Cancer deaths 'to double in next 40 years' (obesity main cause) - HotUKDeals
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Cancer deaths 'to double in next 40 years' (obesity main cause)

Liddle ol' me Avatar
7y, 11m agoPosted 7 years, 11 months ago
Abridged from http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2009/feb/22/cancer-obesity-link

The growing obesity epidemic in industrialised countries is a leading cause of cancer according to a policy report led by Sir Michael Marmot, professor of epidemiology and public health at University College London.

About seven million people die from cancer worldwide each year, expected to rise to more than 10 million by 2020. The estimated number of new cases annually is set to increase from 10 million now to 16 million by 2020. Overall the toll is predicted to double in the next 40 years.

The new report, to be published on Thursday, will focus is on weight gain and obesity, which leads to around 13,000 cancer cases in the UK every year. The experts urge people to stay slim and abstain from too much fast food, red meat and preserved meat, such as ham and bacon, as well as alcohol.

The panel will call on individuals to take responsibility for themselves and their children, while stressing the need for action from governments, multinational corporations, civil society, industry, workplaces, schools, the media and health professionals.

A Department of Health spokesperson said: "Obesity is the biggest health challenge we face and many people simply don't know that being overweight can lead to major health problems, including cancer. The UK is leading the world when it comes to facing up to the problem and tackling obesity."
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Liddle ol' me Avatar
7y, 11m agoPosted 7 years, 11 months ago
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#1
you have to remember population is also going to increase as well, and in 40 years treament is going to get much better, as Is screening for certain types of cancer. Yes obesity is a major contributor to cancer, and cancer is going to increase because we are getting fatter, but I think these statements need a bit more justification.
#2
Sheep87
... I think these statements need a bit more justification


Yes, the full report is published on Thursday. :thumbsup:
#3
I'm not surprised by this. I have always believed that some cancers are connected to diet, and that junk food is one of the causes. If we are what we eat, then it makes some sense.
#4
Predikuesi
I'm not surprised by this. I have always believed that some cancers are connected to diet, and that junk food is one of the causes. If we are what we eat, then it makes some sense.


many cancers can be attributed to diet, especially such cancers as colon cancer. but on top of that, bad diet can lead to heart disease and stroke.
#5
Predikuesi
I'm not surprised by this. I have always believed that some cancers are connected to diet, and that junk food is one of the causes. If we are what we eat, then it makes some sense.


I've always thought that was a little pearl of wisdom worth preserving.
#6
Sheep87;4452968
many cancers can be attributed to diet, especially such cancers as colon cancer. but on top of that, bad diet can lead to heart disease and stroke.


I know. This happened to my brother-in-law in Ireland. He had Crone's disease, which is linked to diet. He had his colon removed. He is still overweight, so has not learned his lesson.
#7
I'd be interested to know the correlation between this and an ageing population. We know that the population is getting older so I would have been surprised if the level of cancer deaths didn't increase in direct proportion to this. As an overweight and healthy person I am fed up of the constant discussion where weight is given as the cause for many ills where, with a little more research or consideration of statistics, there is little direct relationship between the two. I do believe that junk food is bad for us and personally don't eat it.
"abstain from too much fast food, red meat and preserved meat, such as ham and bacon, as well as alcohol". - don't consume any of these!
#8
Predikuesi
I know. This happened to my brother-in-law in Ireland. He had Crone's disease, which is linked to diet. He had his colon removed. He is still overweight, so has not learned his lesson.

He may still be overweight but the link here is between his diet and the disease, not his weight and the disease.
#9
Susannah
He may still be overweight but the link here is between his diet and the disease, not his weight and the disease.


there is a link between weight and disease. Abdominal fat acts like a hormone secreting organ, and can greatly increase chances of type II diabetes, for example.
#10
Susannah
As an overweight and healthy person I am fed up of the constant discussion where weight is given as the cause for many ills where, with a little more research or consideration of statistics, there is little direct relationship between the two. I do believe that junk food is bad for us and personally don't eat it.
"abstain from too much fast food, red meat and preserved meat, such as ham and bacon, as well as alcohol". - don't consume any of these!


Yes of course there are lots of overweight people who don't suffer from serious illnesses, but there is much evidence to show a direct relationship between the two, sheep's example being just one. It's not even a matter of serious dispute in the medical community today, a topic of much hilarity and drunken discussion we had with my cousin a couple of years ago, a surgeon who has been seriously overweight since early childhood - and gets bigger every year!

His case is interesting because (a) he acknowledges the dangers of his weight for his health (and can explain them in great detail), (b) consumes food in vast amounts, (c) claims he could reduce his weight with relative ease if he changed those eating habits, but (d) says he has no desire to do so! :) He is the life and soul of social gatherings btw, and fiercely intelligent.

The anecdote shows I think that there is often no direct link between knowledge and action.
#11
I think this is a very sad subject.

When I was young there *were* no Mcdonalds in existence, that I knew of in this country anyway. And when I was a teenager and knew there were only because younger children wanted to go there, I still had no desire to eat there. We played out every day, we'd go out to play as soon as we were washed and dressed and came home only when we were hungry. We'd nip in, grab food and rush out to play again. I remember running out to play in the ice and snow with a hot mug of mushroom soup as I didn't have the patience to stay home and eat it. There were fewer cars on the roads, we could play in the roads for hours without seeing a car or needing to get out of the way. The main roads of course were far more busy than residential areas.

Obesity isn't just about what we eat these days. It is about the lifestyle changes and the cultural shift from one generation to the next.

My children don't seek the freedom and independence that I did as a child. They have computers, games machines, texting, all forms of communication and play that do not require leaving ones own home. They are more sluggish than we were. Wanna go swimming baby? "No" Wanna go trampolining? "no" They want to stay home, create websites, chat all day on the internet with "friends" whom they may never even meet in the real world.

It was half term this last week. My daughter was bored and I said to her, why not contact your friend see if she wants to play? Her reason? " I can't Mum, she never has any credit". The friend lives maybe 20 doors away. It never even *occurred* to her that she could open the door and step outside and walk round to her friends house. And they're lazy. "Can I go clothes shopping with my mates?" "Sure you can", " But we dont wanna catch the bus Mum, give us a lift?".

My age? 37.
Where did I grow up? Industrial Birmingham.
How much have times changed? Immensely.

Parents are scared to let their children out to play anymore because "care in the community" was another excuse for saving the government money and not helping people who were really suffering and needed help. Kids are more"stranger danger aware"now than they ever were before, they HAVE to be. Paedophiles and those who commit violent crimes against others don't serve long enough sentences. They are out of prison and on our streets.

Neither does the government provide enough sporting activities, free play areas for children. From youth clubs to toddler groups, there isn't enough money available for groups such as these.

My daughter ( 15) is doing homework at the moment. "Write a risk assessment of walking around our school". If we continue to live and bring up our children within this paranoid mindset of "Oh, if we move, something may happen to us!" ( But don't worry if it does, we can sue! ) Then we will never do anything and we can all just veg out on the sofa for another generation.

Obesity is more of a result of negative lifestyle choices thrust upon us by governmental decisions and legislation than the free will of the people. Did anyone ASK to be fat? No, it wasn't their choice, it crept up on them. Suddenly they are marginalised by society, teased and bullied by peers, prejudiced against in the job market and the health services." So you want a baby? Lose weight." A thin person and a fat person both need a heart transplant, which one will get it?

There is this constant media bombardment of painfully thin women that adorn magazines, newspapers, tv shows. Our teenagers feel they can't rate against these impossible specimens of humanity, it makes them worried and depressed. Imagery such as this is damaging to a growing individuals self esteem just at a time when they need it most. How many gorgeous young girls are there who *think* they are ugly just because they don't look like the latest anorexic supermodel.

It is about time some common sense was brought to this subject and moderation in all its forms recognised and respected.
#12
Clarityofmind has my complete agreement. It's exactly what I think is going wrong with society in this country nowadays. I used to love playing outside ALL day long with my mates, scoffing food 'cos I was starving from lots of fresh air and exercise, not mindlessly picking whilst on the Playstation. I lived in central London. I try to encourage my kids to do the same but have to admit sometimes giving up 'cos it's just too much hard work. But I will keep on battling because it's worth it. By the way they are all normal weights. The two boys luckily are well into sport so they do get some exercise, but they don't kick about in the parks like we did. Also, when we do drag the all kids kicking and screaming (joke!) to the park or seaside, they have such a great time we can't drag them home again! PS Where is the family unit nowadays? - That surely has some bearing on this too.
#13
Sheep87
there is a link between weight and disease. Abdominal fat acts like a hormone secreting organ, and can greatly increase chances of type II diabetes, for example.

I referred to the specific example of Crohn's disease not to a link between weight and disease in general. I did believe, however, that Crohn's disease is autoimmune and has a large genetic component.
#14
Just to finish on my mini-tirade! There have always been thin people, fat people and all sizes in-between. Fat is not recent it has just become more newsworthy than in the past. My mother (aged 80 and still healthy has always been fat, as was my grandmother who died aged 87). I have been fat almost all of my life, I do not eat junk or drink alcohol , eat lots of fruit and veg, am veggie and can walk for miles (up and down hill!). I am 52. I have three children - all grew up overweight despite the complete lack of junk, sweets, crisps, biscuits, puddings etc, in their lives. They all played outside come rain or shine and are now fit and healthy adults (though still large). I have been thin and had to be ill to do it. My daughter starved and exercised at the gym for 3 hours a day to keep within what is considered to be a 'normal' weight. For us, being thin just isn't worth the cost. Recent scientific evidence has suggested that the link between food consumption and size is not as straightforward as we all believe. My husband (rail thin and with the appetite of a large horse) agrees with all of this (and he is definitely opinionated enough to disagree with me if he wanted to!)

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