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Best bike for first driver?

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I am looking to get a motorbike, once I complete my CBT training but not sure what bike to go after. I'm not looking to spend much either anything under £1k
levis24 Avatar
5y, 11m agoPosted 5 years, 11 months ago
I am looking to get a motorbike, once I complete my CBT training but not sure what bike to go after.

I'm not looking to spend much either anything under £1k
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levis24 Avatar
5y, 11m agoPosted 5 years, 11 months ago
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#1
Does it need a flux capacitor for your time travel exploits?
banned#2
http://delhi-ncr.metromela.com/image/delhi/shoppig/kids/tricycle.jpg
1 Like #3
Ahhh, the 'online betting legend'...................sorry cant answer your question , but just wanted to say Hi...:p
#4
Would it no be rider instead of driver? lol
#5
For First Bike,
Without a Doubt--
Cheap to Buy, Cheap to Insure, Cheap to Run. Will last forever...

http://i1210.photobucket.com/albums/cc419/kyleg4444/Honda-CG_125-1998.jpg

Edited By: kyleg44 on Apr 24, 2011 17:27
#6
First of all "Best bike for a RIDER"

Edited By: Nassar on Apr 24, 2011 17:26
#7
If you dont want to rush into buying a bike, a lot of CBT training places will loan u a bike and gear for the day whilst they train you.
#8
Yamaha Fazer 600, Honda Hornet or CBR 600
#9
don't buy a 125. I got rid of mine 1 month after I passed and went for a ninja 250 but that was more because I'm so short and lightweight so I agree a Fazer 600 would be a good choice
#10
I thought you ride a bike and drive a car. Subtle but important

Edited By: autolesbona on Apr 24, 2011 17:53
#11
Cant say I would agree with recommending a CBR 600 to a new rider - far too quick and likely to kill himself/herself in no time at all or at best write the bike off. A Fazer would be alot more suitable to learn your skills, but to be honest I would go for a CB 500 or perhaps smaller capacity still.

{... and a sub 1k budget would preclude anything but the oldest of those...}

ChrisUK
Yamaha Fazer 600, Honda Hornet or CBR 600.



Edited By: dt_matthews on Apr 24, 2011 17:56
#12
for a start you don't drive a bike....

my first bike when i passed my test was a honda cbr600.. great bike.

Edited By: souljacker on Apr 24, 2011 18:52
#13
but a Fazer handles differently to a baby blade and encourages a less aggressive style. certainly when rode a cbr600 for a while I found it quite difficult to ride 'conservatively' shall we say.

and I really dont understand how you equate having experience driving a car as making you savvy on a bike. imo, riding a bike and driving really are worlds apart, moreover, if you take most of your habits from driving on to a bike, there's a good chance you'll be an organ donor quite quickly :)

whatsThePoint
As a Fazer uses a R6 engine(even if its detuned) the performance up to 130mph is going to be similar so no its not any worst than a cbr for a beginner
tbh If the op drives a car they will have no problem with any bike size as they already have road sense

dt_matthews
Cant say I would agree with recommending a CBR 600 to a new rider - far too quick and likely to kill himself/herself in no time at all or at best write the bike off. A Fazer would be alot more suitable to learn your skills, but to be honest I would go for a CB 500 or perhaps smaller capacity still.

{... and a sub 1k budget would preclude anything but the oldest of those...}

ChrisUK
Yamaha Fazer 600, Honda Hornet or CBR 600.


#14
chill out dude, and no need to patronise me with your wisdom, i probably couldnt take the weight of your intellect eh? I meant a smaller sibling from the cbr lineage, not literally a 400 baby-blade, so sorry for being so terribly vague.

whatsThePoint
A cbr 600 isn't a baby blade, if your can't get your own facts right i'm not going to waste my time trying trying to explain anything else to you

dt_matthews
but a Fazer handles differently to a baby blade and encourages a less aggressive style. certainly when rode a cbr600 for a while I found it quite difficult to ride 'conservatively' shall we say.

and I really dont understand how you equate having experience driving a car as making you savvy on a bike. imo, riding a bike and driving really are worlds apart, moreover, if you take most of your habits from driving on to a bike, there's a good chance you'll be an organ donor quite quickly :)

whatsThePoint
As a Fazer uses a R6 engine(even if its detuned) the performance up to 130mph is going to be similar so no its not any worst than a cbr for a beginner
tbh If the op drives a car they will have no problem with any bike size as they already have road sense

dt_matthews
Cant say I would agree with recommending a CBR 600 to a new rider - far too quick and likely to kill himself/herself in no time at all or at best write the bike off. A Fazer would be alot more suitable to learn your skills, but to be honest I would go for a CB 500 or perhaps smaller capacity still.

{... and a sub 1k budget would preclude anything but the oldest of those...}

ChrisUK
Yamaha Fazer 600, Honda Hornet or CBR 600.


#15
so is your mentality when riding the same as when you drive?

and why do you seem keen to offend me?

if you cant be civil, I'd rather you didnt try and make mildly insulting conversation at me.

whatsThePoint
cbr600's have been around since around 1990 and they would of been considered softer to ride than the fazer, which would of probably been call aggressive if tested in the early 90's, so the faser is unsuitable by your logic while the cbr is fine
Maybe your on about a cbr600rr hard to tell when your being so vague
If you don't understand having road sense applies to both, i take it you have very little yourself

dt_matthews
chill out dude, and no need to patronise me with your wisdom, i probably couldnt take the weight of your intellect eh? I meant a smaller sibling from the cbr lineage, not literally a 400 baby-blade, so sorry for being so terribly vague.

whatsThePoint
A cbr 600 isn't a baby blade, if your can't get your own facts right i'm not going to waste my time trying trying to explain anything else to you

dt_matthews
but a Fazer handles differently to a baby blade and encourages a less aggressive style. certainly when rode a cbr600 for a while I found it quite difficult to ride 'conservatively' shall we say.

and I really dont understand how you equate having experience driving a car as making you savvy on a bike. imo, riding a bike and driving really are worlds apart, moreover, if you take most of your habits from driving on to a bike, there's a good chance you'll be an organ donor quite quickly :)

whatsThePoint
As a Fazer uses a R6 engine(even if its detuned) the performance up to 130mph is going to be similar so no its not any worst than a cbr for a beginner
tbh If the op drives a car they will have no problem with any bike size as they already have road sense

dt_matthews
Cant say I would agree with recommending a CBR 600 to a new rider - far too quick and likely to kill himself/herself in no time at all or at best write the bike off. A Fazer would be alot more suitable to learn your skills, but to be honest I would go for a CB 500 or perhaps smaller capacity still.

{... and a sub 1k budget would preclude anything but the oldest of those...}

ChrisUK
Yamaha Fazer 600, Honda Hornet or CBR 600.





Edited By: dt_matthews on Apr 24, 2011 20:49
[helper]#16
You want something that isn't too heavy - the Honda CB500 is a good suggestion. Others to think about are Kawasaki ER5, Suzuki GS500e.....or maybe a Diversion 600 but its a bit heavier and is a four cylinder but you can pick them up cheap because the bike mags say they are boring.

Edited By: gari189 on Apr 24, 2011 21:59
#17
dt_matthews
Cant say I would agree with recommending a CBR 600 to a new rider - far too quick and likely to kill himself/herself in no time at all or at best write the bike off. A Fazer would be alot more suitable to learn your skills, but to be honest I would go for a CB 500 or perhaps smaller capacity still.

{... and a sub 1k budget would preclude anything but the oldest of those...}

ChrisUK
Yamaha Fazer 600, Honda Hornet or CBR 600.




All 3 suggestions above are great for first time bikers.

You dont have to ridethem like an idiot just because your new to biking, but they will last you through your transition from novice to experienced rider.

Getting anything lesser & you will ge bored of it & have to upgrade before long.....
1 Like #18
what the hell is everyone thinking recommending you 600cc sports bikes.

I started off on a 125cc when I first did my CBT and oh am I glad to have done that, otherwise I know for sure that I would have recked or seriously damaged a bigger bike while still learning things like leaning round wet roundabouts and changing speed/gear etc.

My advice is to take a 125cc, cheapest possible. Just practice on it, horn your riding skills. after a few months, move up as you please but for goodness sake do not jump on a 600cc.

Plus, if you're doing CBT then you won't be able to (or won't be legally allowed to shall I say) to ride anything over 125cc.

Just to add to the car and bike motorists discussion, I have to agree as a motorcyclist and a car driver - I'm a lot more wary and feel like I know my surroundings a lot more when driving a car, than before I started riding bikes.
#19
Waste of time buying a 125 bike, you'll get bored of it very quickly

I learnt to ride on the tutors supplied 125 bike and as soon as I passed my test bought a Honda cbr 600, very easy bike to adapt to.

People who are saying you'd ne mad to get a big bike straight away don't know what they are talking about, you could just as easily kill yourself on a 125, it doesn't matter about the si3 of the bike, it's the rider at the end of the day
#20
mus_ne
what the hell is everyone thinking recommending you 600cc sports bikes.

I started off on a 125cc when I first did my CBT and oh am I glad to have done that, otherwise I know for sure that I would have recked or seriously damaged a bigger bike while still learning things like leaning round wet roundabouts and changing speed/gear etc.

My advice is to take a 125cc, cheapest possible. Just practice on it, horn your riding skills. after a few months, move up as you please but for goodness sake do not jump on a 600cc.

Plus, if you're doing CBT then you won't be able to (or won't be legally allowed to shall I say) to ride anything over 125cc.

Just to add to the car and bike motorists discussion, I have to agree as a motorcyclist and a car driver - I'm a lot more wary and feel like I know my surroundings a lot more when driving a car, than before I started riding bikes.


i agree, the op could be an inexperienced motorcycle rider , whos never been on a motorcycle in his life, jumping on a 'big' bike could kill him.

when i passed my test i got a 125cc, great bike to start off on, and to build experience up of the road and surroundings.

when i felt i could handle a bigger bike and were ready to get a bigger bike, i then got a zxr 400. which lasted me years.

125s are very cheap to buy,insure and run.

especially when your on a budget of 1K and under...


is the bike for leisure or to travel to work????????






Edited By: kyleg44 on Apr 25, 2011 15:27: .
#21
Why are you even dicussing anything over 125 when he'd have a CBT. Max he can have is 125. Get what the guy said above, a CG125.
#22
Get a hotted up 125 like an Aprillia RS125 maybe, bit more fun, while still meeting the regulations of having just a CBT?
banned#23
looking into this myself, the cbt license is for mopeds and 125cc motorbikes, how would i go about getting bigger cc bikes? Just another test?
#24
There are only 2 different ways of getting a full motorbike license for bigger than 125cc. Car license is irrelevant except for mopeds. Before your practical test you will need to take a motorcycle theory test which you will probably need to organise yourself.

Then the first and best way to full bike license (older than 21) is Direct Access, which means you take your tests (2 modules) on a motorbike which is at least 46.6bhp (training schools provide generally a 500cc bike for you) after which you can ride any size motorbike straight away.

The second is you take your tests on a 125cc and you will be restricted to riding no more than 33 bhp and 0.16kW/kg for 2 years after which you can ride any size bike. This option will probably not work any cheaper and not much cheaper even if you have a 125 you can use.

Expect to pay in the region of £500 for the training and the tests. One thing I have noticed though is that schools will advertise their DA as for instance a 4 day course when in fact it is 2 days training and then a couple of hours out of the other 2 days purely to take you for your test so ask them what they mean when they say 4/5/6 day course.

Edited By: kyleg44 on Apr 25, 2011 17:48
banned#25
kyleg44
There are only 2 different ways of getting a full motorbike license for bigger than 125cc. Car license is irrelevant except for mopeds. Before your practical test you will need to take a motorcycle theory test which you will probably need to organise yourself.

Then the first and best way to full bike license (older than 21) is Direct Access, which means you take your tests (2 modules) on a motorbike which is at least 46.6bhp (training schools provide generally a 500cc bike for you) after which you can ride any size motorbike straight away.

The second is you take your tests on a 125cc and you will be restricted to riding no more than 33 bhp and 0.16kW/kg for 2 years after which you can ride any size bike. This option will probably not work any cheaper and not much cheaper even if you have a 125 you can use.

Expect to pay in the region of £500 for the training and the tests. One thing I have noticed though is that schools will advertise their DA as for instance a 4 day course when in fact it is 2 days training and then a couple of hours out of the other 2 days purely to take you for your test so ask them what they mean when they say 4/5/6 day course.
Thanks for that. great info. Sums it up perfect.
banned#26
also does anyone have the rough estimate of how much it will cost to insure a 125cc motorbike? i know it depends on the bike ect but a rough estimate or past experience would be great.

Thanks.
#27
what bike you going to be insuring
banned#28
kyleg44
what bike you going to be insuring
Don't know I'm still looking into lessons lol, i just wanted a rough estimate on how much
#29
for say a cg 125. group 3-5 insurance , around £170-£450 ish. its next to impossible to say as you have to consider your bike, age, alarm, ..... etc etc

im probably wayout as i got insured years ago

ring as many companies as you can aswell and get online quotes , try Bike insurer..... comparethemarket.......moneysupermarket....





Edited By: kyleg44 on Apr 25, 2011 18:29: ...
#30
As exactly what i thought people are recommending bikes over 125cc lol
#31
Get yourself a cheap honda cg125 or if you can stretch to about £1400 you might be able to pick up a honda cbf 09 with a few miles on, I saw one on ebay go recently for 1500 with only 200 or so miles on the clock. They do 320 miles on a full tank which is like £13 of petty plus they are very forgiving and wont let you down since they are pretty much bulletproof.

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