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Autism Quiet Hour being trialled @ Tesco

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Tesco have teamed up with Jo-Ann D’Costa Manuel the director of Autism Parent Empower to trial an 'Autism Quiet Hour' to try to help anyone with children with autism or additional needs. This wil…
millarcat Avatar
[mod] 1m, 3d agoPosted 1 month, 3 days ago
Tesco have teamed up with Jo-Ann D’Costa Manuel the director of Autism Parent Empower to trial an 'Autism Quiet Hour' to try to help anyone with children with autism or additional needs.

This will initially be trialled on Saturdays at the Tesco store in Crawley - hopefully more stores will follow their lead now!

Here's some of the changes that will take place in store:

• All staff undergone initial autism training and briefing
• Doors at entrance will be left open
• Quiet Hour signs placed around the store
• Instore music turned off
• Escalators at the back of the store turned off
• No staff packing shelves
• Display TV’s turned off
• Tannoy’s turned off
• Lights Dimmed
• Allocated quiet zones
• Visual maps and social stories available at Customer Services
• Visuals on each aisle
• Allocated till for payment
• Staff members to help pack to speed up process at till point
• Hand dryers in toilets turned off
• Public awareness.

Link to source and More information
Other Links From Tesco:
millarcat Avatar
[mod] 1m, 3d agoPosted 1 month, 3 days ago
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[mod]#1
https://westsussex-local-offer.s3.amazonaws.com/public/system/attachments/303/original/TESCO.png
#2
"Doors at entrance will be left open"

That's not going to go well when an autistic child is overwhelmed & makes a run for it.
2 Likes #3
I think the movement of automatic doors triggers uneasiness. Leaving them open would possibly reduce this. So lovely to see this store Trying instead of dismissing
1 Like #4
"Every Little Helps" I suppose...
#5
Probably best to leave the doors to function as normal but have a staff member or two on hand to help out/show how to go in and out. Leaving the doors open constantly is going to mean lots of heat escaping from the store.

It may be better to have sessions whereby those on the spectrum can gradually become familiar with the hustle and bustle of a supermarket. Like give a warning that tannoy announcements are going to take place at set times during the visit. Thereby when the individual goes again they are aware that tannoy announcements can happen.

Perhaps run small group tours. Although this won't cater for everyone.

Excellent to offer staff training too.

Overall a good idea and it's probably being done to raise awareness to the general public.; as environments can be very overwhelming to those on the autistic spectrum.

Edited By: thetarget on Jan 24, 2017 12:54
1 Like #6
Be interesting to see how this trial goes. We should probably do as much as we can as a society to help all members as best we can.
1 Like #7
fanpages
"Doors at entrance will be left open"

That's not going to go well when an autistic child is overwhelmed & makes a run for it.
CloJo1234
I think the movement of automatic doors triggers uneasiness. Leaving them open would possibly reduce this. So lovely to see this store Trying instead of dismissing
thetarget
Probably best to leave the doors to function as normal but have a staff member or two on hand to help out/show how to go in and out. Leaving the doors open constantly is going to mean lots of heat escaping from the store.
It may be better to have sessions whereby those on the spectrum can gradually become familiar with the hustle and bustle of a supermarket. Like give a warning that tannoy announcements are going to take place at set times during the visit. Thereby when the individual goes again they are aware that tannoy announcements can happen.
Perhaps run small group tours. Although this won't cater for everyone.
Excellent to offer staff training too.
Overall a good idea and it's probably being done to raise awareness to the general public.; as environments can be very overwhelming to those on the autistic spectrum.

Indeed &, without dismissing what the store is trying to achieve, because the designed time (9am-10am) is not solely for children/parents directly affected by autism, the "general" public will still interact with the kids to some degree, & this may result in negative experiences considered to be a failure of the incentive (when so many factors are outside of the control of the store staff).

The suggestion of small group tours is a good one, thetarget.
#8
millarcat
Tesco have teamed up with Jo-Ann D’Costa Manuel the director of Director – Autism Parent Empower...
millarcat
Tesco have teamed up with Jo-Ann D’Costa Manuel the director Autism Parent Empower...

I presume it is "director of Autism Parent Empower" [APE?] as Becky posted here:

[ https://www.playpennies.com/special-needs-support/autism-quiet-hour-being-trialled-tesco-crawley-170270 ]

... edit ...

http://www.autismparentempower.org/wp-content/themes/autism/assets/images/about-us-background.png

Edited By: fanpages on Jan 24, 2017 13:32: Added image with title confirmation
#9
Hopefully many will attend.

One possible issue is getting those with autism to go at that time if it isn't part of their normal schedule. Some planning is needed by family/carers to give lots of notice to the children and keep reminding them. Of course this depends on the individual as many may already be rather familiar with shopping environments. Even so the experience should be a little easier with the steps being taken by the supermarket.
#10
What stores are trialing this ? Please
#11
yup we must pander to those with issues.

how about parents just get their shopping delivered instead of expecting people to bend over backwards for them

and before anyone gets all offended, in on the spectrum myself.

Edited By: eset12345 on Jan 24, 2017 22:54
#12
Tiggrrrr1974
What stores are trialing this ? Please

[ https://www.playpennies.com/special-needs-support/autism-quiet-hour-being-trialled-tesco-crawley-170270 ]

"Jo-Ann has partnered with the Tesco Extra in Crawley to trial the first Quiet Hour on Saturday 21st January between 9am-10am continuing every Saturday thereafter."

Also see:

[ https://westsussex.local-offer.org/events/480 ]
1 Like #13
eset12345
yup we must pander to those with issues.
how about parents just get their shopping delivered instead of expecting people to bend over backwards for them
and before anyone gets all offended, in on the spectrum myself.
Whilst I appreciate your honesty and openness, I have felt compelled to write a response as a teacher of pupils with Autism. I value the opportunity, for those who need it, to experience a shopping environment that will gradually ease them into the harsh realities of what a busy supermarket environment is really like and the sensory overload that it creates. It is not about pandering or asking parents to do their shopping online it is about accepting the differences of each and every person and realising that adults and young people with autism, or indeed any other need, may appreciate the opportunity for independence and shopping in a more peaceful environment. Well done Tesco, I will be sharing this with parents tomorrow! :)
#14
brummie02
eset12345
yup we must pander to those with issues.
how about parents just get their shopping delivered instead of expecting people to bend over backwards for them
and before anyone gets all offended, in on the spectrum myself.
Whilst I appreciate your honesty and openness, I have felt compelled to write a response as a teacher of pupils with Autism. I value the opportunity, for those who need it, to experience a shopping environment that will gradually ease them into the harsh realities of what a busy supermarket environment is really like and the sensory overload that it creates. It is not about pandering or asking parents to do their shopping online it is about accepting the differences of each and every person and realising that adults and young people with autism, or indeed any other need, may appreciate the opportunity for independence and shopping in a more peaceful environment. Well done Tesco, I will be sharing this with parents tomorrow! :)


of course it's pandering, it's changing other peoples experience for the select few, it's the very definition of pandering to a minority.

should all labels be changed to french / spanish / german etc depending on the make up of your local community and to appease the 10 German people who live there? should everything be in brail for the few blind people that shop there?

Edited By: eset12345 on Jan 24, 2017 23:29
#15
eset12345
of course it's pandering, it's changing other peoples experience for the select few, it's the very definition of pandering to a minority.

...just like how supermarket home delivery started; pandering to the minority until it becomes accepted by the majority.
#16
eset12345
brummie02
eset12345
yup we must pander to those with issues.
how about parents just get their shopping delivered instead of expecting people to bend over backwards for them
and before anyone gets all offended, in on the spectrum myself.
Whilst I appreciate your honesty and openness, I have felt compelled to write a response as a teacher of pupils with Autism. I value the opportunity, for those who need it, to experience a shopping environment that will gradually ease them into the harsh realities of what a busy supermarket environment is really like and the sensory overload that it creates. It is not about pandering or asking parents to do their shopping online it is about accepting the differences of each and every person and realising that adults and young people with autism, or indeed any other need, may appreciate the opportunity for independence and shopping in a more peaceful environment. Well done Tesco, I will be sharing this with parents tomorrow! :)
of course it's pandering, it's changing other peoples experience for the select few, it's the very definition of pandering to a minority.
defintion of pander: to gratify or indulge (an immoral or distasteful desire or taste or a person with such a desire or taste). I wouldn't exactly call it indulgence- being able to shop without going into crisis!
#17
eset12345
yup we must pander to those with issues.
how about parents just get their shopping delivered instead of expecting people to bend over backwards for them
and before anyone gets all offended, in on the spectrum myself.

But that's what a compassionate society does - we make exceptions and allowances for those who need a little help. It's called empathy.

You clearly understand that because you actually tell us you're on the spectrum, so that we will make allowances for you. If you hadn't said that then some might attack you for being less than compassionate, but because you've said it then people will take a different view.

One hour out of a week to make someone else's life a tiny bit easier is not a hardship. It's the bare minimum.
#18
Don't have autism, do know that a quiet supermarket would be great....

WAIIITTTTT....my local 24/7 Tescos is as quiet as a graveyard by 23:00 usually, just like autism hour!
#19
eset12345
yup we must pander to those with issues.
how about parents just get their shopping delivered instead of expecting people to bend over backwards for them
and before anyone gets all offended, in on the spectrum myself.
Why should parents be forced to shop online when online u do not get the same as you would in store people need to be more aware of autism and consider people with and people dealing with autism on a daily basis it's not about bending over backwards it's about helping people live as much of a normal life and the right to do day to day things as anyone one else.
#20
More understanding security guards would be nice at Tesco, I had to leave the store as my teenager had his hood up but face was in full view unlike some shoppers who had their faces covered and were allowed to go around the shop like that because of their religion.
#21
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
eset12345
yup we must pander to those with issues.
how about parents just get their shopping delivered instead of expecting people to bend over backwards for them
and before anyone gets all offended, in on the spectrum myself.
But that's what a compassionate society does - we make exceptions and allowances for those who need a little help. It's called empathy.
You clearly understand that because you actually tell us you're on the spectrum, so that we will make allowances for you. If you hadn't said that then some might attack you for being less than compassionate, but because you've said it then people will take a different view.
One hour out of a week to make someone else's life a tiny bit easier is not a hardship. It's the bare minimum.


why does be being on the spectrum mean people wont attack my views? does this not say a lot more about the person who wishes to do the attacking than it says about me.

They will happily attack someone with this view, but not if they say they are one of these people such allowances are being made for.

Christ, what is wrong with people? are their morals so fluid that they wont state their true feelings?
#22
Lisha90
eset12345
yup we must pander to those with issues.
how about parents just get their shopping delivered instead of expecting people to bend over backwards for them
and before anyone gets all offended, in on the spectrum myself.
Why should parents be forced to shop online when online u do not get the same as you would in store people need to be more aware of autism and consider people with and people dealing with autism on a daily basis it's not about bending over backwards it's about helping people live as much of a normal life and the right to do day to day things as anyone one else.

how are they forced to do shopping online? who's forcing them to do that? I don't see anyone holding a gun to someones head.
#23
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
eset12345
yup we must pander to those with issues.
how about parents just get their shopping delivered instead of expecting people to bend over backwards for them
and before anyone gets all offended, in on the spectrum myself.
But that's what a compassionate society does - we make exceptions and allowances for those who need a little help. It's called empathy.

You clearly understand that because you actually tell us you're on the spectrum, so that we will make allowances for you. If you hadn't said that then some might attack you for being less than compassionate, but because you've said it then people will take a different view.

One hour out of a week to make someone else's life a tiny bit easier is not a hardship. It's the bare minimum.

it's not one hour a week though, all the people working have to have their schedules rearranged so that their work is completed or halted between these times, if there's 10 people meant to be shelf stacking for this one hour, multiply that by 500 stores and you have 5000 man hours that aren't as productive as they should have been, 5000 man hours at minimum wage is £37,500. but of course its only an hour

what if I visit the store and the shelf of cheese is empty? am I expected to wait an hour until it's restocked? if I ask a staff member will they be allowed to fetch me some cheese? what if I have a trolley with a squeaky wheel, will I be banished form the store for daring to push a trolley around in front of an autistic person? what if i'm partially sighted and need to use a reader to help me find what I want, will I have to turn the volume off and leave myself stranded in the store during this hour? what if my son / daughter gets separated in the store, will they be allowed to have a tanoy announcement or will they have to go around the store and pre-warn anyone that may be with an autistic person that there will be a tannoy announcement.
#24
eset12345
it's not one hour a week though, all the people working have to have their schedules rearranged so that their work is completed or halted between these times, if there's 10 people meant to be shelf stacking for this one hour, multiply that by 500 stores and you have 5000 man hours that aren't as productive as they should have been, 5000 man hours at minimum wage is £37,500. but of course its only an hour

It is only one store, for one hour, of one week (if the trial is not successful). If the trial is successful, then it may be one hour of proceeding Saturdays at that single store. If you don't visit that one store (at that time), then don't worry about it.

I am sure the Tesco Management have picked the busiest time of the week to inconvenience the most number of people (staff & punters).

Oh, wait, no, they've probably considered all this already!

eset12345
what if I visit the store and the shelf of cheese is empty? am I expected to wait an hour until it's restocked? if I ask a staff member will they be allowed to fetch me some cheese? what if I have a trolley with a squeaky wheel, will I be banished form the store for daring to push a trolley around in front of an autistic person? what if i'm partially sighted and need to use a reader to help me find what I want, will I have to turn the volume off and leave myself stranded in the store during this hour? what if my son / daughter gets separated in the store, will they be allowed to have a tanoy announcement or will they have to go around the store and pre-warn anyone that may be with an autistic person that there will be a tannoy announcement.

If it bothers you that much, & you really must be in Tesco at Crawley between 9am & 10am this coming Saturday, may I suggest you go to ASDA, or any of the other supermarkets in the area, instead?

eset12345
yup we must pander to those with issues.
how about parents just get their shopping delivered instead of expecting people to bend over backwards for them
and before anyone gets all offended, in on the spectrum myself.
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
But that's what a compassionate society does - we make exceptions and allowances for those who need a little help. It's called empathy....

May I suggest you research traits of an autistic individual, then re-read eset12345's last sentence again?

Either too much or too little empathy is probably in effect here.
1 Like #25
Being a mother to 2 autistic adults now. Shopping is not always pleasant experience it's also part of daily living skills that these people need. Sensory overload can be very frightening for someone with autism. Personally the more help and support offered to help with daily tasks the better.
1 Like #26
eset12345
yup we must pander to those with issues.
how about parents just get their shopping delivered instead of expecting people to bend over backwards for them
and before anyone gets all offended, in on the spectrum myself.

I'm also in the spectrum, and I would like to go out and do things without being stuck at home waiting for deliveries. Also, the quality of the product isn't guaranteed if you get it delivered. My husband refuses to get the weekly shop delivered, but at least I would be able to go with him if this was a regular thing. The dimmed lights would also be beneficial to my Irlens syndrome. It's about being inclusive, and accepting people who are different to those who are neurotypical. It's also only an hour, so it's hardly pandering to a person with a disability,
#27
It's an interesting idea, I'm just wondering how they chose the hour to which it will apply and what they will do with any issues that occur. I guess we will see.

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