing but scour the newspaper for jobs & hence will think that you will leave sooner rather than later regardless of any pay increase.

Try this:

"I have been speaking with a few friends in similar positions & they seem to have less responsibilities on a daily basis but are paid a similar amount. I know it is probably a bad time to ask for a pay increase but I wondered if you could give me an idea of when I would be able to approach the subject. I enjoy my job & see myself progressing to a more senior role, but I also am finding some months are more difficult than others with my outgoings."

BFN,

fp.


I see what you're saying and I guess you don't want it to be too blatant. However I would say it shows a switched on career man who knows the marketplace and their worth. As long as you're genuine about wanting to remain at the company for a while then you should be ok.

There's no such thing as a job for life and businesses know this. Turnover of staff is good for them as well as the individual.
#15
fanpages;8680912
...but do not wave these advertisements under the nose of the management you are currently working for.
They will get the impression you do nothing but scour the newspaper for jobs & hence will think that you will leave sooner rather than later regardless of any pay increase.
Try this:

"I have been speaking with a few friends in similar positions & they seem to have less responsibilities on a daily basis but are paid a similar amount. I know it is never a good time to ask for a pay increase but I have taken on many extra responsibilities and feel that I am an asset to the company. I enjoy my job & see myself progressing to a more senior role, but I also am finding some months are more difficult than others with my outgoings."

BFN,

fp.

Some good points. I have reworded it by a margin. In this way you will be able to judge your managements attitude to you. If they dont feel you are an asset, it will give you more of a reason to intensify your job search.
#16
master_chief
I see what you're saying and I guess you don't want it to be too blatant. However I would say it shows a switched on career man who knows the marketplace and their worth. As long as you're genuine about wanting to remain at the company for a while then you should be ok.

There's no such thing as a job for life and businesses know this. Turnover of staff is good for them as well as the individual.


Yes, that is what I was aiming for.

Give them something to value your worth (like your desire to be there in the long term [as you mentioned, but I had not read by the time I had started replying]) as well as hinting that you may have responsibilities they had not considered, but do not ask for a pay rise; let them suggest it.

If they come back & say "...after consideration we feel it appropriate to increase your pay by..." then you have the desired result & it shows that they value your input.

If they come back & say "...we appreciate your commitment & we think we can look at your pay again in 3 [to 6] months..." then it shows that they are aware of your worth, but may not be in a position to do anything about it.

If they come back with any other response (or the duration of time has elapsed since they mentioned the pay rate would be looked at) then you know that your input is not as valuable to them as you think it is. You should then continue looking for a new role, but before you commit to a new position with another employer, ask for a further meeting to explain the situation & see if any money (or more senior role) is forthcoming then. However, this is a last resort, & it may backfire. They could keep you on for another month then make your tasks so boring or hard that you are enticed to leave for your own health. It gives them that month to find a replacement for you.

Dropping the "I'm going now unless you increase my pay" ultimatum is never going to go well & should be avoided with negotiation & open communication well before that point.

Never burn bridges during your exit "interview". You never know when you'll either need to go back for more work &/or a reference or two many years down the line.

If possible, before you decide to leave ask some of your colleagues (in an informal way) if you could count on them for a reference in future years. Gain their contact details then or very soon thereafter.

You could deliver the "I'm going now or else" speech & find you are walked off the premises with your outstanding pay in your hand.

Good luck.

BFN,

fp.
#17
Mikey1610
Don't ask in an email. Ask for 5 minutes of your superviser / managers time for a quick chat.

When you're in there just say you don't mean to sound cheeky but with the current cost of living you are feeling the pinch a little and was wondering if there was any possibility of a pay rise.


NEVER EVER do that, as a boss I couldn't give a fig about your cost of living and if you asked me in that manner, I would tell you to jog on.

However if you came to me at annual review time and said, I would like a xx% payrise, and justify that increase, by telling me what additional responsibilities you had taken on, how you had increased sales/productivity etc or you had done some home study to improve your skill set and thus your offering to the business, then I would give you the pay rise quite happily.
#18
WoolyM
Some good points. I have reworded it by a margin. In this way you will be able to judge your managements attitude to you. If they dont feel you are an asset, it will give you more of a reason to intensify your job search.


I disagree with your rewording of an employee's desire to get a higher rate of pay.

"Never a good time" versus my "I know it is probably a bad time".

Any employer who finds an employee does not want to better themselves sees an unmotivated individual who is not interested in bettering themselves or the Company.

Mind you, if the organisation was looking for somebody with no aspirations then that is a different scenario.

BFN,

fp.
#19
thanks everyone for your replies, they have helped me a lot!

i'll let you know how it goes. :)
#20
Gun and lots of shouting should do the trick.
#22
DKLS
NEVER EVER do that, as a boss I couldn't give a fig about your cost of living and if you asked me in that manner, I would tell you to jog on.

However if you came to me at annual review time and said, I would like a xx% payrise, and justify that increase, by telling me what additional responsibilities you had taken on, how you had increased sales/productivity etc or you had done some home study to improve your skill set and thus your offering to the business, then I would give you the pay rise quite happily.


Maybe my boss isn't a snob like you. If you don't care about your employees experiencing financial hardship because you're paying them a lousy wage then that's just wrong. I can just imagine how morale boosting it would be for you to tell your staff to jog on as you put it:roll:

And the questions that you've suggested he ask - you should bloody well know the answer to all of them as you're the one employing him!!

Thank god I work for people that actually care about me and see more as more than just an employee.
#23
Mikey1610
Maybe my boss isn't a snob like you. If you don't care about your employees experiencing financial hardship because you're paying them a lousy wage then that's just wrong. I can just imagine how morale boosting it would be for you to tell your staff to jog on as you put it:roll:

And the questions that you've suggested he ask - you should bloody well know the answer to all of them as you're the one employing him!!

Thank god I work for people that actually care about me and see more as more than just an employee.


I don't suppose DKLS would actually say "jog on", but I can appreciate the sentiment.

Have you ever employed anybody, Mikey1610?

All employees, no matter how well (or poorly) paid wish they had more, & managers (or owners of Companies) have more things to worry about that not being able to immediately recall the remuneration details of all their employees (especially if asked without prior notice).

BFN,

fp.
#24
DKLS
NEVER EVER do that, as a boss I couldn't give a fig about your cost of living and if you asked me in that manner, I would tell you to jog on.

However if you came to me at annual review time and said, I would like a xx% payrise, and justify that increase, by telling me what additional responsibilities you had taken on, how you had increased sales/productivity etc or you had done some home study to improve your skill set and thus your offering to the business, then I would give you the pay rise quite happily.


Couldn't have said it better myself. Employers are not there to make your life easier, you are there to make theirs easier. Prove (and you will need EVIDENCE) how much more you do now than when you started. Prove you intend to achieve more and progress further within this company (saying you're looking for alternative positions will NOT achieve this, and in my experience will be viewed as a hysterical threat.) I love people who think they are indispensible. You are not. No one is. Request a pay rise politely and formally, but you have to show you warrant it. Chances are they know you only took the job for a bit of experience and intend to move on. Why would anyone invest in you if you're not going to invest right back?

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Looking for Twitter login?
Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!