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Brexit 2 - Its scone as in ‘gone’ not scone as in ‘bone’

£0.00 @ ITS
Yet again the country is divided https://yougov.co.uk/news/2016/10/31/its-scone-gone-not-scone-bone/
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banned3m, 2w agoPosted 3 months, 2 weeks ago
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banned3m, 2w agoPosted 3 months, 2 weeks ago
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banned 2 Likes #1
Scone as in bone has my vote.

Cream then jam, or jam the cream?

http://www.takeheart.net/pix%202010/sconeandcream.jpg

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/sites/default/files/styles/recipe/public/recipe_images/recipe-image-legacy-id--1001500_10.jpg?itok=fEr-egEu







Edited By: cchopps on Nov 04, 2016 04:45: MSK happiness
4 Likes #2
the north is correct its scone as in gone
2 Likes #3
I prefer crumpet ;)

in b4 all the other pervs
4 Likes #4
cchopps
Scone as in bone has my vote.
Cream then jam, or jam the cream?http://www.takeheart.net/pix%202010/sconeandcream.jpghttp://oldfernvalebakery.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/jam-cream-scones.jpg

Cream then jam. Don't be a heathen. Why is the other picture so big? It's very upsetting.
3 Likes #5
P.S if it's piped it's definitely not clotted cream. That's even more offensive than the order of toppings.
banned 1 Like #6
moneysavingkitten
cchopps
Scone as in bone has my vote.
Cream then jam, or jam the cream?http://www.takeheart.net/pix%202010/sconeandcream.jpghttp://oldfernvalebakery.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/jam-cream-scones.jpg
Cream then jam. Don't be a heathen. Why is the other picture so big? It's very upsetting.

Moi, a heathen! Fixed for you, and I totally agree.

Edited By: cchopps on Nov 04, 2016 04:49
3 Likes #7
cchopps
moneysavingkitten
cchopps
Scone as in bone has my vote.
Cream then jam, or jam the cream?http://www.takeheart.net/pix%202010/sconeandcream.jpghttp://oldfernvalebakery.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/jam-cream-scones.jpg
Cream then jam. Don't be a heathen. Why is the other picture so big? It's very upsetting.
Moi, a heathen! Fixed for you, and I totally agree.

I take it back. You're a classy person with great taste :)
banned 4 Likes #8
moneysavingkitten
cchopps
moneysavingkitten
cchopps
Scone as in bone has my vote.
Cream then jam, or jam the cream?http://www.takeheart.net/pix%202010/sconeandcream.jpghttp://oldfernvalebakery.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/jam-cream-scones.jpg
Cream then jam. Don't be a heathen. Why is the other picture so big? It's very upsetting.
Moi, a heathen! Fixed for you, and I totally agree.
I take it back. You're a classy person with great taste :)

http://i.imgur.com/qrFdkUa.gif
2 Likes #9
miles136
the north is correct its scone as in gone

I am absconding (but Northerners are always correct).

Oh..., that's confusing & could lead to laughter.

Unless I prefix laughter with an "s"... that could lead to slaughter.

Stupid English.

philphil61
I prefer crumpet ;)
in b4 all the other pervs

Sloppy seconds?

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-QFG9Zq2eq74/VQOuR1YjMzI/AAAAAAAAfPc/DjauPJ2oo2o/s1600/tea-time-cat.jpg

(Other girl-guiding/scouting groups are available)
#10
Does this mean the Stone of Scone(bone) is really the Stone of Scone(gone)?
#11
Its scone as in ‘gone’ not scone as in ‘bone’
It really doesn't matter

If you did say
scone as in ‘bone’
however I would think you were a right posh twerp
banned 2 Likes #12
thewongwing101
Its scone as in ‘gone’ not scone as in ‘bone’
It really doesn't matter
If you did say
scone as in ‘bone’
however I would think you were a right posh twerp

Good morning
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_VugOxrdbhbI/TUfzQxTuIwI/AAAAAAAAAFI/P2JY2-__HCI/s1600/drinking_coffee.png
1 Like #13
cchopps
thewongwing101
Its scone as in ‘gone’ not scone as in ‘bone’
It really doesn't matter
If you did say
scone as in ‘bone’
however I would think you were a right posh twerp
Good morninghttp://3.bp.blogspot.com/_VugOxrdbhbI/TUfzQxTuIwI/AAAAAAAAAFI/P2JY2-__HCI/s1600/drinking_coffee.png
Morning breakfast time to early for cheese scones yet :D
http://img2.thejournal.ie/inline/2100030/original/?width=630&version=2100030
Did anyone else find the website 'frozen' there ?
#14
I am from London, I say sc'gone
#15
miles136
the north is correct its scone as in gone
Always been s-gone to me, and I'm a Southener! ;)
#16
I get the Gone for Scone,but a little confused how Bone even sounds a little like Scone :-/
1 Like #17
so if its scone as in gone, should cone be con?
1 Like #18
WheresMeNuts
I get the Gone for Scone,but a little confused how Bone even sounds a little like Scone :-/
or cone,phone,moan,roam......
suspended#19
I think I actually use both interchangeably. Honestly it's really a matter of no great importance....

not like pronouncing Bath as 'barth'. X)
#20
Scone (Gone) is the posh way, I've heard posh people say that
#21
And the cheesy versions are the best. Warm with loads of melting butter. :p
2 Likes #22
Scone - Bone for me
1 Like #23
limpduck
so if its scone as in gone, should cone be con?
^^ this.

Scone rhymes with bone, phone and drone.

Let's take the final "e" off all those words. Scon, bon, phon, dron. Sound changes, but each of the four words still rhyme.
#24
miles136
the north is correct
Northern accents are what they are - accents. They are not standard English.
2 Likes #25
cchopps
Scone as in bone has my vote.
Cream then jam, or jam the cream?http://www.takeheart.net/pix%202010/sconeandcream.jpghttp://www.bbcgoodfood.com/sites/default/files/styles/recipe/public/recipe_images/recipe-image-legacy-id--1001500_10.jpg?itok=fEr-egEu
you are one sick puppy, its scone as in gone
jam/cream depends on their relative viscosity - thickest on bottom
#26
its all down to the north / south accent
what about
grass as in ar5e
or
grass as in ass??
1 Like #27
SidSnot
Does this mean the Stone of Scone(bone) is really the Stone of Scone(gone)?

That particular Stone is neither bone not gone. It's /ˈskuːn/; Scottish Gaelic: An Lia Fàil, Scots: Stane o Scuin.

'Skoon' for those that weren't taught their history correctly.
#28
I come from dannn sarf but went up norf once so I'm happy to use either scone (gone) or scone (bone). Whichever pronunciation gets me the goodies (_;)
#29
amis1975
its all down to the north / south accent
what about
grass as in ar5e
or
grass as in ass??

Not as simple as that, the map about half way down the page in the link below shows South Yorkshire and Manchester go for stone-bone, further north it's stone-gone

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/food-and-drink/news/survey-reveals-correct-way-to-pronounce-scone/
#30
WheresMeNuts
I get the Gone for Scone,but a little confused how Bone even sounds a little like Scone :-/

Bone sounds like scone when pronounced like ice cream cone.
#31
chuckiedoll
miles136
the north is correct its scone as in gone
Always been s-gone to me, and I'm a Southener! ;)
And me. Never heard anyone call it anything else
#32
fanpages
WheresMeNuts
I get the Gone for Scone,but a little confused how Bone even sounds a little like Scone :-/
Bone sounds like scone when pronounced like ice cream cone.
Nah, I'm not having that :D
1 Like #33
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
I think I actually use both interchangeably. Honestly it's really a matter of no great importance....
not like pronouncing Bath as 'barth'. X)

The long 'a' variant ("bah-th"), unfortunately, is correct.
Just like when Northerners change the long 'a' in Master ("Mar-ster") to a short 'a' ("Mass-ter").

Other examples (from many more):
Ask, Blast, Cast, Graph, Grass, Plaster, Raft, Vast, & **** (<- an illegitimate child).
#34
I used to live in Scone in Perthshire, pron. as in 'goon'

Also is 'Scone' as in 'Gone', and its Jam first then cream, otherwise how would the jam adhere? it would slide off the cream

Edited By: haritori on Nov 04, 2016 13:26
1 Like #35
fanpages
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
I think I actually use both interchangeably. Honestly it's really a matter of no great importance....
not like pronouncing Bath as 'barth'. X)
The long 'a' variant ("bah-th"), unfortunately, is correct.
Just like when Northerners change the long 'a' in Master ("Mar-ster") to a short 'a' ("Mass-ter").
Other examples (from many more):
Ask, Blast, Cast, Graph, Grass, Plaster, Raft, Vast, & **** (<- an illegitimate child).

Going back 2-300 years ago the short A sound was the standard pronunciation across the board. The long A originated in the late 18th century as a purely London pronunciation and slowly spread from there across Southern England.

As the short A pronunciation has been around longer and has always been used by the majority of native English speakers I'd say that's correct and it's southerners who are doing it wrong. :p
#36
haritori
I used to live in Scone in Perthshire, pron. as in 'goon'
Also is 'Scone' as in 'Gone', and its Jam first then cream, otherwise how would the jam adhere? it would slide off the cream

[ http://www.torquayheraldexpress.co.uk/science-proves-devon-wins-centuries-old-cream-tea/story-27700233-detail/story.html ]
---
It's cream on first - and that's official! Devon's cream on scone before the jam style has been scientifically proven to be better than the Cornish jam first, cream on top version...
---

[ https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/poll/2010/may/20/cream-tea-scone-clotted-cream ]
---
Which county's method is correct?

57% Cornwall - jam first and clotted cream on top
43% Devon - cream first with jam on top
---
#37
HotEnglishAndWelshDeals
I think I actually use both interchangeably. Honestly it's really a matter of no great importance....
not like pronouncing Bath as 'barth'. X)
fanpages
The long 'a' variant ("bah-th"), unfortunately, is correct.

Just like when Northerners change the long 'a' in Master ("Mar-ster") to a short 'a' ("Mass-ter").

Other examples (from many more):
Ask, Blast, Cast, Graph, Grass, Plaster, Raft, Vast, & **** (<- an illegitimate child).
spoo
Going back 2-300 years ago the short A sound was the standard pronunciation across the board. The long A originated in the late 18th century as a purely London pronunciation and slowly spread from there across Southern England.

As the short A pronunciation has been around longer and has always been used by the majority of native English speakers I'd say that's correct and it's southerners who are doing it wrong. :p

As I said earlier in the thread...

fanpages
I am absconding (but Northerners are always correct)...
1 Like #38
haritori
I used to live in Scone in Perthshire, pron. as in 'goon'
Also is 'Scone' as in 'Gone', and its Jam first then cream, otherwise how would the jam adhere? it would slide off the cream

Do you put jam then butter on your toast? :|
1 Like #39
Scone as in bone
Grass as in ar$e
Bath as in Barth
:{
1 Like #40
cchopps
thewongwing101
Its scone as in ‘gone’ not scone as in ‘bone’
It really doesn't matter
If you did say
scone as in ‘bone’
however I would think you were a right posh twerp
Good morninghttp://3.bp.blogspot.com/_VugOxrdbhbI/TUfzQxTuIwI/AAAAAAAAAFI/P2JY2-__HCI/s1600/drinking_coffee.png
Very sorry about that
you would still get a bit of a funny look if you offered me a scone rather than a scone
still say thank you very much mind X)

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