Blu Ray Vs DVD upscaled!! - HotUKDeals
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Blu Ray Vs DVD upscaled!!

GSD Avatar
8y, 1m agoPosted 8 years, 1 month ago
Dear all smart and clever people!!
This is a genuine query....

There are loads of DVD players which upscale to 1080p.
The best blu ray does is 1080p

So my question is.... wot is the reason to pay more for a blu ray player and blu ray discs, if a dvd upscaler does the same trick with cheaper priced dvds...???
GSD Avatar
8y, 1m agoPosted 8 years, 1 month ago
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Comments/page:
#1
see if you can catch the gadget show from last week.

Tested bluray versus upscaling.
#2
because blue ray is much better.
#3
greg do u no what the outcome was??
#4
black gerbil1
because blue ray is much better.


how much better, from vhs to dvd better or is it just a bit clearer?
#5
resounding blu ray win, not that suprising really I suppose.

They had 2 identical tv's both playing dark knight i think. Didn't let on which was which.

Discussed the picture quality.

All agreed blu ray picture quality far superior.
#6
Lol your taking the base level...... at face value.

1080p don't mean much in the context of DVD upscaling.

i.e. transfer a VHS to DVD - doesn't mean the result will look like your 'average' DVD once upscaled at 1080p.



Still seeing as you've brought it up, my PS3 upscales certain DVD's so well through my Sony Bravia at 1080p - that it's truly hard to tell the difference at times.
#7
Hi robatallica...
thanx
what do u mean 1080p doesnt mean much in the context of dvd upscaling?
does it mean it doesnt look like a 1080p? im confused!
1 Like #8
GSD
Hi robatallica...
thanx
what do u mean 1080p doesnt mean much in the context of dvd upscaling?
does it mean it doesnt look like a 1080p? im confused!


I mean that you can still have a dog-rough DVD upscaled at '1080p' and it will still look rotten.

In essence I meant that a DVD upscaler only serves to improve on a picture - but that means warts 'n all (if that's applicable).

For instance: X-Files..... The early seasons look average upscaled.

Later seasons around 2001/01 look amazing upscaled due to better production techniques by then>>which shows when upscaled.

Also a DVD set called Firelfy I own looks near Blu-ray quality :thumbsup:

1080p is better but it's still rather ambiguous, it can work against you aswell - the odd time serving to accentuate faults.
#9
ahh i c!! thanx for sharin ur brain!!
2 Likes #10
Firefly looks poor on DVD, it's typical of an upscaled DVD in that there's a lot of grain in the underexposed areas of the picture plus it's not a great DVD transfer in the first place. I've been watching it recently and really wishing I had the blu-ray version but I can't justify the high cost right now.

In terms of upscaling the DVD player is generating a 1920x1080 image rather than 720x480(PAL), there's obviously a lot more pixels for the 1080p picture. To generate these extra pixels the DVD player has to guess at what colour the pixel should be by comparing those pixels around it. In some cases this can work quite well such as with animated films, say Miyazaki's Spirited Away - this uses large blocks of solid colour which makes it very easy to upscale the picture as you simply generate the extra pixels the exact same colour as those around it which will look good.

However in films with constant subtle variations such as with a sky, sea or many dark areas then upscaling doesn't work very well. Since there's a constant variation of the different shades the DVD player can't guess the right colour as it's too localised which leaves a grainy effect on the areas with the whole picture looking quite soft. V for Vendetta is the first HD DVD I watched and it's very good at demonstration how much better a native 1080p video is, the film is generally very black with a lot of shadow which looks soft and grainy when upscaled. However the 1080p version is extremely sharp, the dark areas are a proper black and even simple aspects such as the red cross on black for the party emblem just looks pinsharp.

If you're watching a lot of DVDs without any HD material then it's not as noticeable again depending on the film but if you've been watching a lot of HD material it's hard to accept the noticeably lower image quality. One of the best and simplest explanations I've seen of upscaled vs HD is that the latter looks like a layer of grime has been wiped from the screen.

John
banned#11
robtallica
I
For instance: X-Files..... The early seasons look average upscaled.


off subject I know.....but I started watching these a few days ago!! :thumbsup:

Just nearing the end of season one :-D

:thumbsup:
1 Like #12
Here's a link to the Gadget Show Bluray vs DVD upscaling test.
banned#13
Johnmcl7;3765029
Firefly looks poor on DVD, it's typical of an upscaled DVD in that there's a lot of grain in the underexposed areas of the picture plus it's not a great DVD transfer in the first place. I've been watching it recently and really wishing I had the blu-ray version but I can't justify the high cost right now.

In terms of upscaling the DVD player is generating a 1920x1080 image rather than 720x480(PAL), there's obviously a lot more pixels for the 1080p picture. To generate these extra pixels the DVD player has to guess at what colour the pixel should be by comparing those pixels around it. In some cases this can work quite well such as with animated films, say Miyazaki's Spirited Away - this uses large blocks of solid colour which makes it very easy to upscale the picture as you simply generate the extra pixels the exact same colour as those around it which will look good.

However in films with constant subtle variations such as with a sky, sea or many dark areas then upscaling doesn't work very well. Since there's a constant variation of the different shades the DVD player can't guess the right colour as it's too localised which leaves a grainy effect on the areas with the whole picture looking quite soft. V for Vendetta is the first HD DVD I watched and it's very good at demonstration how much better a native 1080p video is, the film is generally very black with a lot of shadow which looks soft and grainy when upscaled. However the 1080p version is extremely sharp, the dark areas are a proper black and even simple aspects such as the red cross on black for the party emblem just looks pinsharp.

If you're watching a lot of DVDs without any HD material then it's not as noticeable again depending on the film but if you've been watching a lot of HD material it's hard to accept the noticeably lower image quality. One of the best and simplest explanations I've seen of upscaled vs HD is that the latter looks like a layer of grime has been wiped from the screen.

John

brill explanation :thumbsup:
#14
thanks johnmcl.... clear as hd now!! haha
#15
I bought a home cinema system last week, which upscales to 1080p... the newer films look alright, what i think it does is basically guess the pixels at higher resolution to give you a clearer picture. However upscaling only really works well on newer movies such as die hard 4 and transformers because these films have much better produced. Older movies you wont notice that much of a difference.

Blu ray however simply wipes the floor with upscaled dvds, there is a big difference. DVD upscaled quality is good but its absolutely nothing compared to what you get out of a blu ray disk.
#16
You do realiase that if you are watching a standard dvd on an HD TV then you are already seeing an upscaled image. The TV will upscale the video for you. To explain a little a dvd has a resolution of 480p if this wasnt upscaled by your HD tv you would only get a small picture in the middle of the screen. The tv upscales it to fill the entire screen. upscaling DVD players do nothing your tv doesnt already do (although some will do it better).
#17
Blu ray discs have a capacity of 30gb at the moment as dvd has 4.7 on average therefore the quality of the bluray is so much better has the storage is able to have better resolution and sound quality. think of it as a compressed sound file at 2mb and one at 6mb the 6mb file is going to have much better quality.
#18
Johnmcl7
Firefly looks poor on DVD, it's typical of an upscaled DVD in that there's a lot of grain in the underexposed areas of the picture plus it's not a great DVD transfer in the first place. I've been watching it recently and really wishing I had the blu-ray version but I can't justify the high cost right now.

In terms of upscaling the DVD player is generating a 1920x1080 image rather than 720x480(PAL), there's obviously a lot more pixels for the 1080p picture. To generate these extra pixels the DVD player has to guess at what colour the pixel should be by comparing those pixels around it. In some cases this can work quite well such as with animated films, say Miyazaki's Spirited Away - this uses large blocks of solid colour which makes it very easy to upscale the picture as you simply generate the extra pixels the exact same colour as those around it which will look good.

However in films with constant subtle variations such as with a sky, sea or many dark areas then upscaling doesn't work very well. Since there's a constant variation of the different shades the DVD player can't guess the right colour as it's too localised which leaves a grainy effect on the areas with the whole picture looking quite soft. V for Vendetta is the first HD DVD I watched and it's very good at demonstration how much better a native 1080p video is, the film is generally very black with a lot of shadow which looks soft and grainy when upscaled. However the 1080p version is extremely sharp, the dark areas are a proper black and even simple aspects such as the red cross on black for the party emblem just looks pinsharp.

If you're watching a lot of DVDs without any HD material then it's not as noticeable again depending on the film but if you've been watching a lot of HD material it's hard to accept the noticeably lower image quality. One of the best and simplest explanations I've seen of upscaled vs HD is that the latter looks like a layer of grime has been wiped from the screen.

John


This is the best explanation I've read of this issue, great post - repped.
#19
DVD Upscalers have magic pixies in them that fill in the pixels to make it look better.

Blu Ray has tons of space on the disc so is able to store and therefore show a higher quality of picture.

If you were to walk towards two 1080p TV's showing each type you would notice the graininess on the upscaler first and in some cases almost have your nose pressed against the screen on the BR before the picture deteriorated.

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