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Can Someone criticize my Cv Please

whelan189 Avatar
2y, 4m agoPosted 2 years, 4 months ago
Hello Guys need to write up a cv again as lost my old one, going to get a new job as need more hours and change of field after studies will finish next year, would really appreciate some help on how to improve and also, if some can amend the section of experience cannot get it to line up correctly, (your see what i mean)

thanks
http://speedy.sh/dH38w/help.doc
whelan189 Avatar
2y, 4m agoPosted 2 years, 4 months ago
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Comments/page:
#1
I do hope that your CV doesn't include basic English.
#2
Inactive
I do hope that your CV doesn't include basic English.

thanks for help
#3
[quote=whatsThePoint]you should write a different cv for each job you apply for, tailoring it to show you have what the company is looking for[/quote

to be honest i will be looking at hospitality only anyway so only will need 1?
#4
I guess you mean shadowing rather than shading.

Your current job should be represented more positively rather than being made to sound like a stop gap and a way to gain "extra cash" even if it is.

You need to rewrite the part about football, as the grammar is very bad... in fact pretty much all of the hobbies and interests needs looking at again.

Spent or spend
need or needed

I get the feeling that your hobbies and interests were rushed compared to the rest.
#5
whatsThePoint
you should write a different cv for each job you apply for, tailoring it to show you have what the company is looking for

That's what a cover letter is for...
#6
Type your answer here..thankyou will look at that again and ammend:)
#7
whelan189
Type your answer here..thankyou will look at that again and ammend:)



I hope that you mean " amend " with one m.

Get a spell checker.
#8
Inactive
whelan189
Type your answer here..thankyou will look at that again and ammend:)


I hope that you mean " amend " with one m.

Get a spell checker.

Bully
1 Like #9
From the point of view of an experienced manager responsible for recruitment (IT and Retail), here is what I can tell you.

The blunt but honest truth is that I wouldn't have got to the end of the CV. Your CV would have been filed in the bin before I got to the second page. Hopefully though, I can explain why and point you in the right direction for improving it.

Initially - I am going to pick up on the spelling and grammar issue, as has already been mentioned. This is a small issue on its own, but it is significantly amplified by your profile. You have written the following phrases in your profile:
keen eye for detail -- my diligence and enthusiasm

Neither of those show through in your CV. That isn't to say that you don't possess those attributes, but simply you don't show them within the document. There are three things that you generally get to show to a prospective employer. Your CV, the cover letter and the envelope it comes in. If your CV states you have a keen eye for detail, I want to see it within the presentation of your CV, cover letter and the envelope. Otherwise it will be counted against you. The same applies for enthusiasm. If I can't see your enthusiasm within your CV, it will count against you.

Therefore - by all means keep those phrases, but execute their meaning within the content of what you send to prospective employers.
1. Hand write the envelope in neat and clear hand writing. (Hand written envelopes are always opened before printed ones by the vast majority of mail receivers/assistants.)
2. Hand write the cover letter, unless your hand writing is really bad. (A typed and printed cover letter may look more official, but a hand written one shows that you have spent time and effort writing to that individual company.)
3. Go through your documents with a fine tooth comb. Give it to someone else to go through with a fine tooth comb. Do it again yourself. Rinse, and repeat.
4. None of us mere mortals have perfect grammar (within my own response, I have already seen plenty of mistakes on a re-read) - so cheat! Use a service with British grammar to check your documents. Take out a free trial with Grammarly and put your documents through it. Correct the problems.

Presentation
You have stated that you are looking for work within the hospitality industry. A key area of hospitality is presentation, and potential employers are going to want to see that within the documents that you send them. Given that your CV is a .doc file, I have to allow for the possibility that certain layout errors may be because of the conversion to open it in LibreOffice. However, the overall design of the CV is quite stale and tiresome.

The HR team/recruitment manager is going to see plenty of requests for work. There are two things that they want more than anything. Something that looks interesting, and something that is easy to read.

You have indented progressively (a waste of space, and quite difficult to read), but also inconsistently. Everything must maintain a consistent approach through your documentation. Do not be afraid to use lines to define areas rather than spaces. Don't (whatever else you do) use a template. The layout and style needs to come from you, not the same person that has been responsible for hundreds of thousands of CVs over the years.

You have stated that you have experience in illustration and the use of Powerpoint, so show it. That doesn't mean you should turn your CV into a story board. However, Powerpoint is about presentation of information in an easy to convey manner. Bring your document to life with some subtle style. Take pride in what you are presenting, this is not a simple list of what you have done. It is the dining hall, the reception lobby, and the honeymoon suite all rolled into one. You would not present those in a drab and dull manner, would you?

You offer a brief explanation of your computer literacy. The ability to 'use' Word, Excel, Powerpoint and Access is ten a penny. What you need to do is give a reason for those skills to be there. Are you experienced in using Access, or are you experienced in creating and maintaining relational databases? (Top tip - do yourself a favour and practice using VBA. Virtually everyone can open a spreadsheet or database and input data. Being able to create an active spreadsheet or database that has back end scripting can be a huge selling point to an employer).

You state your competence in illustration, programming, and web design. (Point of interest - learn about and use the "Oxford Comma"). Stipulate the language(s) that you can program in, and the web technologies that you are competent in. Don't bluff these, but realise the person doing the recruiting is unlikely to have much insight into these, so make use of relevant keywords. All the buzz at the moment surrounds HTML5 & CSS3. If you can work with those, don't just put HTML and CSS. Use the descriptions that are becoming buzz words in the media, because that is how many recruiters will decide if you have what they want.

Fast typing - give an average Words Per Minute rate. If you touch type, include that detail. If you do not - get on a course and learn, you will thank yourself in the future.
Creative - again, show this in your CV.

Work Experience
Within a given industry, recruiters tend to understand what a job entails. You were a waiter, fine. But don't insult your potential employer by explaining to them the job role of a waiter. After all, in your case, the potential employer is likely to employ plenty waiters. What a recruiter wants to see is what you achieved, not what you did. You learnt new skills, so briefly explain how these improved your ability to work at that establishment and how it will benefit your next employer. Link the skills and achievements to the employer that you are sending the CV to. Use bullet points rather than a paragraph. As "WhatsThePoint" stated, your CV absolutely must be tailored to each individual recipient. If you can photocopy your CV and send it to two different employers, it is a bad CV.

In your hobbies and interests, you state that you have learnt life skills with "Young Enterprise", but you fail to mention what this specific skills are. A potential employer does not want to see a generic "I have skills in business and advertising", they want to see specific skills that are applicable to their needs.

Your potential employer may be interested in your desire to obtain a driving license. However, they do not want to hear your life story. There is no interest whatsoever in why you became a cyclist, only what you use it for and what benefit it will be. You cycle for enjoyment, fitness, and as a responsible mode of transport. Now consider what benefit this is to your next employer. Do you cycle in the local area whilst working at a hotel retreat? Could this enable you to offer sound advice on beautiful, yet generally unknown cycle trails or footpaths that guests would like to visit. Things that they are not going to see in the tourist guides?

The next one needs to be taken in the manner in which I mean it. I have the utmost respect for the fact that an injury has prevented you from seeking a career as a professional footballer, so please understand that what I say now should not be taken as a slight against the situation that arose and how it affected you.

You have stated that an injury took the prospect of a career in football out of your hands. This presents a defeatist attitude. It is not that a recruiter will look at that and think that you should have carried on with an injury. It is that you have taken the negative aspect (an injury has ruined your opportunity to seek a career as a professional footballer), and settled for it. You will have developed a knowledge of the sport that can still be put to great use. It may be clichéd, but you could take that experience and put it into practical use as a coach of a local youth team. A recruiter wants to see that when the cards are down, and you realise you have nothing left in your hands - you can still pick yourself up, and use what you have learned.

Bobbajob mentioned that your "Hobbies and Interests" section looked rushed. And this is absolutely correct. Hobbies and interests are supposed to be things that you are passionate about. Show that passion within what you write. If you can not show effort in things that you do for no other reason than the fact you enjoy them, a recruiter will doubt your ability to show even a passing interest in what they need you to do within your job role.

Don't bother with the Referees section. Do not even bother putting "References available on request". That is a given, you are just wasting space on your CV putting them there. An employer will not be interested in contacting your references unless they are preparing to give you a job, certainly it will never be before at least one interview. So keep your references printed on a separate document which you can give to the potential employer on demand (which means have them with you at an interview, but don't offer them - wait for them to be requested).

And finally. Your name, address, e-mail, and telephone number should be in the footer of every additional page after the first one. This way, if for any reason the pages become separated, you can still be contacted.

Best of luck with the job search, and best of luck with composing your CV.
#10
whatsThePoint
it would of been quicker to just write the op a new cv :|

It would also have been a completely pointless exercise as it would fall foul of the same problem that templates give. It would have been my CV with the OP's details. There is nothing personal about that at all. Now the OP has the opportunity to understand what changes are necessary and continue to write effective CVs in the future. Potentially, other people who may be in a similar situation will also be able to benefit. That makes it entirely worth the effort.

Work Once, Rewards Multiple.
#11
whelan189
Inactive
whelan189
Type your answer here..thankyou will look at that again and ammend:)



I hope that you mean " amend " with one m.

Get a spell checker.


Bully


It was only intended as constructive criticism.
#12
I am organised, reliable and hard working, with a keen eye for detail. My self-motivation and initiative, along with my diligence and enthusiasm, allow me to work equally well independently or as part of a team.

According to who?? Not worth the paper it's written on. Probably lifted off a website using copy and paste by someone who doesn't know what diligence means.

No DoB or age? Am I dealing with a 40 year old who took their GCSEs late here?


Skills:
Fast typing - include WPM or any official scores you may have
Highly Numerate and literate - really???? Reading the second page of the CV shows me you're clearly lying. For this reason, I can't trust any of your skills and will take everything you say with a pinch of salt.
Creative - evidence??

Is everyone who reads this CV expected to know what The Amsterdam is? It could either be an exclusive and respected eatery or a crap roadside cafe. And as you only have 2 months of experience in your field, you really need to pad these out, focusing on the relevant skills you learnt.

Football - this isn't Britain's Got Talent where a sob story will win you the love of the moronic audience.
Are you aware of what Young Enterprise is? It's an organisation that has nothing to do with spending spare time with computers.
Cycling - what the what??? If I hadn't by this point, I would bin this CV as it's insulting that you even think that's a sentence. You claimed before to be highly literate. Does a prospective employer in the hospitality industry care about your casual thoughts on the living wage and modes of transport? No!!! Stop wasting everyone's time and sort that out.

Most job vacancies attract many CVs and the best presented ones will usually succeed. Yes, laying out of CVs is not central to waitressing, and that is unfair, but no employer is going to take a punt of someone with a poor CV. Most won't even get to the end of any but the best CVs so you've got to prioritise the key and relevant info e.g. put the experience on the front page.
#13
DennisG
I am organised, reliable and hard working, with a keen eye for detail. My self-motivation and initiative, along with my diligence and enthusiasm, allow me to work equally well independently or as part of a team.

According to who?? Not worth the paper it's written on. Probably lifted off a website using copy and paste by someone who doesn't know what diligence means.

No DoB or age? Am I dealing with a 40 year old who took their GCSEs late here?


Skills:
Fast typing - include WPM or any official scores you may have
Highly Numerate and literate - really???? Reading the second page of the CV shows me you're clearly lying. For this reason, I can't trust any of your skills and will take everything you say with a pinch of salt.
Creative - evidence??

Is everyone who reads this CV expected to know what The Amsterdam is? It could either be an exclusive and respected eatery or a crap roadside cafe. And as you only have 2 months of experience in your field, you really need to pad these out, focusing on the relevant skills you learnt.

Football - this isn't Britain's Got Talent where a sob story will win you the love of the moronic audience.
Are you aware of what Young Enterprise is? It's an organisation that has nothing to do with spending spare time with computers.
Cycling - what the what??? If I hadn't by this point, I would bin this CV as it's insulting that you even think that's a sentence. You claimed before to be highly literate. Does a prospective employer in the hospitality industry care about your casual thoughts on the living wage and modes of transport? No!!! Stop wasting everyone's time and sort that out.

Most job vacancies attract many CVs and the best presented ones will usually succeed. Yes, laying out of CVs is not central to waitressing, and that is unfair, but no employer is going to take a punt of someone with a poor CV. Most won't even get to the end of any but the best CVs so you've got to prioritise the key and relevant info e.g. put the experience on the front page.

There is a vast difference between being bluntly critical and being obnoxious, and rude. You are definitely the latter. Whether you meant to come across as an arrogant egotist is another matter, but that is certainly how you have presented yourself.
#14
It was written from the point of view of a frustrated manager who receives plenty of badly written CVs.
A lot of people who have to review CVs have little patience for those that have bad grammar and are poorly constructed.
Why sugar coat it for the OP?
Few in the real world will take time out to give constructive criticism, but many will share some of these thoughts as they file this CV in the bin.
And I don't think there's anything obnoxious or rude in there.
#15
DennisG
It was written from the point of view of a frustrated manager who receives plenty of badly written CVs.
A lot of people who have to review CVs have little patience for those that have bad grammar and are poorly constructed.
Why sugar coat it for the OP?
Few in the real world will take time out to give constructive criticism, but many will share some of these thoughts as they file this CV in the bin.
And I don't think there's anything obnoxious or rude in there.

I did think you were being obnoxious, but thats just my opinion.
#16
I feel really greatful for all the help from some of the members, I feel some people get a kick putting my down because my english is not the best, but neither is most kids my age, so back off.. most of you slating me are mid 30s, what do you expect?

thanks dlee1 and other that have helped I am going to set aside time to read through it bit by bit and change my cv:)

Also, when im on forums and online i do not care about my spelling as i prefer to do it quickly and get on with life
[mod][Mod Team]#17
DennisG
No DoB or age? Am I dealing with a 40 year old who took their GCSEs late here?

That would be ageism. Age is now a protected characteristic of the Equality Act, but as a Manager who reviews lots of CVs, I'd imagine you already knew that?
#18
I am a professional recruiter and the advice by dlee above is golden, spot on and very kind of him to share it.

Point on age: the law says you don't have to share it (more: they aren't allowed to consider it, although the reality is that most do) but if you are young id say do put it down as it will likely work in your favour, particularly in the hospitality sector.
#19
whelan189
I feel really greatful for all the help from some of the members, I feel some people get a kick putting my down because my english is not the best, but neither is most kids my age, so back off.. most of you slating me are mid 30s, what do you expect?

thanks dlee1 and other that have helped I am going to set aside time to read through it bit by bit and change my cv:)

Also, when I'm on forums and online i do not care about my spelling as i prefer to do it quickly and get on with life

unless you are under the age of 11 and English inst your first language or you have a learning disability, that is highly insulting to other people your age, to assume "most kids" are the same when there are lots including me who don't fit in to that category (in fact I know many a foreign transfer student who speaks better English that many native speakers)

your language and comprehension skills are the outcome of the work You put in to it during your time in school and beyond.
Dont tar everyone else the same as your self, they deserve better than that.



Edited By: mrwhitelabel on Jul 28, 2014 22:34: edit
#20
If I visited a hotel as a guest then my interest would be the quality of the service provided by the staff and not their written English ability! The reality in today's hotel sector either from the point of view of employer or hotel guest is that most employees are immigrants.

Unless it's a management level position at that hotel or something that needed excellent English my guess would be that excellent written English wouldn't be one of the qualifying criteria.

If indeed the OP is applying for a positron in the hospitality sector then the CV should stress the verbal communicating abilities and ability to work shifts and anti social hours.

I wouldn't mention being unable to drive especially if one lived far away from the proposed work site. As that would stands against you.

I am not am employer but any half decent recruiter will recruit people that enriches the business. So they would be looking for things that will benefit them in that line of work. Just some personal thoughts of mine that hopefully might help the OP.

Pay a scouting visit to the employer before applying and talk to the people who matter to see if it's the job for you! Ask if you can spend a day unpaid to shadow then at work to see if you suit their needs and if it suits you, this should be done before applying for the job.

In my experience it gives them a better picture of you to them. Even if you don't get the job, stick around for advice and tips and to express your disappointment. Sometimes extra jobs are created on the spot for such people.

Yes spend time on your CV. But don't forget the pre application or post application familiarisation visit. Do not visit without making a formal request for such a visit as they will get annoyed if you interrupt at a busy time.

Beat of luck.
#21
Typos ... because am typing on my phone and can't be arsed to edit from my phone. Sorry. Just mentioning before the spelling and grammar police get in on the act.
#22
dlee1
From the point of view of an experienced manager responsible for recruitment (IT and Retail), here is what I can tell you.

The blunt but honest truth is that I wouldn't have got to the end of the CV. Your CV would have been filed in the bin before I got to the second page. Hopefully though, I can explain why and point you in the right direction for improving it.

Initially - I am going to pick up on the spelling and grammar issue, as has already been mentioned. This is a small issue on its own, but it is significantly amplified by your profile. You have written the following phrases in your profile:
keen eye for detail -- my diligence and enthusiasm

Neither of those show through in your CV. That isn't to say that you don't possess those attributes, but simply you don't show them within the document. There are three things that you generally get to show to a prospective employer. Your CV, the cover letter and the envelope it comes in. If your CV states you have a keen eye for detail, I want to see it within the presentation of your CV, cover letter and the envelope. Otherwise it will be counted against you. The same applies for enthusiasm. If I can't see your enthusiasm within your CV, it will count against you.

Therefore - by all means keep those phrases, but execute their meaning within the content of what you send to prospective employers.
1. Hand write the envelope in neat and clear hand writing. (Hand written envelopes are always opened before printed ones by the vast majority of mail receivers/assistants.)
2. Hand write the cover letter, unless your hand writing is really bad. (A typed and printed cover letter may look more official, but a hand written one shows that you have spent time and effort writing to that individual company.)
3. Go through your documents with a fine tooth comb. Give it to someone else to go through with a fine tooth comb. Do it again yourself. Rinse, and repeat.
4. None of us mere mortals have perfect grammar (within my own response, I have already seen plenty of mistakes on a re-read) - so cheat! Use a service with British grammar to check your documents. Take out a free trial with Grammarly and put your documents through it. Correct the problems.

Presentation
You have stated that you are looking for work within the hospitality industry. A key area of hospitality is presentation, and potential employers are going to want to see that within the documents that you send them. Given that your CV is a .doc file, I have to allow for the possibility that certain layout errors may be because of the conversion to open it in LibreOffice. However, the overall design of the CV is quite stale and tiresome.

The HR team/recruitment manager is going to see plenty of requests for work. There are two things that they want more than anything. Something that looks interesting, and something that is easy to read.

You have indented progressively (a waste of space, and quite difficult to read), but also inconsistently. Everything must maintain a consistent approach through your documentation. Do not be afraid to use lines to define areas rather than spaces. Don't (whatever else you do) use a template. The layout and style needs to come from you, not the same person that has been responsible for hundreds of thousands of CVs over the years.

You have stated that you have experience in illustration and the use of Powerpoint, so show it. That doesn't mean you should turn your CV into a story board. However, Powerpoint is about presentation of information in an easy to convey manner. Bring your document to life with some subtle style. Take pride in what you are presenting, this is not a simple list of what you have done. It is the dining hall, the reception lobby, and the honeymoon suite all rolled into one. You would not present those in a drab and dull manner, would you?

You offer a brief explanation of your computer literacy. The ability to 'use' Word, Excel, Powerpoint and Access is ten a penny. What you need to do is give a reason for those skills to be there. Are you experienced in using Access, or are you experienced in creating and maintaining relational databases? (Top tip - do yourself a favour and practice using VBA. Virtually everyone can open a spreadsheet or database and input data. Being able to create an active spreadsheet or database that has back end scripting can be a huge selling point to an employer).

You state your competence in illustration, programming, and web design. (Point of interest - learn about and use the "Oxford Comma"). Stipulate the language(s) that you can program in, and the web technologies that you are competent in. Don't bluff these, but realise the person doing the recruiting is unlikely to have much insight into these, so make use of relevant keywords. All the buzz at the moment surrounds HTML5 & CSS3. If you can work with those, don't just put HTML and CSS. Use the descriptions that are becoming buzz words in the media, because that is how many recruiters will decide if you have what they want.

Fast typing - give an average Words Per Minute rate. If you touch type, include that detail. If you do not - get on a course and learn, you will thank yourself in the future.
Creative - again, show this in your CV.

Work Experience
Within a given industry, recruiters tend to understand what a job entails. You were a waiter, fine. But don't insult your potential employer by explaining to them the job role of a waiter. After all, in your case, the potential employer is likely to employ plenty waiters. What a recruiter wants to see is what you achieved, not what you did. You learnt new skills, so briefly explain how these improved your ability to work at that establishment and how it will benefit your next employer. Link the skills and achievements to the employer that you are sending the CV to. Use bullet points rather than a paragraph. As "WhatsThePoint" stated, your CV absolutely must be tailored to each individual recipient. If you can photocopy your CV and send it to two different employers, it is a bad CV.

In your hobbies and interests, you state that you have learnt life skills with "Young Enterprise", but you fail to mention what this specific skills are. A potential employer does not want to see a generic "I have skills in business and advertising", they want to see specific skills that are applicable to their needs.

Your potential employer may be interested in your desire to obtain a driving license. However, they do not want to hear your life story. There is no interest whatsoever in why you became a cyclist, only what you use it for and what benefit it will be. You cycle for enjoyment, fitness, and as a responsible mode of transport. Now consider what benefit this is to your next employer. Do you cycle in the local area whilst working at a hotel retreat? Could this enable you to offer sound advice on beautiful, yet generally unknown cycle trails or footpaths that guests would like to visit. Things that they are not going to see in the tourist guides?

The next one needs to be taken in the manner in which I mean it. I have the utmost respect for the fact that an injury has prevented you from seeking a career as a professional footballer, so please understand that what I say now should not be taken as a slight against the situation that arose and how it affected you.

You have stated that an injury took the prospect of a career in football out of your hands. This presents a defeatist attitude. It is not that a recruiter will look at that and think that you should have carried on with an injury. It is that you have taken the negative aspect (an injury has ruined your opportunity to seek a career as a professional footballer), and settled for it. You will have developed a knowledge of the sport that can still be put to great use. It may be clichéd, but you could take that experience and put it into practical use as a coach of a local youth team. A recruiter wants to see that when the cards are down, and you realise you have nothing left in your hands - you can still pick yourself up, and use what you have learned.

Bobbajob mentioned that your "Hobbies and Interests" section looked rushed. And this is absolutely correct. Hobbies and interests are supposed to be things that you are passionate about. Show that passion within what you write. If you can not show effort in things that you do for no other reason than the fact you enjoy them, a recruiter will doubt your ability to show even a passing interest in what they need you to do within your job role.

Don't bother with the Referees section. Do not even bother putting "References available on request". That is a given, you are just wasting space on your CV putting them there. An employer will not be interested in contacting your references unless they are preparing to give you a job, certainly it will never be before at least one interview. So keep your references printed on a separate document which you can give to the potential employer on demand (which means have them with you at an interview, but don't offer them - wait for them to be requested).

And finally. Your name, address, e-mail, and telephone number should be in the footer of every additional page after the first one. This way, if for any reason the pages become separated, you can still be contacted.

Best of luck with the job search, and best of luck with composing your CV.


Some really good information. Thank you.
#23
A final tip, get a decent gauge paper, not coloured, but not supermarket budget. Like in the glossy magazines, certain companies have their advert printed on thicker paper, it helps the magazine 'fall open' at this point. You want your CV to be noticeable for all the best reasons. You need to take note of the GSM value of the paper.

As a former professional in industry, who is now a teacher, I think the lengthy advice from DLee was very, very useful. It was also accurate and free!

Best of luck with the job hunt...
#24
Unbelievable_Jeff
I am a professional recruiter and the advice by dlee above is golden, spot on and very kind of him to share it.

Henvig
As a former professional in industry, who is now a teacher, I think the lengthy advice from DLee was very, very useful. It was also accurate and free!

Just wanted to post a tip of the hat, and a thank you to you both for taking the time to make your kind comments.
#25
dlee1
From the point of view of an experienced manager responsible for recruitment (IT and Retail), here is what I can tell you.

The blunt but honest truth is that I wouldn't have got to the end of the CV. Your CV would have been filed in the bin before I got to the second page. Hopefully though, I can explain why and point you in the right direction for improving it.

Initially - I am going to pick up on the spelling and grammar issue, as has already been mentioned. This is a small issue on its own, but it is significantly amplified by your profile. You have written the following phrases in your profile:
keen eye for detail -- my diligence and enthusiasm

Neither of those show through in your CV. That isn't to say that you don't possess those attributes, but simply you don't show them within the document. There are three things that you generally get to show to a prospective employer. Your CV, the cover letter and the envelope it comes in. If your CV states you have a keen eye for detail, I want to see it within the presentation of your CV, cover letter and the envelope. Otherwise it will be counted against you. The same applies for enthusiasm. If I can't see your enthusiasm within your CV, it will count against you.

Therefore - by all means keep those phrases, but execute their meaning within the content of what you send to prospective employers.
1. Hand write the envelope in neat and clear hand writing. (Hand written envelopes are always opened before printed ones by the vast majority of mail receivers/assistants.)
2. Hand write the cover letter, unless your hand writing is really bad. (A typed and printed cover letter may look more official, but a hand written one shows that you have spent time and effort writing to that individual company.)
3. Go through your documents with a fine tooth comb. Give it to someone else to go through with a fine tooth comb. Do it again yourself. Rinse, and repeat.
4. None of us mere mortals have perfect grammar (within my own response, I have already seen plenty of mistakes on a re-read) - so cheat! Use a service with British grammar to check your documents. Take out a free trial with Grammarly and put your documents through it. Correct the problems.

Presentation
You have stated that you are looking for work within the hospitality industry. A key area of hospitality is presentation, and potential employers are going to want to see that within the documents that you send them. Given that your CV is a .doc file, I have to allow for the possibility that certain layout errors may be because of the conversion to open it in LibreOffice. However, the overall design of the CV is quite stale and tiresome.

The HR team/recruitment manager is going to see plenty of requests for work. There are two things that they want more than anything. Something that looks interesting, and something that is easy to read.

You have indented progressively (a waste of space, and quite difficult to read), but also inconsistently. Everything must maintain a consistent approach through your documentation. Do not be afraid to use lines to define areas rather than spaces. Don't (whatever else you do) use a template. The layout and style needs to come from you, not the same person that has been responsible for hundreds of thousands of CVs over the years.

You have stated that you have experience in illustration and the use of Powerpoint, so show it. That doesn't mean you should turn your CV into a story board. However, Powerpoint is about presentation of information in an easy to convey manner. Bring your document to life with some subtle style. Take pride in what you are presenting, this is not a simple list of what you have done. It is the dining hall, the reception lobby, and the honeymoon suite all rolled into one. You would not present those in a drab and dull manner, would you?

You offer a brief explanation of your computer literacy. The ability to 'use' Word, Excel, Powerpoint and Access is ten a penny. What you need to do is give a reason for those skills to be there. Are you experienced in using Access, or are you experienced in creating and maintaining relational databases? (Top tip - do yourself a favour and practice using VBA. Virtually everyone can open a spreadsheet or database and input data. Being able to create an active spreadsheet or database that has back end scripting can be a huge selling point to an employer).

You state your competence in illustration, programming, and web design. (Point of interest - learn about and use the "Oxford Comma"). Stipulate the language(s) that you can program in, and the web technologies that you are competent in. Don't bluff these, but realise the person doing the recruiting is unlikely to have much insight into these, so make use of relevant keywords. All the buzz at the moment surrounds HTML5 & CSS3. If you can work with those, don't just put HTML and CSS. Use the descriptions that are becoming buzz words in the media, because that is how many recruiters will decide if you have what they want.

Fast typing - give an average Words Per Minute rate. If you touch type, include that detail. If you do not - get on a course and learn, you will thank yourself in the future.
Creative - again, show this in your CV.

Work Experience
Within a given industry, recruiters tend to understand what a job entails. You were a waiter, fine. But don't insult your potential employer by explaining to them the job role of a waiter. After all, in your case, the potential employer is likely to employ plenty waiters. What a recruiter wants to see is what you achieved, not what you did. You learnt new skills, so briefly explain how these improved your ability to work at that establishment and how it will benefit your next employer. Link the skills and achievements to the employer that you are sending the CV to. Use bullet points rather than a paragraph. As "WhatsThePoint" stated, your CV absolutely must be tailored to each individual recipient. If you can photocopy your CV and send it to two different employers, it is a bad CV.

In your hobbies and interests, you state that you have learnt life skills with "Young Enterprise", but you fail to mention what this specific skills are. A potential employer does not want to see a generic "I have skills in business and advertising", they want to see specific skills that are applicable to their needs.

Your potential employer may be interested in your desire to obtain a driving license. However, they do not want to hear your life story. There is no interest whatsoever in why you became a cyclist, only what you use it for and what benefit it will be. You cycle for enjoyment, fitness, and as a responsible mode of transport. Now consider what benefit this is to your next employer. Do you cycle in the local area whilst working at a hotel retreat? Could this enable you to offer sound advice on beautiful, yet generally unknown cycle trails or footpaths that guests would like to visit. Things that they are not going to see in the tourist guides?

The next one needs to be taken in the manner in which I mean it. I have the utmost respect for the fact that an injury has prevented you from seeking a career as a professional footballer, so please understand that what I say now should not be taken as a slight against the situation that arose and how it affected you.

You have stated that an injury took the prospect of a career in football out of your hands. This presents a defeatist attitude. It is not that a recruiter will look at that and think that you should have carried on with an injury. It is that you have taken the negative aspect (an injury has ruined your opportunity to seek a career as a professional footballer), and settled for it. You will have developed a knowledge of the sport that can still be put to great use. It may be clichéd, but you could take that experience and put it into practical use as a coach of a local youth team. A recruiter wants to see that when the cards are down, and you realise you have nothing left in your hands - you can still pick yourself up, and use what you have learned.

Bobbajob mentioned that your "Hobbies and Interests" section looked rushed. And this is absolutely correct. Hobbies and interests are supposed to be things that you are passionate about. Show that passion within what you write. If you can not show effort in things that you do for no other reason than the fact you enjoy them, a recruiter will doubt your ability to show even a passing interest in what they need you to do within your job role.

Don't bother with the Referees section. Do not even bother putting "References available on request". That is a given, you are just wasting space on your CV putting them there. An employer will not be interested in contacting your references unless they are preparing to give you a job, certainly it will never be before at least one interview. So keep your references printed on a separate document which you can give to the potential employer on demand (which means have them with you at an interview, but don't offer them - wait for them to be requested).

And finally. Your name, address, e-mail, and telephone number should be in the footer of every additional page after the first one. This way, if for any reason the pages become separated, you can still be contacted.

Best of luck with the job search, and best of luck with composing your CV.


Thanks I will use these tips and have a read tommorow to improve my CV, Thanks again for the post it will help others as well.<3
#26
dlee1
Unbelievable_Jeff
I am a professional recruiter and the advice by dlee above is golden, spot on and very kind of him to share it.

Henvig
As a former professional in industry, who is now a teacher, I think the lengthy advice from DLee was very, very useful. It was also accurate and free!

Just wanted to post a tip of the hat, and a thank you to you both for taking the time to make your kind comments.

You are most welcome. I plan on keeping your feedback for my students. They think I'm being a pain suggesting hand written covering letters. Your advice was top notch!
#27
Henvig
You are most welcome. I plan on keeping your feedback for my students. They think I'm being a pain suggesting hand written covering letters. Your advice was top notch!

People look at me as though I have just walked out of a cave when I tell them to use a pen. There is no substitute for a carefully written letter when it comes to really showing that you are not just looking for the next job, but that you are interested in working with the company, and people, you are prospecting.

I have never excluded someone solely because their cover letter was typed. But I have perhaps put some people through initial picks, that would not have made it through, had that same cover letter turned up printed rather than written. You can get more of a feel for a person's personality through their written words, than through the harsh and soulless form of a printed letter.
#28
whelan189
I feel really greatful for all the help from some of the members, I feel some people get a kick putting my down because my english is not the best, but neither is most kids my age, so back off.. most of you slating me are mid 30s, what do you expect?

thanks dlee1 and other that have helped I am going to set aside time to read through it bit by bit and change my cv:)

Also, when im on forums and online i do not care about my spelling as i prefer to do it quickly and get on with life


Yet you expect others to give up their time to give you help.

To be honest, my 11 year old neighbour has better English skills than you, so your comments are both unfair and untrue.
#29
dlee1
From the point of view of an experienced manager responsible for recruitment (IT and Retail), here is what I can tell you.

The blunt but honest truth is that I wouldn't have got to the end of the CV. Your CV would have been filed in the bin before I got to the second page. Hopefully though, I can explain why and point you in the right direction for improving it.

Initially - I am going to pick up on the spelling and grammar issue, as has already been mentioned. This is a small issue on its own, but it is significantly amplified by your profile. You have written the following phrases in your profile:
keen eye for detail -- my diligence and enthusiasm

Neither of those show through in your CV. That isn't to say that you don't possess those attributes, but simply you don't show them within the document. There are three things that you generally get to show to a prospective employer. Your CV, the cover letter and the envelope it comes in. If your CV states you have a keen eye for detail, I want to see it within the presentation of your CV, cover letter and the envelope. Otherwise it will be counted against you. The same applies for enthusiasm. If I can't see your enthusiasm within your CV, it will count against you.

Therefore - by all means keep those phrases, but execute their meaning within the content of what you send to prospective employers.
1. Hand write the envelope in neat and clear hand writing. (Hand written envelopes are always opened before printed ones by the vast majority of mail receivers/assistants.)
2. Hand write the cover letter, unless your hand writing is really bad. (A typed and printed cover letter may look more official, but a hand written one shows that you have spent time and effort writing to that individual company.)
3. Go through your documents with a fine tooth comb. Give it to someone else to go through with a fine tooth comb. Do it again yourself. Rinse, and repeat.
4. None of us mere mortals have perfect grammar (within my own response, I have already seen plenty of mistakes on a re-read) - so cheat! Use a service with British grammar to check your documents. Take out a free trial with Grammarly and put your documents through it. Correct the problems.

Presentation
You have stated that you are looking for work within the hospitality industry. A key area of hospitality is presentation, and potential employers are going to want to see that within the documents that you send them. Given that your CV is a .doc file, I have to allow for the possibility that certain layout errors may be because of the conversion to open it in LibreOffice. However, the overall design of the CV is quite stale and tiresome.

The HR team/recruitment manager is going to see plenty of requests for work. There are two things that they want more than anything. Something that looks interesting, and something that is easy to read.

You have indented progressively (a waste of space, and quite difficult to read), but also inconsistently. Everything must maintain a consistent approach through your documentation. Do not be afraid to use lines to define areas rather than spaces. Don't (whatever else you do) use a template. The layout and style needs to come from you, not the same person that has been responsible for hundreds of thousands of CVs over the years.

You have stated that you have experience in illustration and the use of Powerpoint, so show it. That doesn't mean you should turn your CV into a story board. However, Powerpoint is about presentation of information in an easy to convey manner. Bring your document to life with some subtle style. Take pride in what you are presenting, this is not a simple list of what you have done. It is the dining hall, the reception lobby, and the honeymoon suite all rolled into one. You would not present those in a drab and dull manner, would you?

You offer a brief explanation of your computer literacy. The ability to 'use' Word, Excel, Powerpoint and Access is ten a penny. What you need to do is give a reason for those skills to be there. Are you experienced in using Access, or are you experienced in creating and maintaining relational databases? (Top tip - do yourself a favour and practice using VBA. Virtually everyone can open a spreadsheet or database and input data. Being able to create an active spreadsheet or database that has back end scripting can be a huge selling point to an employer).

You state your competence in illustration, programming, and web design. (Point of interest - learn about and use the "Oxford Comma"). Stipulate the language(s) that you can program in, and the web technologies that you are competent in. Don't bluff these, but realise the person doing the recruiting is unlikely to have much insight into these, so make use of relevant keywords. All the buzz at the moment surrounds HTML5 & CSS3. If you can work with those, don't just put HTML and CSS. Use the descriptions that are becoming buzz words in the media, because that is how many recruiters will decide if you have what they want.

Fast typing - give an average Words Per Minute rate. If you touch type, include that detail. If you do not - get on a course and learn, you will thank yourself in the future.
Creative - again, show this in your CV.

Work Experience
Within a given industry, recruiters tend to understand what a job entails. You were a waiter, fine. But don't insult your potential employer by explaining to them the job role of a waiter. After all, in your case, the potential employer is likely to employ plenty waiters. What a recruiter wants to see is what you achieved, not what you did. You learnt new skills, so briefly explain how these improved your ability to work at that establishment and how it will benefit your next employer. Link the skills and achievements to the employer that you are sending the CV to. Use bullet points rather than a paragraph. As "WhatsThePoint" stated, your CV absolutely must be tailored to each individual recipient. If you can photocopy your CV and send it to two different employers, it is a bad CV.

In your hobbies and interests, you state that you have learnt life skills with "Young Enterprise", but you fail to mention what this specific skills are. A potential employer does not want to see a generic "I have skills in business and advertising", they want to see specific skills that are applicable to their needs.

Your potential employer may be interested in your desire to obtain a driving license. However, they do not want to hear your life story. There is no interest whatsoever in why you became a cyclist, only what you use it for and what benefit it will be. You cycle for enjoyment, fitness, and as a responsible mode of transport. Now consider what benefit this is to your next employer. Do you cycle in the local area whilst working at a hotel retreat? Could this enable you to offer sound advice on beautiful, yet generally unknown cycle trails or footpaths that guests would like to visit. Things that they are not going to see in the tourist guides?

The next one needs to be taken in the manner in which I mean it. I have the utmost respect for the fact that an injury has prevented you from seeking a career as a professional footballer, so please understand that what I say now should not be taken as a slight against the situation that arose and how it affected you.

You have stated that an injury took the prospect of a career in football out of your hands. This presents a defeatist attitude. It is not that a recruiter will look at that and think that you should have carried on with an injury. It is that you have taken the negative aspect (an injury has ruined your opportunity to seek a career as a professional footballer), and settled for it. You will have developed a knowledge of the sport that can still be put to great use. It may be clichéd, but you could take that experience and put it into practical use as a coach of a local youth team. A recruiter wants to see that when the cards are down, and you realise you have nothing left in your hands - you can still pick yourself up, and use what you have learned.

Bobbajob mentioned that your "Hobbies and Interests" section looked rushed. And this is absolutely correct. Hobbies and interests are supposed to be things that you are passionate about. Show that passion within what you write. If you can not show effort in things that you do for no other reason than the fact you enjoy them, a recruiter will doubt your ability to show even a passing interest in what they need you to do within your job role.

Don't bother with the Referees section. Do not even bother putting "References available on request". That is a given, you are just wasting space on your CV putting them there. An employer will not be interested in contacting your references unless they are preparing to give you a job, certainly it will never be before at least one interview. So keep your references printed on a separate document which you can give to the potential employer on demand (which means have them with you at an interview, but don't offer them - wait for them to be requested).

And finally. Your name, address, e-mail, and telephone number should be in the footer of every additional page after the first one. This way, if for any reason the pages become separated, you can still be contacted.

Best of luck with the job search, and best of luck with composing your CV.


could you help me please. I'm sure my application must be going wrong some where or another.
I can't get a job.
#30
In
dlee1
From the point of view of an experienced manager responsible for recruitment (IT and Retail), here is what I can tell you.

The blunt but honest truth is that I wouldn't have got to the end of the CV. Your CV would have been filed in the bin before I got to the second page. Hopefully though, I can explain why and point you in the right direction for improving it.

Initially - I am going to pick up on the spelling and grammar issue, as has already been mentioned. This is a small issue on its own, but it is significantly amplified by your profile. You have written the following phrases in your profile:
keen eye for detail -- my diligence and enthusiasm

Neither of those show through in your CV. That isn't to say that you don't possess those attributes, but simply you don't show them within the document. There are three things that you generally get to show to a prospective employer. Your CV, the cover letter and the envelope it comes in. If your CV states you have a keen eye for detail, I want to see it within the presentation of your CV, cover letter and the envelope. Otherwise it will be counted against you. The same applies for enthusiasm. If I can't see your enthusiasm within your CV, it will count against you.

Therefore - by all means keep those phrases, but execute their meaning within the content of what you send to prospective employers.
1. Hand write the envelope in neat and clear hand writing. (Hand written envelopes are always opened before printed ones by the vast majority of mail receivers/assistants.)
2. Hand write the cover letter, unless your hand writing is really bad. (A typed and printed cover letter may look more official, but a hand written one shows that you have spent time and effort writing to that individual company.)
3. Go through your documents with a fine tooth comb. Give it to someone else to go through with a fine tooth comb. Do it again yourself. Rinse, and repeat.
4. None of us mere mortals have perfect grammar (within my own response, I have already seen plenty of mistakes on a re-read) - so cheat! Use a service with British grammar to check your documents. Take out a free trial with Grammarly and put your documents through it. Correct the problems.

Presentation
You have stated that you are looking for work within the hospitality industry. A key area of hospitality is presentation, and potential employers are going to want to see that within the documents that you send them. Given that your CV is a .doc file, I have to allow for the possibility that certain layout errors may be because of the conversion to open it in LibreOffice. However, the overall design of the CV is quite stale and tiresome.

The HR team/recruitment manager is going to see plenty of requests for work. There are two things that they want more than anything. Something that looks interesting, and something that is easy to read.

You have indented progressively (a waste of space, and quite difficult to read), but also inconsistently. Everything must maintain a consistent approach through your documentation. Do not be afraid to use lines to define areas rather than spaces. Don't (whatever else you do) use a template. The layout and style needs to come from you, not the same person that has been responsible for hundreds of thousands of CVs over the years.

You have stated that you have experience in illustration and the use of Powerpoint, so show it. That doesn't mean you should turn your CV into a story board. However, Powerpoint is about presentation of information in an easy to convey manner. Bring your document to life with some subtle style. Take pride in what you are presenting, this is not a simple list of what you have done. It is the dining hall, the reception lobby, and the honeymoon suite all rolled into one. You would not present those in a drab and dull manner, would you?

You offer a brief explanation of your computer literacy. The ability to 'use' Word, Excel, Powerpoint and Access is ten a penny. What you need to do is give a reason for those skills to be there. Are you experienced in using Access, or are you experienced in creating and maintaining relational databases? (Top tip - do yourself a favour and practice using VBA. Virtually everyone can open a spreadsheet or database and input data. Being able to create an active spreadsheet or database that has back end scripting can be a huge selling point to an employer).

You state your competence in illustration, programming, and web design. (Point of interest - learn about and use the "Oxford Comma"). Stipulate the language(s) that you can program in, and the web technologies that you are competent in. Don't bluff these, but realise the person doing the recruiting is unlikely to have much insight into these, so make use of relevant keywords. All the buzz at the moment surrounds HTML5 & CSS3. If you can work with those, don't just put HTML and CSS. Use the descriptions that are becoming buzz words in the media, because that is how many recruiters will decide if you have what they want.

Fast typing - give an average Words Per Minute rate. If you touch type, include that detail. If you do not - get on a course and learn, you will thank yourself in the future.
Creative - again, show this in your CV.

Work Experience
Within a given industry, recruiters tend to understand what a job entails. You were a waiter, fine. But don't insult your potential employer by explaining to them the job role of a waiter. After all, in your case, the potential employer is likely to employ plenty waiters. What a recruiter wants to see is what you achieved, not what you did. You learnt new skills, so briefly explain how these improved your ability to work at that establishment and how it will benefit your next employer. Link the skills and achievements to the employer that you are sending the CV to. Use bullet points rather than a paragraph. As "WhatsThePoint" stated, your CV absolutely must be tailored to each individual recipient. If you can photocopy your CV and send it to two different employers, it is a bad CV.

In your hobbies and interests, you state that you have learnt life skills with "Young Enterprise", but you fail to mention what this specific skills are. A potential employer does not want to see a generic "I have skills in business and advertising", they want to see specific skills that are applicable to their needs.

Your potential employer may be interested in your desire to obtain a driving license. However, they do not want to hear your life story. There is no interest whatsoever in why you became a cyclist, only what you use it for and what benefit it will be. You cycle for enjoyment, fitness, and as a responsible mode of transport. Now consider what benefit this is to your next employer. Do you cycle in the local area whilst working at a hotel retreat? Could this enable you to offer sound advice on beautiful, yet generally unknown cycle trails or footpaths that guests would like to visit. Things that they are not going to see in the tourist guides?

The next one needs to be taken in the manner in which I mean it. I have the utmost respect for the fact that an injury has prevented you from seeking a career as a professional footballer, so please understand that what I say now should not be taken as a slight against the situation that arose and how it affected you.

You have stated that an injury took the prospect of a career in football out of your hands. This presents a defeatist attitude. It is not that a recruiter will look at that and think that you should have carried on with an injury. It is that you have taken the negative aspect (an injury has ruined your opportunity to seek a career as a professional footballer), and settled for it. You will have developed a knowledge of the sport that can still be put to great use. It may be clichéd, but you could take that experience and put it into practical use as a coach of a local youth team. A recruiter wants to see that when the cards are down, and you realise you have nothing left in your hands - you can still pick yourself up, and use what you have learned.

Bobbajob mentioned that your "Hobbies and Interests" section looked rushed. And this is absolutely correct. Hobbies and interests are supposed to be things that you are passionate about. Show that passion within what you write. If you can not show effort in things that you do for no other reason than the fact you enjoy them, a recruiter will doubt your ability to show even a passing interest in what they need you to do within your job role.

Don't bother with the Referees section. Do not even bother putting "References available on request". That is a given, you are just wasting space on your CV putting them there. An employer will not be interested in contacting your references unless they are preparing to give you a job, certainly it will never be before at least one interview. So keep your references printed on a separate document which you can give to the potential employer on demand (which means have them with you at an interview, but don't offer them - wait for them to be requested).

And finally. Your name, address, e-mail, and telephone number should be in the footer of every additional page after the first one. This way, if for any reason the pages become separated, you can still be contacted.

Best of luck with the job search, and best of luck with composing your CV.

Is there anyway I can save or copy this reply from dlee1?
The advice and detail of the reply goes way above and beyond the usual responses either given or expected on here. My grandkids, currently searching for part time jobs, need to see that presentation is not just a grandma obsession.
Thanks for taking the time to post.
#31
Inactive
whelan189
I feel really greatful for all the help from some of the members, I feel some people get a kick putting my down because my english is not the best, but neither is most kids my age, so back off.. most of you slating me are mid 30s, what do you expect?

thanks dlee1 and other that have helped I am going to set aside time to read through it bit by bit and change my cv:)

Also, when im on forums and online i do not care about my spelling as i prefer to do it quickly and get on with life

Yet you expect others to give up their time to give you help.

To be honest, my 11 year old neighbour has better English skills than you, so your comments are both unfair and untrue.

no but I don't expect grown men, commenting abuse because im not in my mid 30s and got an A*, im sure there are things in your life your bad at, and im better then, my focus in life is not english, but I still passed 1st time
#32
booky

Is there anyway I can save or copy this reply from dlee1?
The advice and detail of the reply goes way above and beyond the usual responses either given or expected on here. My grandkids, currently searching for part time jobs, need to see that presentation is not just a grandma obsession.
Thanks for taking the time to post.

Hello, a little later on today I will pop the information, rewritten to be somewhat more universal, into a PDF file and post a link here so that you can download and/or print it. Will be late afternoon, I have the dreaded car MOT to deal with this morning ;)
#33
sofiasar

could you help me please. I'm sure my application must be going wrong some where or another.
I can't get a job.

I don't know as I can help you get a job, but I would be happy to look over your CV and offer advice. I won't be about until later this afternoon, but I will send you a PM shortly with my email address.
#34
dlee1
Henvig
You are most welcome. I plan on keeping your feedback for my students. They think I'm being a pain suggesting hand written covering letters. Your advice was top notch!

People look at me as though I have just walked out of a cave when I tell them to use a pen. There is no substitute for a carefully written letter when it comes to really showing that you are not just looking for the next job, but that you are interested in working with the company, and people, you are prospecting.

I have never excluded someone solely because their cover letter was typed. But I have perhaps put some people through initial picks, that would not have made it through, had that same cover letter turned up printed rather than written. You can get more of a feel for a person's personality through their written words, than through the harsh and soulless form of a printed letter.

not sure about writing cover letters, I can write really neat however that will take 30 minutes each one, nowadays you have to apply for 100 jobs to even get an interview, maybe i'll do a few that i'm confident about.

I'm going to read through and keep adding to me CV, and definitely get some nice quality paper to print, also what sort of enevolope do you suggest? A4 size one so it doesn't bend?

thanks:) for help this is why hotukd is awsome.
#35
whelan189
dlee1
Henvig
You are most welcome. I plan on keeping your feedback for my students. They think I'm being a pain suggesting hand written covering letters. Your advice was top notch!

People look at me as though I have just walked out of a cave when I tell them to use a pen. There is no substitute for a carefully written letter when it comes to really showing that you are not just looking for the next job, but that you are interested in working with the company, and people, you are prospecting.

I have never excluded someone solely because their cover letter was typed. But I have perhaps put some people through initial picks, that would not have made it through, had that same cover letter turned up printed rather than written. You can get more of a feel for a person's personality through their written words, than through the harsh and soulless form of a printed letter.

not sure about writing cover letters, I can write really neat however that will take 30 minutes each one, nowadays you have to apply for 100 jobs to even get an interview, maybe i'll do a few that i'm confident about.

I'm going to read through and keep adding to me CV, and definitely get some nice quality paper to print, also what sort of enevolope do you suggest? A4 size one so it doesn't bend?

thanks:) for help this is why hotukd is awsome.

If you have to apply for anywhere near 100 jobs just to get an interview, it is because your application is a problem. If you are not getting an interview from every 5 - 10 applications, you are either applying for unsuitable jobs, or your CV/cover letter is very wrong.
#36
dlee1
whelan189
dlee1
Henvig
You are most welcome. I plan on keeping your feedback for my students. They think I'm being a pain suggesting hand written covering letters. Your advice was top notch!

People look at me as though I have just walked out of a cave when I tell them to use a pen. There is no substitute for a carefully written letter when it comes to really showing that you are not just looking for the next job, but that you are interested in working with the company, and people, you are prospecting.

I have never excluded someone solely because their cover letter was typed. But I have perhaps put some people through initial picks, that would not have made it through, had that same cover letter turned up printed rather than written. You can get more of a feel for a person's personality through their written words, than through the harsh and soulless form of a printed letter.

not sure about writing cover letters, I can write really neat however that will take 30 minutes each one, nowadays you have to apply for 100 jobs to even get an interview, maybe i'll do a few that i'm confident about.

I'm going to read through and keep adding to me CV, and definitely get some nice quality paper to print, also what sort of enevolope do you suggest? A4 size one so it doesn't bend?

thanks:) for help this is why hotukd is awsome.

If you have to apply for anywhere near 100 jobs just to get an interview, it is because your application is a problem. If you are not getting an interview from every 5 - 10 applications, you are either applying for unsuitable jobs, or your CV/cover letter is very wrong.
hi dlee printed out your response and going through my cv at the moment, you say the layout is a bit bland, could you give me a suggestion on making it more intresting? thanks:)
#37
Personally, I don't think the general layout is too bad, although I find the use of colour in your initials very distracting.

"...if some can amend the section of experience cannot get it to line up correctly...". Yes - you can! Turn on the display of formatting symbols to see where you are using a succession of spaces instead of tabs. Use the format painter to ensure that your margins, indents, and tabs are consistent from one paragraph to the next.

Those are all the hints I'm going to give you, except to butcher the cycling and football sections down to the following:

Cycling and playing football.

If you get an interview, you can tell them the sad story of how injury kept you from the professional game. The CV is not the place.
#38
therealpmuk
Personally, I don't think the general layout is too bad, although I find the use of colour in your initials very distracting.

"...if some can amend the section of experience cannot get it to line up correctly...". Yes - you can! Turn on the display of formatting symbols to see where you are using a succession of spaces instead of tabs. Use the format painter to ensure that your margins, indents, and tabs are consistent from one paragraph to the next.

Those are all the hints I'm going to give you, except to butcher the cycling and football sections down to the following:

Cycling and playing football.

If you get an interview, you can tell them the sad story of how injury kept you from the professional game. The CV is not the place.

hi thanks, i have re-read it and take everyone thoughts it was bit stupid and have amended them parts:), put it through like 3 grammar checks and made it all aligned to the left

http://speedy.sh/yDkXZ/help.doc

for anyone to double check updated
#39
dlee1
From the point of view of an experienced manager responsible for recruitment (IT and Retail), here is what I can tell you.

The blunt but honest truth is that I wouldn't have got to the end of the CV. Your CV would have been filed in the bin before I got to the second page. Hopefully though, I can explain why and point you in the right direction for improving it.

Initially - I am going to pick up on the spelling and grammar issue, as has already been mentioned. This is a small issue on its own, but it is significantly amplified by your profile. You have written the following phrases in your profile:
keen eye for detail -- my diligence and enthusiasm

Neither of those show through in your CV. That isn't to say that you don't possess those attributes, but simply you don't show them within the document. There are three things that you generally get to show to a prospective employer. Your CV, the cover letter and the envelope it comes in. If your CV states you have a keen eye for detail, I want to see it within the presentation of your CV, cover letter and the envelope. Otherwise it will be counted against you. The same applies for enthusiasm. If I can't see your enthusiasm within your CV, it will count against you.

Therefore - by all means keep those phrases, but execute their meaning within the content of what you send to prospective employers.
1. Hand write the envelope in neat and clear hand writing. (Hand written envelopes are always opened before printed ones by the vast majority of mail receivers/assistants.)
2. Hand write the cover letter, unless your hand writing is really bad. (A typed and printed cover letter may look more official, but a hand written one shows that you have spent time and effort writing to that individual company.)
3. Go through your documents with a fine tooth comb. Give it to someone else to go through with a fine tooth comb. Do it again yourself. Rinse, and repeat.
4. None of us mere mortals have perfect grammar (within my own response, I have already seen plenty of mistakes on a re-read) - so cheat! Use a service with British grammar to check your documents. Take out a free trial with Grammarly and put your documents through it. Correct the problems.

Presentation
You have stated that you are looking for work within the hospitality industry. A key area of hospitality is presentation, and potential employers are going to want to see that within the documents that you send them. Given that your CV is a .doc file, I have to allow for the possibility that certain layout errors may be because of the conversion to open it in LibreOffice. However, the overall design of the CV is quite stale and tiresome.

The HR team/recruitment manager is going to see plenty of requests for work. There are two things that they want more than anything. Something that looks interesting, and something that is easy to read.

You have indented progressively (a waste of space, and quite difficult to read), but also inconsistently. Everything must maintain a consistent approach through your documentation. Do not be afraid to use lines to define areas rather than spaces. Don't (whatever else you do) use a template. The layout and style needs to come from you, not the same person that has been responsible for hundreds of thousands of CVs over the years.

You have stated that you have experience in illustration and the use of Powerpoint, so show it. That doesn't mean you should turn your CV into a story board. However, Powerpoint is about presentation of information in an easy to convey manner. Bring your document to life with some subtle style. Take pride in what you are presenting, this is not a simple list of what you have done. It is the dining hall, the reception lobby, and the honeymoon suite all rolled into one. You would not present those in a drab and dull manner, would you?

You offer a brief explanation of your computer literacy. The ability to 'use' Word, Excel, Powerpoint and Access is ten a penny. What you need to do is give a reason for those skills to be there. Are you experienced in using Access, or are you experienced in creating and maintaining relational databases? (Top tip - do yourself a favour and practice using VBA. Virtually everyone can open a spreadsheet or database and input data. Being able to create an active spreadsheet or database that has back end scripting can be a huge selling point to an employer).

You state your competence in illustration, programming, and web design. (Point of interest - learn about and use the "Oxford Comma"). Stipulate the language(s) that you can program in, and the web technologies that you are competent in. Don't bluff these, but realise the person doing the recruiting is unlikely to have much insight into these, so make use of relevant keywords. All the buzz at the moment surrounds HTML5 & CSS3. If you can work with those, don't just put HTML and CSS. Use the descriptions that are becoming buzz words in the media, because that is how many recruiters will decide if you have what they want.

Fast typing - give an average Words Per Minute rate. If you touch type, include that detail. If you do not - get on a course and learn, you will thank yourself in the future.
Creative - again, show this in your CV.

Work Experience
Within a given industry, recruiters tend to understand what a job entails. You were a waiter, fine. But don't insult your potential employer by explaining to them the job role of a waiter. After all, in your case, the potential employer is likely to employ plenty waiters. What a recruiter wants to see is what you achieved, not what you did. You learnt new skills, so briefly explain how these improved your ability to work at that establishment and how it will benefit your next employer. Link the skills and achievements to the employer that you are sending the CV to. Use bullet points rather than a paragraph. As "WhatsThePoint" stated, your CV absolutely must be tailored to each individual recipient. If you can photocopy your CV and send it to two different employers, it is a bad CV.

In your hobbies and interests, you state that you have learnt life skills with "Young Enterprise", but you fail to mention what this specific skills are. A potential employer does not want to see a generic "I have skills in business and advertising", they want to see specific skills that are applicable to their needs.

Your potential employer may be interested in your desire to obtain a driving license. However, they do not want to hear your life story. There is no interest whatsoever in why you became a cyclist, only what you use it for and what benefit it will be. You cycle for enjoyment, fitness, and as a responsible mode of transport. Now consider what benefit this is to your next employer. Do you cycle in the local area whilst working at a hotel retreat? Could this enable you to offer sound advice on beautiful, yet generally unknown cycle trails or footpaths that guests would like to visit. Things that they are not going to see in the tourist guides?

The next one needs to be taken in the manner in which I mean it. I have the utmost respect for the fact that an injury has prevented you from seeking a career as a professional footballer, so please understand that what I say now should not be taken as a slight against the situation that arose and how it affected you.

You have stated that an injury took the prospect of a career in football out of your hands. This presents a defeatist attitude. It is not that a recruiter will look at that and think that you should have carried on with an injury. It is that you have taken the negative aspect (an injury has ruined your opportunity to seek a career as a professional footballer), and settled for it. You will have developed a knowledge of the sport that can still be put to great use. It may be clichéd, but you could take that experience and put it into practical use as a coach of a local youth team. A recruiter wants to see that when the cards are down, and you realise you have nothing left in your hands - you can still pick yourself up, and use what you have learned.

Bobbajob mentioned that your "Hobbies and Interests" section looked rushed. And this is absolutely correct. Hobbies and interests are supposed to be things that you are passionate about. Show that passion within what you write. If you can not show effort in things that you do for no other reason than the fact you enjoy them, a recruiter will doubt your ability to show even a passing interest in what they need you to do within your job role.

Don't bother with the Referees section. Do not even bother putting "References available on request". That is a given, you are just wasting space on your CV putting them there. An employer will not be interested in contacting your references unless they are preparing to give you a job, certainly it will never be before at least one interview. So keep your references printed on a separate document which you can give to the potential employer on demand (which means have them with you at an interview, but don't offer them - wait for them to be requested).

And finally. Your name, address, e-mail, and telephone number should be in the footer of every additional page after the first one. This way, if for any reason the pages become separated, you can still be contacted.

Best of luck with the job search, and best of luck with composing your CV.

did some work to it

http://speedy.sh/yDkXZ/help.doc

will work on some other stuff you mentioned soon aswell:), feeling confident now

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