Baby Blue Tits Fledged This Morning! - HotUKDeals
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Baby Blue Tits Fledged This Morning!

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I know this will not be of interest to everyone, but I just wondered if anyone else had a nestbox in their garden where the baby birds had flown today? We have been keeping an eye on our nestbox since… Read More
busymom Avatar
8y, 1m agoPosted 8 years, 1 month ago
I know this will not be of interest to everyone, but I just wondered if anyone else had a nestbox in their garden where the baby birds had flown today? We have been keeping an eye on our nestbox since the adults started building the nest in April. It was so lovely to stand watching this morning with my 2 and 6 year old while one after one the babies flew out.
busymom Avatar
8y, 1m agoPosted 8 years, 1 month ago
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#1
never had any even nest in mine am gutted :-(
#2
i always look out of my window hoping to see tits but never have done yet:whistling::p
#3
had some starlings they had made a nest in my gutter they have been gone for about 3 weeks now.
#4
ding
i always look out of my window hoping to see tits but never have done yet:whistling::p


lol youre doing it wrong.. you gotta look in windows
#5
kungfu
never had any even nest in mine am gutted :-(


Do you check the nesbox for mites in the autumn? Are there alot of nestbox's in your area? Birds can be a bit picky when choosing a nest so if you make sure its all cleaned out and in a good position then you will get them nesting eventually.
#6
busymom
Do you check the nesbox for mites in the autumn? Are there alot of nestbox's in your area? Birds can be a bit picky when choosing a nest so if you make sure its all cleaned out and in a good position then you will get them nesting eventually.


cheers, its probably too close to the house tbh i gonna move it
#7
I can hear the baby birds at the back of the garden now. As they flew out of the nestbox this morning they were crash landing into the laurel bushes! One of them has managed to climb up to the second branch of my cherry tree and is sitting there waiting to be fed! Just hope they can avoid the cats and magpies.
#8
I think you are lucky if they nest in the box. If you feed birds in the same garden then they will not nest because of the proximity of other birds.
Also if you have trees close by they will probably nest in them as they are probably safer.

Most bird boxes are sited in the wrong place i.e too close to the house and to out in the open.

We had Robins nest in our garage 2 years running and saw about 6 chicks grow but missed them leaving.
#9
greg_68
I think you are lucky if they nest in the box. If you feed birds in the same garden then they will not nest because of the proximity of other birds.
Also if you have trees close by they will probably nest in them as they are probably safer.

Most bird boxes are sited in the wrong place i.e too close to the house and to out in the open.

We had Robins nest in our garage 2 years running and saw about 6 chicks grow but missed them leaving.


I didnt think we would see the babies leave, and it was great to see their little heads pop out looking around! the kids were excited watching too! have you any idea what the recommended distance between box's is? Was thinking about putting another one in the garden in the autumn but wondered how close they could be?
1 Like #10
busymom
I didnt think we would see the babies leave, and it was great to see their little heads pop out looking around! the kids were excited watching too! have you any idea what the recommended distance between box's is? Was thinking about putting another one in the garden in the autumn but wondered how close they could be?


Once you have your nest box you need to decide where to put it. Where you site your nest box will also depend on the type of species it is intended for.

You should try and have your nest box installed by November if you want it to be used the following year - this gives birds time to get used to it before the breeding season - although you can put them up as late as February. However, it may take several years before a new box is used so be patient.

Try and position the box in the shade of buildings or trees. If this is not possible then face the box between north and east so it avoids strong sunlight and the wettest winds.

Make sure that there is a clear flight path into the nest box and the entrance is free from clutter. Tilt the box slightly forwards so that rain will hit the roof and bounce off.

House sparrows and starlings will use nest boxes placed high up under the eaves. You can place two or three of these on the same side of the house as these birds will nest in loose colonies. Make sure they are positioned away from where any house martins usually nest.

Open-fronted boxes for robins or wrens need to be low down and hidden in vegetation. Woodpecker next boxes should be high up on a tree trunk and away from disturbance.

Autumn is the best time to put your nest box up. Many birds will look for a suitable place to roost or feed in autumn and winter.

Don't use nails to fix your nest box to a tree which may damage it. Use a nylon bolt or tie wire around the trunk or branch. Remember that trees grow in girth as well as height so you will need to check the fixing every couple of years.

Although you want to place your nest box out of the reach of predators you still need to provide easy access for humans so that it can be observed and cleaned.

If there is plenty of natural food then two boxes close together may be occupied by the same species if they are at the edge of adjoining territories. While this often happens in the countryside, it is rare in gardens and you will normally only see one nesting pair of any one species. The exceptions to this are sparrows and house martins which nest in colonies. By putting up different boxes you can attract several different species.
#11
greg_68
Once you have your nest box you need to decide where to put it. Where you site your nest box will also depend on the type of species it is intended for.

You should try and have your nest box installed by November if you want it to be used the following year - this gives birds time to get used to it before the breeding season - although you can put them up as late as February. However, it may take several years before a new box is used so be patient.

Try and position the box in the shade of buildings or trees. If this is not possible then face the box between north and east so it avoids strong sunlight and the wettest winds.

Make sure that there is a clear flight path into the nest box and the entrance is free from clutter. Tilt the box slightly forwards so that rain will hit the roof and bounce off.

House sparrows and starlings will use nest boxes placed high up under the eaves. You can place two or three of these on the same side of the house as these birds will nest in loose colonies. Make sure they are positioned away from where any house martins usually nest.

Open-fronted boxes for robins or wrens need to be low down and hidden in vegetation. Woodpecker next boxes should be high up on a tree trunk and away from disturbance.

Autumn is the best time to put your nest box up. Many birds will look for a suitable place to roost or feed in autumn and winter.

Don't use nails to fix your nest box to a tree which may damage it. Use a nylon bolt or tie wire around the trunk or branch. Remember that trees grow in girth as well as height so you will need to check the fixing every couple of years.

Although you want to place your nest box out of the reach of predators you still need to provide easy access for humans so that it can be observed and cleaned.

If there is plenty of natural food then two boxes close together may be occupied by the same species if they are at the edge of adjoining territories. While this often happens in the countryside, it is rare in gardens and you will normally only see one nesting pair of any one species. The exceptions to this are sparrows and house martins which nest in colonies. By putting up different boxes you can attract several different species.


Thanks for all the good info. Think I will look for a different type of nestbox then. Left some rep for you. :)

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